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DREW 



UNtVe«SlTV L««ABV 



Daily Report 

DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Vol. VII 



St. Louis, Missouri, Tuesday, April 26, 1988 



No. 1 



Some 2,600 Petitions Await Delegates Tomorrow 



First worship, then work is today's 
rder for General Conference members 
pening the quadrennial session. 
The first session for United 
Methodism's third century begins, as 
have previous assemblies, with the 
celebration of Holy Communion. 

Following the service, a bishop will call 
the roll and organize the conference. 

Delegates will adopt committee 
nominations and the plan of organiza- 
tion so that the 1988 General Conference 
can get under way. 



Agenda 

Tuesday, April 26 

1 p.m - Organ Prelude 

1:30 p.m. - Holy Communion 

2.45 p.m. - Organization of the 
Conference 
RoUCaU 

Report of the Commission on 
the General Conference 
Report of the Committee on 
Agenda 
Nominations 

Naming of Assistants to the 
Secretary 

Report of the Committee on 
Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order 

4:30 p.m. - Organization of the 
Legislative Committees 

6:15 p.m. Dinner and training 
meeting for offices of the 
Legislative Committees & 
Legislative Coordinators 

7:45 p.m. - Hymn Sing, Con- 
vention Center 

8:15 - Episcopal Address, Con- 
vention Center 

9:15 - Meeting of Legislative 
Committee Officers and 
Coordinators 



At 4:30 p.m., the 12 legislative commit- 
tees will meet to elect officers and or- 
ganize. Newly elected officers will 
gather for dinner and a briefing. 

Bishop Jack M. Tuell will deliver the 
Episcopal Address at 8:30 p.m. today. 
Preceding the address, sizing up "the 
state of the church," is a popular, old- 
fashioned United Methodist hymn sing. 

Some 2,661 petitions await delegates in 
their legislative sessions. Conference 
Secretaiy C. Faith Richardson reports 
that figure is down from 4, 185 requests 



Most of the first week will be spent in 
legislative sections. Exceptions are the 
Bishops' Hour at 8:30 each morning, 
beginning tomorrow, and the Laity Ad- 
dress at 9 a.m. tomorrow. 

After proposals are considered and per- 
fected in legislative sections, delegates 
will convene in plenaries for the second 
week. 

On Saturday delegates can enjoy a spe- 
cial celebration for Missouri Night 
which will be observed at 7:00 p.m. Sun- 
day. 



A 



The United Methodist Church 




you to the city 
) make your stay 



Some of the most diversified branches of United Methodism have 
roots in Missouri. At one time there were three Episcopal Area 
Headquarters of our predecessor denominations located in the state. 
There were several ethnic Conferences in Missouri. Sometime ago there 
were significant groups of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the 
Methodist Episcopal Church South, the Evangelical Unit 
Church and the Methodist Protestant Church, all located in Misso 
Now we are one people and are united in seeking to make your stay ■ 
us to be that which will be long remembered and which will ma> 
positive spiritual and social impact upon the church for many year 



experience. Because his heart was "strangely warmed" 
founded has brought spiritual growth to nillions. It 
hope that during your deliberations, decisions will be 
enhance the spiritual growth of United Methodists for y 



St. 



the Gateway Ci 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26,1988 



TRAINING SESSION 

Immediately following the election of 
legislative committee officers on Tues- 
day afternoon, April 26, there will be a 
two-hour training session to review their 
various responsibilities. Chairs, vice- 
chairs, secretaries, legislative committee 
coordinators and the assigned volunteer 
typists for the twelve legislative commit- 
tees will gather in Room 260 of the Cer- 
vantes Convention Center at 6:00 p.m. 
Box lunches will be served. 

Using a Training Handbook, prepared 
over a two-year period by the Committee 
on the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order and the Secretarial Support Staff, 
the group will divide into three working 
sections: 

1. "Presiding and Presenting Reports to 
General Conference" led by Frank H. 
Nestler, chair of the Committee on Plan 
of Organization and Rules of Order; and 
Jerry G. Bray, Jr., consultant 

2. "Sorting Petitions and Choosing 
Priorities" led by Frances M. Alguire, 
chair of the Commission on the General 
Conference; Paula Johnston, member of 
the Commission; and Bruce P. Blake, 
consultant 

3. "Making and Processing Reports" led 
by C. Faith Richardson, secretary of the 
General Conference, Merrill W. Dren- 
nan, coordinator of Calendar; D. Jean 
Hanson, office manager; and Theodore 
L. Agnew, consultant 

A brief closing combined session will 
give an opportunity for J. Richard Peck; 
editor of the Daily Christian Advocate; 
and Ronald P. Patterson, book editor for 
the Book of Discipline, to clarify their 
roles in the legislative process. 






^ t. 7 



John Ashcrof 



GREETINGS: 



Executive Office 

State of Missouri 
Jefferson City 

April 26. 1988 




Both personally and as Governor, it is my pleasure to extend a 
warm, Missouri welcome to the delegates of the General 
Conference of the United Methodist Church. 

I hope during your stay you will have time to explore and 
enjoy some of the many attractions offered by St. Louis. The 
Gateway Arch stands as a monument to the city's role as 
Gateway to the West during our nation's expansion and as 
Gateway to the Future as our state continues to thrive and 
grow. Whether you enjoy the thrill of professional sports, 
exploring historic sites, shopping or sampling international 
cuisine, St. Louis offers something to suit every taste, every 
mood. 

Throughout our nation's history, our churches have played a 
vital role in the building of this great nation. Our democracy 
is basically a moral concept, for without individual integrity 
we cannot work together for the common good. As Christians, 
we have a special role to play in helping to maintain the 
values upon which our nation was built. I wish you success as 
you consider the issues before you during your conference. 

My best wishes for a pleasant stay in our state. 



Sincerely, 



^. 



pC^ Cfi^Y-^^.szj^^^jfjf 



GOVERNOR 



v^"} ^% Daily Christian Advocate 




Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
Display in Civic Center Elxhibition Hall. 
Staff 



^^ LOVi\' 



Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference 
of the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 
published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist PubUshing 
House, P.O. Box 801, Nashville, TN 
37202. 



J. Kichard Peck Editor 

Bett£ Prestwood Associate Editor 

Sheila W. McGee Managing Editor 

AndrewMiller Business Manager 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Meredith Danaher .... Calendar & Proceedings Editor 

Kichard street Composition Manager 

News & Features 

Mike CunniDgham Composition Manager 

Calendar & Proceedings 

Barbara J. Wynn Assistant Composition Manager 

James Steele News/Roundup Manager 

Kathy Kruger Assistant News Editor 

Crys Zinkiewicz Chief Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg Assistant Copy Editor 

Cindy Solomon Assistant Copy Editor 

Louise McEowen Assistant Copy Editor 

Jane M. Schwarz Assistant Copy Editor 

Vivian Mitchell Secretarial Pool Manager 

Angela R. Butler Secretary 

Mochell Anderson Secretary 



Bradford L. MotU Feature Editor 

Glenn Hinton Index Editor 

John Goodwin Photographer 

Juanita Bellenfant Sales Manager 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Joyce Wolf Circulation Manager 

Robert K. Feaster Publisher 



Subscriptions: Daily Reports (binder included) 
$34.50 if picked up at the DCA booth (final issues 
mailed Ist class); $57.50 mailed daily from St. Louis 
by Ist class mail; $46.00 mailed after General Con- 
ference. Individual copies $3.00 each at DCA booth. 
Roundup Edition (one copy included in Daily 
Reports subscription), ten or more to one sddress, $1 
each; Single copies, $2 each. Sets mailed after Con- 
ference: Advance Editions Workbook, $ 17.50; Bound 
Volumes: Advance Editions Workbook and Daily 
Reports, $126 a set (mailed in Augustl. 



AprU 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Workbooks, DCA available 

Here's how to obtain copies of the Daily 
Christian Advocate and the Advanced 
Editions Workbook. These policies and 
prices have been established by the Com- 
mission on the General Conference. 

Delegates. Copies of the Advanced 
Edition Workbook were mailed without 
charge to delegates and first reserve 
delegates. Additional copies of the 
Workbook are available to delegates and 
first reserves for $17.50 each (including 
binder) at the DCA booth outside the 
publishing house resource display. The 
Daily Christian Advocate will be placed 
on the desks of delegates each morning. 
First reserves may receive their copies by 
presenting at the DCA booth the card 
found in their packets. 

Other Seated Reserves. Other re- 
serves who are seated in their delega- 
tions should secure Workbooks and back 
copies of the daily DCA from the delegate 
they are replacing. Otherwise, seated 
reserves may purchase the items at the 
DCA booth. 

Visitors, non-seated reserves. 

Copies of the Workbook with binder are 
available for $17.50 at the DCA booth. A 
DCA subscription is $30 when picked up 
daily at the booth and $40 when mailed 
to a church or home address. A binder 
is provided. Single copies of the DCA are 
$2. 



Develop your own General 
Conference report with custom 
audiotapes 

You can take home almost any portion 
of the 1988 General Conference on 
audiotape. One session or one speaker 
may hold major importance for you but 
would not necessarily be included in the 
audiotape resources being offered. For 
example, you might want a permanent 
recording of preaching services held in 
the convention hall. Making these ser- 
vices available on custom audiotapes also 
eliminates the cost of reprinting ser- 
mons in the Daily Christian Advocate. 

Unedited tapes of any portion of the 
General Conference, up to one hour in 
length, are being offered at $12 per hour. 
You may order your tapes at the General 
Church Periodicals display outside the 
United Methodist Publishing House ex- 
hibit. Tapes will be available on the day 
following the action recorded. This is 
only one of several audio-video resour- 




Gene McNary 

County Executive 



Office of the County Executive 

Saint Louis County 
Clayton, Missouri 63105 
January 27, 1988 



KJ 



TO GENERAL CONFERENCE DELEGATES AND VISITORS: 



The St. Louis Area is proud to host the General Conference of 
the United Methodist Church April 26 to May 6, 1988. As St. Louis 
County Executive, I extend a warm welcome to the delegates and 
visitors who will be with us during the event. 

I realize your time will be greatly consumed by the affairs 
and concerns of your church body but I hope that each of you will 
also have time to visit many of our outstanding attractions. 

The St. Louis Area is proud of what it offers, both to its 
citizens and visitors. Many of the attractions, such as the 
Gateway Arch, the St. Louis Zoo, Cardinal baseball, St. Louis 
Symphony, and Six Flags, are widely know, but there is much more. 
The diversity of our area and its rich heritage in nearly every 
field of endeavor virtually assures we have something of special 
interest to everyone. We have many fine religious and educational 
institutions of long standing; the Missouri Botanical Garden, 
National Museum of Transport, Laumeier Sculpture and Forest parks, 
among many others; the fine arts; notable architecture such as 
Eads Bridge and the Old Courthouse as well as the new shopping, 
dining, and entertainment centers throughout the area. 



We feel we are 
hope this will be 



friendly and helpful metropolitan area and I 
)nfirraed by you during your stay with us. 



May your Conference work be meaningful and fulfilling and 
your St. Louis experience be a pleasant one. My best wishes are 
with you. 

ly. 



^•-. 



Gene McNary 
County Execut 



Warning: DCA could be hazardous to your health 




DELEGATES 
BEWARE! In past 
years, several per- 
sons received nasty 
cuts while attempt- 
ing to insert the lat- 
est DCA issue into 
the binder (instruc- 
tions for assembling 
noted above). So, to 
hold down business 
at the first aid 
office, take care 
when using the 
metal fastener! 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



BADGES IDENTIFY GROUPS 

You can identify certain attendees of 
General Conference by the colors of 
their badges. 

The following combination of badge 
colors designate the following groups: 

White & Red: Delegates 

White & Light Blue: United Methodist 
Bishops 

White & Purple: Judicial Council 

White & Dark Blue: Commission on the 
General Conference 

White & Green: General Secretaries 

Blue & Blue: Conference Services 

Salmon & Dark Brown: Local Commit- 
tee 

Canary & Dark Orange: Marshals & 

Pages 

Green & Dark Green: Reserve Delegates 

BufT & Brown: General Council on 
Finance & Administration 

Cherry & Dark Blue: Board Staff 

Ivory & Brown: Ecumenical Representa- 
tives 

Ivory & Light Blue: Spouses of Bishops 

Ivory & Purple: Spouses of Judicial 
Council 

Ivory & Dark. Blue: Spouses of Commis- 
sion on the General Conference 

Pink & Brown: News Media 




CitvotSt.Loui 



:ix)Ciivn..ii 

Tucker*! M.ukolSlnvli 

SI Louii Mi»ourih3U)3 

(3141622-3201 



January 19, 1988 



Dear Friends, Delegates and Family Members: 

As Mayor of the City of Saint Louis, I would like to extend 
my warmest welcome to the delegates and visitors of the United 
Methodist Church, who will be holding their General Conference 
at the Cervantes Convention Center in St. Louis, Missouri from 
April 26 to May 6, 1988. 

While you are here, I hope you will enjoy the life and 
attractions of our region, including the interesting 
neighborhoods, entertainment and informative museums, sporting 
events, downtown and riverfront attractions and so much more we 
have to offer. We are a City of churches and their positive 
contributions to this Greater St. Louis area are so important 
and appreciated. 

Best wishes for a most successful event. Enjoy your visit 
to Saint Louis, we certainly enjoy having you. 



>inc«reiy , 



CONFERENCE TELEPHONE NUMBERS 

Business Manager/Director of Facilities 342-5358 

Commission on the General Conference 342-5358 

Daily Christian Advocate 342-5366 

First Aid 342-5056 

General Agencies 342-5376 

Information, Message Center, Lost & Found 342-5377 

Local Committee 342-5359 

News Desk 342-5353 

Photo Desk 342-5350 

Radio News 342-5355 

Secretary of General Conference 342-5363 

Secretarial Staff 342-5362 

Tour Desk 342-5378 

Treasurer's Office 342-5374 

TV News 342-5360 

Video Production 342-5369 



LOST & FOUND 

Lost and Found is located in the Information Booth in the lobby 
of the Convention Center 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Oral or projected announcements are restricted to the official 
operation of the General Conference and its legislative and ad- 
ministrative committees. Other announcements by groups (no 
individual messages) can be taken to the DCA office (Room 127) 
by 3 p.m. on the day prior to the publication date. 

PERSONS WITH HANDICAPPING CONDITIONS 

Sections of the hall have been set aside for persons with hand- 
icapping conditions. Marshals will be pleased to direct those re- 
quiring such seating to the appropriate sections. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Bishop Tuell to Deliver Episcopal Address 



TRAVEL-EXPENSE VOUCHERS 




A one-time attorney, five-time delegate 
to General Conference and a 16 year 
veteran in the Council of Bishops will 
deliver the address on behalf of the coim- 
cU. 

Dr. Jack M. Tuell, resident bishop of 
the Los Angeles Area will address the as- 
sembly this evening at 8:15 p.m. 

Bishop Tuell is a graduate of the 
University of Washington (B.S. in Law, 
1947), the Washington Law School 
(LLB, 1948), Boston University School 
of Theology (M.Div., 1955), and the 
University of Puget Sound (M.A., 1961). 
He has honorary doctorates from Pacific 
School of Religion and Alaska Pacific 
University. 

Bishop Tuell was ordained elder in 
1955 and served Lakewood Methodist 
Church in Tacoma, Washington, from 
1955-61. He was named superintendent 
of the Puget Sound District in 1961 and 
served on the cabinet until his appoint- 
ment as pastor of First United Methodist 
Church in Vancouver, Washington in 
1967. In 1972 he was elected bishop and 



MAIL TODAY 

Need to mail a letter or buy some 
stamps? 

For your convenience, a post of- 
fice will be located in the lobby of 
the Convention Center. It will be 
open Monday through Friday from 
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

MESSAGES 

There is a bulletin board located 
next to the Information Center in 
the lobby of the Convention 
Center. 



assigned to the Portland Area. He was 
assigned to the Los Angeles Area in 1980. 

At present, Bishop Tuell serves as 
president of the General Board of Pen- 
sions. He is also a trustee for the School 
of Theology at Claremont and Hawaii 
Loa College. Previously he chaired the 
General Commission on Christian Unity 
and Interreligious Concerns (1980-84), 
the Division of Ecumenical and Inter- 
religious Concerns (1976-80), and the 
National Division of the Board of Mis- 
sions (1972-76). He has also been a 
member of the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry (1980-84) and 
the Commission to Study Ministry. 

Practical experience in the parish, a 
full term as district superintendent, five 
terms as a delegate of General Con- 
ference, knowledgeable of mission work 
in the U.S. and ecumenical relations 
around the globe, administrative respon- 
sibility for higher education institutions 
and concerns, and some first-hand ex- 
perience as an attorney - all combine to 
give the Council of Bishops a first-rate 
representative for the episcopal address. 



How the Episcopal 
Address is Prepared 

The process for selecting the speaker 
and determining the content of the epis- 
copal address is a complex one. 

Approximately a year and one-half 
prior to General Conference, the Council 
of Bishops elects, by written ballot, one 
of its number to prepare and deliver the 
address. That bishop seeks as broad an 
input as possible, not only from other 
bishops, but from clergy and laity of the 
church as a whole. A first draft is 
brought to the council a year prior to 
General Conference for their considera- 
tion, criticism and suggestions. 

The bishop then brings a second draft 
at a council meeting some six months 
before (General Conference where once 
again the process of criticism and sugges- 
tion is carried through. Immediately 
prior to General Conference a third draft 
is brought to the council. At this time 
there may be further suggestions, al- 
though they are likely to be more 
editorial in nature. The council then 
votes to adopt the address as its own, and 
the officers of the council are authorized 
to sign the address on behalf of the entire 
body. 



The chair of each delegation has 
received an envelope containing travel- 
expense vouchers for each member of the 
delegation. 

Please read carefully the instructions 
related to allowable expenses as shown 
on the reverse side of the travel-expense 
voucher. Any questions should be 
directed to the Treasurer's Office, Room 
272. 

Complete these travel-expense 
vouchers promptly and return to the 
chair of the delegation for approval. The 
chairs will bring them to the Treasurer's 
Office, Room 272. The travel-expense 
checks, in accordance with approved 
travel -expense vouchers, will be delivered 
to the chairs later in the first week. 

Per diem expense vouchers will be dis- 
tributed to the chair May 2nd. Checks for 
per diem expense in accordance with ap- 
proved per diem expense vouchers will be 
delivered to the chairs before the close of 
the conference. 

All checks issued for travel expense or 
per diem expense will be written on the 
Mercantile Bank. Information concem- 



NEED TO CASH A CHECK? 

Checks issued for travel and per diem 
expenses of the delegates may be cashed 
with proper identification at the Mer- 
cantile Bank, three blocks south of the 
Alfonso J. Cervantes Convention and 
Exhibition Center on the comer of 8th 
and Locust. 

Personal checks must first be ap- 
proved in the Treasurer's Office (Room 
272) before they may be cashed at the 
Mercantile Bank. 

The bank lobby is open from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday, the 
closest MercantOe Bank branch open on 
Saturday is at Arsenal and Kings High- 
way in a Schnucks Grocery Store. The 
branch Saturday hours are 8:00 a.m. to 
9:00 p.m. Only these two locations of the 
Mercantile Bank may be used to cash 
checks. 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26. 1988 



Pennsylvania Engineer to Present Laity Address 



Joan G. Nagle, an engineer from Mur- 
rysville, Pennsylvania, will present the 
1988 Laity Address. She was named the 
winner of the contest on February 20, 
1988, during the annual meeting of the 
National Associaton of Annual Con- 
ference Lay Leaders in Nashville. 

Nagle is a senior engineer with the 
Power Systems Business unit of West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation in Pen- 
nsylvania. She serves as editor of Trans- 
action on Professional Communication, 
a publication of the Institute of Electri- 
cal and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), 
and as a member of the IEEE Profes- 
sional Communication Society. 

A member of First United Methodist 
Church in Murrysville, Pennsylvania, 
Nagle has served as a Sunday School 
teacher, choir member, family life coor- 
dinator, UMW president, pastor-parish 
relations chair, trustee, and lay leader. 
In fact, she was the first woman in her 
church to be elected to the positions of 
trustee and lay leader. She presently 
serves as director and first vice-president 
of the board of the Western Pennsyl- 
vania United Methodist Foundation and 
as co-chair of the conference endowment 
committee. 

Nagle and her husband, Elliott, are 
traveling enthusiasts and have toured 33 
foreign countries and 45 states. Both 
enjoy bicycling and camping. Mr. Nagle 
is a research chemist with Aristech 
Chemical Corporation. The couple have 
two daughters: Emily Katherine Nagle, a 
marketing director for a high-tech com- 
munications systems firm in Los An- 
geles; and Laura Nagle Baily, vice presi- 
dent of a bank in San Antonio. 

The search for the Laity Address was 
launched during the 1986 annual meet- 




ing of the National Association of An- 
nual Conference Lay Leaders 
(NAACLL). The group voted to launch a 
churchwide search. Hoping to involve a 
wider cross-section of United Methodist 
laity, the association departed from ear- 
lier approaches used for securing the 
Laity Address. Multiple authors and mul- 
tiple presenters had characterized the 
1980 and 1984 Laity Addresses. 

All lay members of The United 
Methodist Church were invited to submit 
manuscripts for the address, focusing on 
the theme "Ministry of the Laity: What It 
Means to Be Disciples Every Day." Con- 
testants were instructed to submit their 
manuscripts by June 30, 1987. Contes- 
tants were not to place their names else- 
where on the manuscript. 

As each manuscript was received, the 
cover sheet was removed; and the 
manuscript was coded and forwarded to 
a screening committee of ten United 
Methodist laypersons. 

According to Marcus Fang (Stevens 
Point, Wisconsin), chair of the Laity 



Search Committee, over 300 
manuscripts were submitted by the dead- 
line. Two came in from overseas: one 
from the Philippines; the other from 
Norway. The number of manuscripts 
submitted by women and men was even. 

In its first round of screening, the com- 
mittee sorted out the top 43 manuscripts. 
In a second round, the committee 
selected the four top finalists, all women: 
Mrs. Nagle; Gail S. Boyd of Fort Worth, 
Texas; June Parker Goldman of Spirit 
Lake, Iowa; and Kathy Trotter of 
Marion, Indiana. The finalists' names 
were announced last November. 

The last round of judging for the Laity 
Address Search took place on February 
20, during the NAACLL annual meeting 
in Nashville. A different panel of three 
judges and one alternate judge made the 
final decision. (All were United 
Methodist laypersons - nominated by the 
NAACLL and selected by its executive 
committee. Those serving as judges were 
Cecil D. Jones, Jr., head of the drama and 
speech department at Vanderbilt 
University, Nashville, Tennessee; Thel- 
ma Monbarren, public relations director 
at United Theological Seminary in 
Dayton, Ohio; Samuel Wong of 
Springfield, Virginia, a China expert 
with the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture; and alternate Carol Dinges, a 
speech and English teacher at Linn-Ben- 
ton College in Lebanon, Oregon. 

The lay leaders and judges heard the 
four finalists present their .speeches, and 
the winner was announced during a din- 
ner honoring all the finalists that eve- 
ning. 



"Cheryl A. Capshaw 



Temporary Seating of Reserves 



It is presumed that the elected 
delegates as printed in the Delegate 
Handbook will serve through the Con- 
ference. Where deaths or resignations 
have occurred since publication of the 
Handbook, the heads of each delegation 
have reported and monitored the re- 
placement by reserves in the order of 
election. Where a permanent change 
was made, the credential, the badge, and 
the DCA materials were properly shifted. 



The head of each delegation has the 
Temporary Seating Permit forms for 
speciilc sessions for the "in-conference" 
substitution of a reserve. Properly com- 
pleted it will admit the reserve for that 
specific session or day. At the close of 
that day or session, the permit should be 
turned into the delegation chairperson. 

Clergy must replace clergy, and lay 
reserves must replace lay delegates. 



Custom Tapes 

$12/hour. Order at 

Sales Booth 

Outside UM 

Publishing House 

Display 



AprU 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Worship Services 



Tuesday, April 26 

1:00 p.m. Concert: St. Mark's UMC 
Choir, New York City 
William Farley Smith, director 
1:30 p.m. Holy Communion 
Memorial Service 
Preacher: Earl G. Hunt Jr. 
Celebrant: Ernest Dixon 
Liturgists: College Presidents 

Wednesday, April 27 

8:20 a.m. Concert: Ministers 

Choir, West Ohio 

Carol Ann Bradley, director 

8:30 Morning Service 

Preacher: James M. Ault 

2:00 p.m. Choir Concert 

2:25 Organ prelude 

2:30 Afternoon service Preacher: 

Zan Holmes 

Liturgist: Lee Hamilton 

Thursday, April 28 



Jean Reynolds, director 
8:30 Morning Service 
Preacher: Woodie W. White 
2:00 p.m. Choir Concert 
2:25 Organ Prelude 
2:30 Afternoon Service 
Preacher: James I^ney 
Liturgist: Hope Kawashima 



Friday, April 29 

8:20 a.m. Concert: Albricias En- 
semble, Southern California 
Raquel Achon, director 
8:30 Morning Service 
Preacher: Paul A. Duffey 
2:00 p.m. Choir concert 
2:25 Organ prelude 
2:30 Afternoon Service Preacher: 
Thomas Roughface 
Liturgist: Elenor Richardson 



Saturday, April 30 

8:20 a.m. Concert: Clergywomen's 
Choir, Baltimore Conference 
Susan Beehler, director 
8:30 Morning Service 
Preacher: Fama Onema 
2:00 p.m. Choir concert 
2:25 Organ prelude 
2:30 Afternoon Service 
Preacher: Theodore W. Loder 
Liturgist: Carolyn Johnson 

Monday, May 2 

8:20 a.m. Concert: Brentwood UMC 

Youth Choir, Brentwood, Tenn. 

Mark Acker, director 

8:30 Morning Service 

Preacher: Judith Craig 

2:00 p.m. Choir concert 

2:25 Organ prelude 



2:30 Afternoon Service 
Preacher: Duane Zimmerman 
Liturgist: Rene Pino 

Tuesday, May 3 



8:20 a.m. Concert: Chancel Choir, 

First Korean UMC, Chicago Sung 

Soo Chung, director 

8:30 Morning Service (Ecumenical 

Service) 

2:00 p.m. Choir concert 

2:25 Organ prelude 

2:30 Afternoon Service Preacher: 

Hae Jong Kim 

Liturgist: Betty Trumble 

Wednesday, May 4 



8:20 a.m. Concert: Emerson UMC 
Choir, Indiahoma, Oklahoma 
Franklin Cable, director 
8:30 Morning Service 
Preacher: John Wesley Hardt 
2:00 p.m. Choir concert 
2:25 Organ prelude 
2:30 Afternoon Service 
Preacher: Charlene Kamerer 
Liturgist: Pedzisai Kangara 




Thursday, May 5 



8:20 a.m. Concert: Wesley Founda- 
tion Choir, Florida State Univer- 
sity, Tallahassee, Florida 
Robert Jackson, director 
8:30 Morning Service 
Preacher: Ray L Sano 
2:00 Choir Concert 
2:25 Organ prelude 
2:30 Afternoon Service Preacher: 
Leonard Sweet 
Liturgist: Jerry Richardson 



Friday, May ( 



8:20 a.m. Concert: Manchester 

UMC Chancel Choir, Manchester, 

Missouri 

Betty Gnaegy, director 

8:30 Morning Service 

Preacher: Calvin D. McConnell 




William Farley Smith 



The choir participating In todays 
worship is from the St. Marks 
United Methodist Church in New 
York City. Dr. William Farley 
Smith serves as the minister of 
music, and choral director. During 
its 1 17-year history, the choir has 
sung at the 1964 World's Fair, 
Radio City Music Hall, Carnegie 
Hall and several seminaries. 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



All About You 

A Report on Delegates to General Conference 



Frances Willard and four of her sisters, 
even though properly elected an even 
100 years ago, lost their bid to become 
the first women seated as delegates in a 
Methodist General Conference. 

However, today about one third (33.5%) 
of this 996-member assembly are 
women, or the first time in history, more 
than half the U.S. lay delegates will be 
women, as will 14 percent of clergy 
delegates. 

All but four of the 73 annual conference 
delegations in the United States and 
Puerto Rico will include laywomen, led 
by West Ohio with 12. Clergywomen 
delegates will represent 45 of the 73, 
paced by Wisconsin with three. 

By jurisdiction, the unofficial coimt is: 
North Central--76 women of 206 
delegates; Northwestern--70 of 182; 
South Central~45 of 174; Southeastern- 
-70 of 274; Western-28 of 68. 

At least 10 delegations will be headed by 
women. Several others elected women 
first on either the lay or clergy side of 
1987 annual conference voting, and 
three-Missouri East, Rocky Moimtain 
and Wyoming-named a woman first on 
both sides. 

In 1984 in Baltimore, 48 percent of the 
U. S. lay delegates were women, and 9 
percent of the clergy. As recently as 
1972, no clergywomen and only 123 
lajrwomen were among 912 General 
Conference delegates gathered in Atlan- 



Racial and Ethnic Backgrounds 

The percentage of ethnic minority 
delegates has increased from 11.2 per- 
cent in 1984 to 16.7 percent this session, 
according to a General Council on Mini- 
stries survey. The largest ethnic 
minority group is black, with 10.3 per- 
cent of the U.S. delegates, compared to 
8.2 percent in 1984. Several delegations 
will be headed by ehtnic minority per- 
sons. 



Age 

The ages of delegates range from 17 to 
84, with an average age of 53.9. Lay 
delegates average 55.6 years while clergy 
delegates average 52.3. 



Occupations 

The most common areas of employment 
for clergy are: pastors (73.8%) and super- 
intendents (19.8%). Last quadrennium, 
52. 1 percent were pastors and 30.4 per- 
cent were superintendents. 

Lay delegates represent 75 different oc- 
cupations. The largest percentage are in 
management and administration 
(17.8%) and homemaking (13.5%). Fif- 
teen percent are retired. These percent- 
ages are about the same as 1984. 

Past Experience 

One third (33.8%) of the delegates are 
attending their first General Con- 
ference, a decrease from 40.3 percent 
first-timers in 1984. 



This and That 

Of the total 996 delegates stipulated for 
the St. Louis General Conference, all but 
eight are United Methodists. These eight 
represent three other Methodist bodies 
with which the United Methodist 
Church has a concordat relationship 
calling for seating of voting delegates in 
each other's top legislative assemblies. 

Virginia and West Ohio have the largest 
delegations-32 each. Next in line are 
Florida and Western North Carolina 
with 28 each. 

Ten U. S. conferences are represented 
by the minimum of two delegates-one 
layperson, one clergyperson. Most con- 
ferences in Africa, Europe and the 
Philippines have sent two delegates 
each. 

For the first time, the North Pole will be 
represented. The Rev. Keith Wise was 
elected by the Alaska Missionary Con- 
ference. 

Richmond, Va., and Houston apparent- 
ly will have the largest number of 
delegates from any one city- 10 each. 
Atlanta can count nine, and Columbia, 
S. C, eight. 

Longevity Awards 

Leonard W. Slutz, a Cincinnati attorney, 
may claim the longevity prize. He was 
elected first in 1952 and has been in 
every General Conference since, either 
as a delegate or as a member of the Judi- 
cial Council. 



James Walker of Sequin, Texas, was 
elected for the first time in 1960; Jerry 
Bray of Chesapeake, Va., was elected in 
1964. 

On the clergy side, the Rev. Vernon 
Bigler of North Tonawanda, N.Y., first 
was a delegate in 1960 from what was 
then the Northwest Indiana Conference. 
The Rev. Charles A. Sayre of Haddon- 
field, N.J., dates his service from 1964. 

All longevity marks fade before that of 
Bishop Nolan B. Harmon, Atlanta, at 95 
the church's senior living bishop. 
Bishop Harmon attended the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South General Con- 
ference in 1930 as a delegate from Vir- 
ginia. 

All in the Family 

If some of the delegates think they are 
seeing double after 10 days of 18 hours, 
they will have a reason. The Revs. John 
Harnish of the Detroit Conference and 
James Harnish of Florida are identical 
twins. 

In Iowa, the Rev. Leroy Moore and 
Kathryn Moore, his wife, were the first 
elected on clergy and lay slates, respec- 
tively. Phil Carver, layman, is the son of 
the Rev. Donald Carver, a clergy 
delegate, and the son-in-law of Jo Anne 
Campney, lay delegate. 

Parsonage couples from other parts of 
the nation include: The Rev. Warren and 
Mary Ebinger, and the Rev. Walter and 
Nancy Zabel, Baltimore Conference; the 
Rev. Patricia and Robert Jelinek, North 
Central New York; and the Rev. Vernon 
and Patricia Bigler, Western New York. 

North Indiana lay delegates include hus- 
band and wife Kermit and Anita Bur- 
rous. The Revs. Charles R. Armstrong of 
South Indiana and Susan Keim Kester 
of Peninsula are cousins. 

The Revs. C. Garland Young and H. 
Claude Young, Jr. of the Western North 
Carolina delegation are brothers. 

In the Oklahoma delegation, the Rev. 
William Oden leads the clergy, and Tal 
Oden, his counsin, an attorney, heads 
the lay slate. The Rev. Mouzon Biggs, Jr. 
of Tulsa is a clergy delegate, and his 
father, Mouzon Biggs Sr., is on the Texas 
Conference lay slate. 

A television executive from North (Geor- 
gia, Tom Jackson, is a great-grandson of 
the late Bishop James Dickey. 

-Robert Lear 



AprU 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



What to do and see in St. Louis 

Recommendations from a Gateway City native with a bit of history thrown in. 



Diversity and expansion have been St. 
Louis hallmarks since it was founded by 
Pierre Laclede in 1764 as a French fur 
trading center. Since then, the city has 
grown to become the 14th largest 
metropolitan area in the U.S., the 
second largest inland port, the third 
largest rail center, the sixth busiest air 
center and one of the busiest hosts to 
conventions, conferences and business 
meetings (not to mention gatherings of 
major religious bodies). 

It's also a nice place to live. The recent 
second edition of Rand McNally's Places 
Rated Almanac, which ranked the 
country's nearly 300 metropolitan areas, 
placed St. Louis in seventh place. (And 
this is spite of the city's notoriously hot, 
muggy summers.) 

Located just south of the confluence of 
the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, St. 
Louis City and County encompass 567 
square miles with 2.4 million persons. 
Cost of living in St. Louis is lower than 
25 large metro areas. 
Completion of the magnificant Gateway 
Arch in the mid-1960s marked the 
beginning of a significant renaissance 
for the city's downtown area and 
beyond. 
The spirit has continued unabated. 
Since 1985, It has led the nation in 
redevelopment projects. This mxilti-mil- 
lion dollar revitalization already has 
brought about opening of four new 
luxury hotels, three large shopping malls 
and a nimiber of other new attractions, 
with more on the way. 

Attractions 

Designed in the mid- 1940s by the late 
architect Eero Saarinen the Gateway 
Arch rises some 630 feet above the banks 
of the Mississippi River and gently 
returns to earth. Technically known as 
the Jefferson National Expansion 
Memorial, it's one of the nation's top 10 
tourist attractions offering a breathtak- 
ing view of the city. Each leg of the arch 
has a passenger tram to cany visitors to 
an observation room at the top. Admis- 
sion: $2.50 for adults, 50 cents for 
children. (NOTE: Avoid the tram ride if 
you suffer from claustrophobia or 
agoraphobia.) 

Tickets for the tram may be purchased 
beneath the arch, in the Museum of 
Westward Expansion. Suggestion: Buy 
your tram tickets early, as the arch ob- 
servation area can only handle so many 



at a time. You'll be told at what time your 
ticket(s) will be called. Use the time 
then to visit the museum, go over to the 
Old Courthouse, or visit the Old 
Cathedral, both within a short walk. 

The Museum of Westward Expansion 
offers visitors an insight into the 
country's westward march, plus a look at 
St. Louis life in the early 1800s. The 
museum, which is free, also includes a 
dramatic film presentation on how the 
spectacular arch was built. 

More examples of the city's commit- 
ment to renovation can be found on the 
St. Louis Riverfront, an area blending 
the old and new. Perhaps the most strik- 
ing new attraction on the river is the S. 
S. Admiral. Once the nation's largest 
river excursion boat, it recently was 
given a $35 million renovation and a per- 
manent home on the Mississippi banks. 
Opened in March 1987 with a number of 
unique entertainment and dining attrac- 
tions, the complex did not fare well 
financially and closed. It is slated to re- 
open aroimd May 1. 

Every visitor should tiy to take in a 
short river cruise and no doubt many 
General Conference delegates and 
others will flock to the river on break 
day, Sunday, May 1. Three picturesque 
excursion boats make one-hour trips 
from the levee throughout the day and 
can also be booked for special evening 
events including dinner cruises. These 
are the Huck Finn, the Tom Sawyer and 
the Becky Thatcher. 

Also on the riverfront is the showboat 
Goldenrod, a registered National His- 
toric Landmark, where you can hiss the 
villain and cheer the hero during perfor- 
mances of old-time "meller dramas." 

Authentic ragtime music can be heard 
evenings on the Goldenrod and at other 
places on or near the riverfront. 

Other river attractions include the 
U.S.S. Inaugural #242, a World War U 
minesweeper open to the public ($1.75 
adults, $1.25 children). For the more ad- 
venturous, there are helicopter rides 
which operate from a barge near the 
minesweeper. (NOTE: The roadway 
nmning along the levee is named Leonor 
K. Sullivan Street; however, locals 
probably still will refer to this as Wharf 
Street.) 

Just north of the arch riverfront area 
(other side of Eads Bridge) is Laclede's 
Landing where Pierre Laclede first 
landed 224 years ago. Formerly an area 



of abandoned, decaying warehouses, it 
has since 1977 become a collection of of- 
fices, restaurants, shops and lively loun- 
ges in a 19th century rivertown setting. 

And while you're there, pause a moment 
to take in the splendor of Eads Bridge, 
equally beautiful by day or when il- 
luminated after dark. When local inven- 
tor Jim Eads proposed it around the time 
of the Civil War, critics said the bridge 
couldn't be built. But more than 100 
years later it's still standing, carrying car 
and rail traffic, and proclaimed a Nation- 
al Historic Landmark and an engineer- 
ing-feat of worldwide significance. 

When Eads announced he could build a 
bridge to carry trains and traffic across 
the river, critics scoffed. Among these 
were river lobbyists who sensed a threat 
to steamboat business. Ultimately his 
proposal was the death knell for river 
traffic With completion of Eads bridge 
in 1874, the West was open to railroad 
business. 

Also downtown 

Near the Cervantes Convention Center 
are two of St. Louis' top attractions - 
Union Station and the St. Louis Centre. 

A standout among the city's renovation 
projects. Union Station is a beautiful, 
Romanesque-style train terminal built 
in 1894 and once the busiest in the na- 
tion. The last train departed in 1979 and 
six years later the renovated complex re- 
opened as a splendid festival 
marketplace. It features numerous 
boutiques and unusual shops, an array of 
restaurants and areas for cultural perfor- 
mances. It's a great place to shop for St. 
Louis gifts, to eat and relax, possibly 
hear the sound of a German band at the 
Biergarten, or watch many of the skits 
performed daily on an inside stage. Lo- 
cated at 18th and Market about 19 
blocks from the convention center, 
Union Station would be a brisk walk for 
many folks and a short cab ride for 
others. 

The St. Louis Centre, just two blocks 
from the convention center, is another 
"pride and joy" of the city. An elegant 
place to shop, the $176.5 complex 
opened in 1985 boasting 1.5 million 
square feet of shopping and dining space 
making it the largest enclosed 
downtown shopping mall in the U.S. 
The centre is anchored by two of the 
city's major department stores, Famous- 
Barr and Dillard's. 



10 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



For the sports fans 

Also worth seeing downtown is Busch 
Stadium, just a few blocks west of the 
riverfront, home of the colorful baseball 
Cardinals and not-forgotten football 
Cardinals. At the stadium, sports fans 
will want to visit the St. Louis Hall of 
Fame offering displays and movies on 
baseball, football, basketball, hockey, 
golf, bowling and soccer. Across the 
street is the National Bowling Hall of 
Fame, a museum devoted to the history 
of that sport. 

Also nearby 

A southside attraction many will find 
worth visiting is the Missouri Botanical 
Garden (popularly known as Shaw's 
Garden) with its famous geodesic, 
climate-controlled dome, plus a beauti- 
ful Japanese Garden and other features, 
4344 Shaw Avenue. 

Military buffs can examine 
memorabilia, uniforms, weapons and 
other displays from World Wars I and H, 
the Korean War, etc. at the Soldier's 
Memorial and Military Museum at 13th 
and Chestnut. And at 13th and Olive 
nearby is the Main Public Library, an im- 
pressive stone building in Italian Renais- 
sance splendor. 

If you're seeking a unique European 
flavor and some fresh produce direct 
from the farmer, check-out Soulard 
Market at Lafayette Avenue and 7th 
Street. This particularly is a fun place to 
visit on Saturdays. 

Shopping 

In addition to St. Louis Centre, both 
Famous-Barr and Dillard's have branch 
stores in other parts of the metropolitan 
area. And Plaza Frontenac, Sak's Fifth 
Avenue and Neiman-Marcus head the 
list of upscale stores (consult phone book 
for locations). At St. Louis Galleria, 
Brentwood at Clayton Road, shoppers 
can buy East Coast fashions, eat at any 
one of numerous restaurants and watch 
a movie amidst the mall's beautiful 
Italian marble setting. West Port Plaza, 
in St. Louis County at 1-270 and Page, is 
a collection of shops, restaurants and 
theaters in a beautiful Alpine village set- 
ting. 

Forest Park 

Forest Park, a short drive due west of 
the downtown area on U.S. 40 or via the 
Forest Park Expressway, is one of the 
largest and most beautiful city parks in 
the nation. Ideal for a Sunday afternoon 
visit, it's a cultural community in itself 
with a variety of free or low-cost attrac- 



tions. The 1,300-acre park is home to the 
world renowned St. Louis Zoo, the Jewel 
Box Floral Conservator, Missouri His- 
torical Society (home of the Charles 
Lindberg memorabilia), the St. Louis 
Science Center, the famous MunyOpera 
(not open 'tU summer), the noted St. 
Louis Art Museum, Stienberg skating 
rink and other attractions. The Art 
Museum was the only permanent build- 
ing erected for the 1904 St. Louis 
World's Fair held at Forest Park and is 
the city's legacy of that event. The statue 
fronting the Art Museum is of French 
King Louis DC for whom the city is 
named; it frequently served as the city's 
unofficial symbol until erection of the 
Arch in 1965. 

Near the Forest Park area is 
Washington University, known for its 
School of Medicine and regarded as one 
of the nation's top institutions of higher 
learning. Also adjacent to the park on 
Kingshighway are a number of the 
nation's leading hospitals, including 
Barnes Hospital which has United 
Methodist ties. 

Churches and synagogues 

Houses of worship abound in St. Louis, 
and DCA space permits only a passing 
note. Of particular architectural sig- 
nificance and beauty is the St. Louis 
Cathedral (Roman Catholic), Lindell at 
Newstead, with the finest collection of 
mosaics in the western world. Tours are 
given on Sunday at 1 p.m. There is also 
the Old Cathedral and Museum on the 
riverfront near the Arch; Christ Church 
Cathedral (Episcopalian) 1210 Locust 
downtown; Centenary United 
Methodist Church, Mother Church of St. 
Louis Methodism (at 16th and Pine 
across from Kiel Auditorium, scene of 
the 1970 adjourned General Con- 
ference); and the strikingly-modern 
Temple Israel at Ladue and Spoede 
Roa^ in West St. Louis county. 

Sight Seeing 

While it's unlikely delegates will have 
much sight-seeing time, there are none- 
theless a number of worthwhile metro 
area attractions within a relatively short 
drive from downtown. These include the 
National Musuem of Transport; Grant's 
Farm (call for reservations); Six Flags 
Over Mid-America at Eureka on 1-44; 
Jefferson Barracks at Broadway & 
Kingston, a historic military post with 
the USA's second-largest National 
Cemetery; and the Wabash, Frisco & 
Pacific Narrow Gauge Railroad at Glen- 
coe. For aviation/space buffs, there's 
the McDonnell Douglass Prologue 



Room. The aerospace, electronic and 
computer giant is the state's largest 
employer. 

Other county attractions include Faust 
County Park featuring a restored 
carousel, one of only 10 extant carousels 
handmade by the Dentzel Co. The park 
also includes Thonhill, restored home of 
Missouri's second governor. 

Also worth seeing in St. Louis Coimty - 
Laumeier Sculpture Park and Golden 
Eagle Riverboat Museum. 

St. Charles 

A short drive north on 1-70 across the 
Missouri River takes you to St. Charles. 
Although enjoying monumental growth, 
the city has preserved its historic river- 
town heritage on South Main Street with 
more than 60 charming shops, antique 
stores and restaurants. History buffs will 
wish to see the first state capitol of Mis- 
souri on South Main, used from 1821 to 
1826. 

East-Side 

The Illinois side of the Mississippi was 
actually settled before St. Louis. In more 
recent times, much of the metro area's 
heavy industry (and air pollution) has 
centered in East St. Louis. The East Side 
sometimes has been known as the "St. 
Louis safety-valve" - with its later bar 
closings, horse racing and other 
proclivities not normally addressed in 
church journals. 

Those in the mood to get away for a Sun- 
day afternoon drive might wish to head 
up to Alton, ni., along the Great River 
Road for a look at the Alton Dam and 
Locks, a visit to quaint Elsah and then 
on to beautiful Pere Marquette State 
Park. 

Our DCA listing covers only St. Louis 
area "high points" - consult readily- 
available tourist and information guides 
for specific information, times, prices, 
etc. There is a tourist information center 
on the riverfront. And the St. Louis Con- 
vention and Visitors Commission is lo- 
cated at 10 S. Broadway, Suite 300 - 
phone 421-1023. 

—James Steele 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



11 



St. Louis Attractions 



Campbell House - 1508 Locust (421- 
0325) $2 adults, $.50 children 



Gateway Arch - Riverfront Area (425- 
4465) $2.50 adults, $.50 children 



Laumeier Sculpture Park - Geyer & 
Rett Roads (821-1209) Free 



Cathedral of St. Louis - Lindell Blvd & 
Newstead Ave (533-2824) Free 

Chatillon-DeMenil - 3352 DeMenil 
Place (771-5828) $1.50 adults, $.50 
children 

Craft Alliance Gallery - 6640 Delmar 
Blvd (call for reservation; 725-1 151) Free 

Eugene Field House & Toy Museum - 
634 South Broadway (421-4689) $1.50 
adults, $.50 children 

First State Capitol - 208-214 Main 
Street (723-3256) $1.25 adults, $.75 
children 



General Daniel Bissell House - 10225 
Bellefontaine (868-0973) $1 adults, $.50 
children 

Golden Eagle Riverboat Museum - Bee 
Tree Park, Highway 270 (846-9073) Free 

Hanley House - 7600 Westmoreland 
(727-8100) -$1 adults, $.50 children 

Hawken House - 1115 Rock Hill Rd. - 
(968-1857) $1.50 adults, $.50 chUdren 

Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and Becky 
Thatcher Riverboats, Riverfront (621- 
4040) $5.75 adults, $2.75 children 

Kramer's Marionnetes - 4143 Laclede 
(531-3313) $2.50 adults, $2 children 




Magic House - 516 S. Kirkwood Rd. 
(822-8900) $2.50 adults, $2 children 

Mercantile Money Museum - Seventh 
& Washington Sts. (call for reservation; 
425-4465) Free 

Missouri Botanical Garden - 4344 
Shaw (577-5100) $1 per person 

Museum of Transport - 3105 Barrett 
Station Rd. (965-7998) $2 adults, $1 
children 

Museum of Westward Expansion - 
Gateway Arch (425-4465) Free 

National Bowling Hall of Fame & 
Museum - 111 Stadium Plaza (231-6340) $3 
adults, $1.50 children 

Old Cathedral - Second and Walnut 
(231-3250) Free - Museum $.25 

Old Courthouse - 11 North Fourth St. 
(425-4465) Free 

St. Louis Art Museum - Forest Park 
(721-0067) Free 

St. Louis Carousel - Faust Park (889- 
3356) $1 adults, $.50 children 

St. Louis Science Center - Forest Park 
(289-4400) Free 

St. Louis Sports - Busch Stadium (421- 
FAME) $2 adults, $1.50 chidlren 

St. Louis Zoo - Forest Park (781-0900) 
Free 

Sappington House - 1015 Sappington 
Rd. (966-4700) $1 adults, $.50 children 

Soldiers' Memorial Military Museum - 
1315 Chestnut (662-4550) Free 

Taille De Noyer Home - 1869 South 
Florissant Rd. (524-1100) $1.50 adults, 
$.50 children 

Wabash, Frisco & Pacific Miniature 
RaUway - Grand Avenue (587-3538) $1.50 
adults, children under 3 Free 

U.S.S. Inaugural #242 - 400 Leonor K. 
(421-15U) $1.75 adults, $1.25 chUdren 



The Gateway Arch halo's the Old Cathedral, the oldest cathedral west of the Mississippi, in the 
Jefferson Memorial area In St. Louis. 



12 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 





St. Louis Scenes 

GENERAL CONFERENCE delegates and visitors will find far more to do and see 
in St. Louis than time will permit. These photos, courtesy of the St. Louis Conven- 
tion and Visitors Commission, give a sampling of the Gateway City's many attrac- 
tions, clockwise from top left: HISTORIC EADS BRIDGE spans the Mississippi from 
Illinois to Missouri with the magnificant Gateway Arch framed between the water 
and the bridge's first arch; DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT is a backdrop for a 
variety of Riverfront attractions; exterior and interior views of the recently-opened 
festival marketplace UNION STATION, 18th and Market; the world-famous ST. 
LOUIS ZOO in Forest Park with more than 2,800 naturalistic exhibits {it's free!); 
the MUSEUM OF TRANSPORT on Barrett Station Road near Kirkwood (St. Louis 
county) gives visitors an opportunity to re-live 1 50 years of railroad history; this 18- 
story, 180-ton gaint ferris wheel is one of many exciting rides at SIX FLAGS OVER 
MID-AMERICA on 1-44 about 30 miles southwest of St. Louis; the ST. LOUIS 
CENTRE, just a few blocks from the Convention Center, is a 100-store shopping 
mall in the heart of downtown with four levels of speciality stores and a food court 
with 20 different restaurants; the LAUMIER SCULPTURE PARK features 50 works 
of art, 100 acres of beautiful grounds, Geyer and Rott Roads in St. Louis County; 
and the largest traditional Japanese garden in North America is part of the MIS- 
SOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN on Shaw Avenue on the near South Side of St. Louis. 
-JAMES STEELE PHOTO LAYOUT 




April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



13 










14 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



St. Louis United Methodism Today 

St. Louis is a city of contrasts, a new- 
old metropolis looking back on days of 
glory, yet yearning for reincarnation 
into a new heyday. Its location at the 
junction of river and rail transportation 
brought it successive waves of ethnic 
migrations in days past. Its present ac- 
cessibility has kept its population fluid. 
The rigid city boundary has meant a loss 
of population in St. Louis per se, al- 
though the metropolitan area has con- 
tinued to burgeon to nearly 2 1/2 mil- 
lion. The shift of wealth and commerce 
to the suburbs is an old story oft 
repeated, and the problems of dual 
governance are not entirely unique. But 
through it all the city has kept its iden- 
tity as a center of culture, its visual and 
performing arts a source of pride. Its zoo, 
botanical gardens, museums and 
baseball team have all drawn their share 
of visitors, and the Gateway Arch has be- 
come the symbol of urban rejuvenation. 

Two Districts 

The United Methodist Church in 
today's St. Louis is divided into two dis- 
tricts out of seven in the Missouri East 
Conference. Together they represent 
about 40 percent of the conference mem- 
bership and half of the clergy appoint- 
ments. Geographically the St. Louis 
South District covers the southern half 
of St. Louis City and St. Louis County, 
Jefferson County and three-fourths of 
Franklin County. The St. Louis North 
District, in addition to its half of St. 
Louis City and County, includes St. 
Charles County and parts of Lincoln and 
Warren counties. This means each dis- 
trict has a mix of urban, suburban and 
rural churches within a 50 mile radius of 
the city center. Highway 40, running 
east-west, is the dividing line between 
the districts. 

Four Agencies 

The four major church supported 
agencies are all technically in the South 
District, but are equally supported by the 
churches of both districts. These institu- 
tions are Epworth Children's Home, a 
residential treatment center for dis- 
turbed, abused and neglected teenagers; 
Gambrill Gardens, a partially govern- 
ment-subsidized retirement community; 
Kingdom House, a community center 
that has served the near southside for 
more than 85 years; and United 
Methodist Metro Ministry, a somewhat 
mobile mid-city agency that includes 
legal, housing and job assistance, along 
with direct services. 




CENTENARY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH across from Union Station downtown at 16th and 
Pine, could be termed the Mother Church of United Methodism in St. Louis. The congregation 
was organized in 1839 and the present church built in 1869. The structure was one of a handful 
of buildings left standing when the city launched a massive urban renewal program in the late 
1950s. It continues as one of the landmarks in the redeveloped area stretching from the Missis- 
sippi River through the downtown commercial district westward to Union Station. 



South District Superintendent C. 
Clark Leonard characterizes St. Louis as 
a progressive city, but feels that the chur- 
ches have not yet caught the progressive 
spirit. South St. Louis has long been a 
static area but mobility there is begin- 
ning to pick up. 

One experiment in church renewal 
which seems to be working is the South 
City Coooperative Ministry in which six 
older churches have banded together for 
strength and support. Three full-time 
pastors serve the six churches in linked 
pairs; other staff specialists are shared 
and some programming is shared. Semi- 
nary students and a diaconal minister as- 
sist in program for the churches that 
most could not afford alone. Leonard 
says this has stopped membership 
erosion and helped these churches stay 
alive. 



Mobility in the North St. Louis district 
has been so swift and the situation so 
fluid it has been hard to keep up with 
developing problems, according to Su- 
perintendent Richard J. Detweiler. He 
feels that some sort of grouping will be 
necessary for some of the Black churches 
to catch a vision of the future. Eleven of 
the 55 North District churches are 
predominantly Black churches, three of 
them in rural settings. (By contrast there 
are only three Black and one Korean 
church numbered among the 56 South 
District congregations.) Integration has 
been a strong emphasis in the Northern 
district and nearly a dozen of the 
predominantly white churches have 
Black members, some in strong leader- 
ship positions. So far only one cross-cul- 
tural appointment has been attempted, 
although several of the outlying charges 
link a Black and a white church. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



15 



Nine Bishops from state 

At least nine bishops have been elected 
from Missouri - most recently, Charles C. 
Selecman, Ivan Lee Holt, Monk Bryan 
and Louis W. Schowengerdt. Other Mis- 
souri clergy and laypersons have played 
prominent roles in the denomination's 
boards and agencies. 

Missourians joined other Methodists in 
the changing outlook of theology in the 
1920s. For example, the Rev. Walter 
Hearn, born in Soochow, China, of 
Southern Methodist missionary parents, 
was challenged as unorthodox by other 
missionaries. After being called back to 
the United States, he began a 25-year 
career as professor in what then was the 
Missouri Bible College in Columbia. 

The state has been the scene of a num- 
ber of sessions of the top legislative as- 
semblies of the United Methodist Church 
and predecessor bodies. The Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South's General Con- 
ference met in St. Louis in 1850 and 1890; 
the Methodist Protestant (leneral Con- 
ference was held in Kansas City in 1896; 
the Methodist Episcopal General Con- 
ference met there in 1928. 

In 1939, the Uniting Conference for the 
three Methodist bodies was held in Kan- 
sas City; a plaque in that city's mimicipal 
auditorium commemorates the historic 
occasion. The Methodist Church's 1944 
General Conference was held in the same 
place, and an adjourned session of the 
United Methodist General Conference 
was held in St. Louis in 1970. The latter 
session made history when it was ter- 
minated for lack of a quorum of delegates. 

Area Connections 

No overview of United Methodism in 
St. Louis today would be complete 
without noting its ties with the 
denomination in the remainder of the 
"Show Me State." 

The city is home to the Missouri Area 
resident bishop, currently W. T. Handy, 
who has served since 1980. Bishop 
Handy's office is housed within an ofTice 
building on Lindell Boulevard just east 
of the Chase-Park Plaza Hotel near 
Forest Park. That facility also houses the 
Missouri East Conference Council Of- 
fice, the two St. Louis district supertin- 
dents, the conference treasurer, and 
others. Currently a fund drive is under- 
way to erect a conference-area head- 
quarters building in St. Louis County 
which is expected to be more accessible 
to other parts of the state. 



The Missouri Area, which took on its 
current conference configuration in the 
early 1960s, traces its denominational 
roots to 1816. It is now divided on a 
north-south line which runs just west of 
Columbia, home of the University of 
Missouri and the location for many 
statewide United Methodist meetings. 

The Missouri West Conference, which 
is the larger of the two, has its council of- 
fice in Kansas City adjacent to Saint Paul 
School of Theology. The conference 
headquarters includes an office for 
Bishop Handy's use when he is in the 
city. 

Today the Missouri Area counts ap- 
proximately 213,000 church members - 
93,500 in the East Conference and 
119,400 in the West Conference. There 
are about 1,000 congregations, of which 
3,000 member Manchester United 
Methodist Church in west St. Louis 
County is the largest. 

Institutions 

Both conferences share in the support 
of Central Methodist College in Fayette, 
located about 30 miles northwest of 
Colimibia. Established in 1857, it over 
the years absorbed a number of smaller 
colleges. CMC is the meeting place for 
both the Missouri East and West Annual 
Conferences. Formerly simply Central 
College, it took its current name in 1961. 

Other institutions connected with the 
church in Missouri include United 
Methodist Children and Family Services 
in St. Louis, Ozarks Methodist Manor in 
Marionville, and Batnes Hospital in St. 
Louis. 

The two conferences also support the 
Area Office of Creative Ministries which 
has been best known for its development 
and promotion of the TRAG vehicle. 



General Conference 

audio and video 

resources available 

at sales booth 

outside UM 

Publishing House 

display. 



widely used in Third World mission set- 
tings. 

The state also is the site of an official 
United Methodist national historic 
shrine -Old McKendree Chapel. 
Believed to be the oldest Protestant 
church building standing west of the 
Mississippi River, it is located in the 
southeast part of the state near Cape 
Girardeau. Built in 1819 and restored in 
1977, it stands in a grove of trees and is 
protected from the weather by a steel 
canopy. 

Ecumenical Ties 

One of the most notable attributes of 
the United Methodist Church in St. Louis 
and elsewhere around the state has been 
its ecumenical stance; it has shown a will- 
ingness to work with other denomina- 
tions to accomplish goals of benefit to the 
community. Whenever help is needed 
from the religious community, it's a 
foregone conclusion that United 
Methodists will be involved, likely in a 
leadership role. Sometimes this strength 
becomes a weakness when it comes to 
projecting or maintaining a presence that 
the secular world can recognize. St. Louis 
United Methodists are hopeful that the 
General Conference will leave a positive 
image in its wake. 



Dulci McCoy/Walter Vernon/Jamcs Stcclr 



EMERGENCY INFORMATION 

The Convention Center First Aid 
Center is located in Room 114 off the 
main lobby on the west side of the first 
level. 

Dial 5056 on the house phone or 342- 
5056 from a pay or outside phone. 

FOOD SERVICE 

Cafeteria food service for delegates and 
visitors will be available each day except 
Sunday, May 1, in Hall A of the Conven- 
tion Center. 

Continental breakfast will be served 
from 7:30 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. Sweet 
rolls, doughnuts, juices, fresh fruit and 
beverages will be available. 

Lunch will be served from 11:00 a.m. to 
2:30 p.m. Hot entree, cold sandwiches 
and assorted salads will be available. 

In addition, concession stands will be 
open at various times during the con- 
ference to serve the conference atten- 
dees. 



16 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



St. Louis prepares for visitors 

Local United Methodists began making plans early in '87 



"Where do we rent wastebaskets?" 

"How many gallons of cofFee do we need 
to order each day?" 

This is just a sampling of thousands of 
detaOs facing a local General Conference 
arrangements committee. And for more 
than a year, a group of local St. Louis 
United Methodists have been doing just 
that and more. 

"Nearly 300 church folks from across 
the Missouri East Conference have been 
involved in the effort and this doesn't 
count the cookie bakers," Missouri East 
Council Director Paul Schlapbach of St. 
Louis, one of the key persons coordinat- 
ing local arrangements. "We organized in 
January of 1987 with three divisional 
chairpersons, each with seven or more 
coordinators to oversee specific areas," 
he added. 

Heading the effort is Gregory K Poole, 
a former Missouri East Council director 
and now director of the Missouri United 
Methodist Foundation. A seasoned ad- 
ministrator, Poole has been determined 
that local arrangements will not be a 
one-person show. "Each of the three 
division heads has a pretty good over- 
view of the local arrangements, in addi- 
tion to myself," Poole said. "If anything 



should happen to one person, others 
would be able to step in," he commented. 

Poole, who also serves as administra- 
tive assistant to Missouri Area Bishop W. 
T. Handy, reviewed files from the 1984 
Baltimore Conference and the 1980 In- 
dianapolis event in preparing to welcome 
thousands of United Methodists to the 
Gateway City in 1988. 

Working with the St. Louis group has 
been General Conference business 
manager DeWayne S. Woodring of In- 
dianapolis, a veteran of three previous 
quadrennial gatherings. "The Commis- 
sion on the General Conference depends 
greatly on the local committee to provide 
many of the services required during the 
time of the world-wide event," he ex- 
plained. "The behind-the-scenes work 
performed by host area United 
Methodists not only means much to 
those attending the conference, it is also 
personally meaningful to those local 
church members involved since they 
have the opportunity to actively par- 
ticipate in operation of the top law and 
policy-making body of their denomina- 
tion," Woodring added. 



Cookie Patrol 

You read it in the DCA first-Missouri 
East United Methodist have set up what 
may be the denomination's first-ever 
"cookie patrol." "Each one of the 
conference's seven districts is assigned 
to provide cookies on one or more days 
of the conference," noted council direc- 
tor Schlapbach." Within each district, 
the district lay leader is responsible for 
mobilizing the 'cookie patrol' as vans cir- 
culate throughout the region picking up 
cookies the day before," he continued. 

Providing cookies for the delegates' 
lounge, the news room and elsewhere (as 
in past conferences) will be no small un- 
dertaking. "We're figuring on at least 625 
dozen cookies needed for each day of the 
conference," reported refreshment coor- 
dinator Martha Ann Smith, a layperson 
from Canton, Mo. 

Catholics Assist 

Ecumenical cooperation has been one 
of the joys for the local committee. Par- 
ticularly significant is the contribution 
of St. Louis Roman Catholics, who have 
made available St. Patrick's Church 
across from the Convention Center for 
afternoon concerts and worship services. 




KEY MEMBERS of the local arrangements committee at St. Louis, from left: Gregory K. Poole, 
chairman; Warren Meyer, hospitality; Nancy McMullin, treasurer; Paul Schlapbach, program; 
and Robert Williams, staffing and equipment. 
-Dulci McCoy Photo 



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Display. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



17 



Facilities 

General Conference delegates and 
visitors are expected to be favorably im- 
pressed with the St. Louis Cervantes 
Convention Center, according to Woodr- 
ing. Opened in 1977, it will permit all 
conference activity to take place under 
one roof. (At Baltimore in 1984, legisla- 
tive committee sessions were held in a 
facility several blocks from the main con- 
vention center.) 

This doesn't mean there haven't been 
problems. In addition to unexpected 
hotel closings, the convention center es- 
calator will be out of service. According 
to Schlapbach, it is being replaced with 
a new "people mover" device; however, 
the work was not completed in time for 
use by this gathering. Although elevators 
are available for persons with handicap- 
ping conditions, most delegates and 
visitors will have to troop up a temporary 
wooden staircase when going to second- 
floor meeting rooms. 

Those persons who must deal with on- 
site activities at the center also have be- 
come sensitive to St. Louis' strong union 
regulations. For example, anything 
which can be carried into the building 
under one's arm is "OK," but if it requires 
moving by two or more persons, you'd 
better call the Teamsters! 

St. Louis UMs also have learned first- 
hand about the high cost of serving cof- 
fee at the center. Missouri East 
Treasurer Nancy McMullin, herself a 
seasoned veteran of many General Con- 
ferences, reports a single complimentary 
coffee break costs more than $1,000. 

A long list 

Several m^or events which the local 
committee planned for the conference 
include: last night's innovative Bishops' 
Reception using as its theme the 1904 St. 
Louis World's Fair; a reception for 
bishops' spouses at the episcopal 
residence of Bishop W. T. and Ruth 
Handy; the opening Service of Holy 
Communion; and assembling a 450-voice 
choir of youth and adults to be led by 
Carlton R. Young in introducing the new 
hymnal tonight. Also included have been 
plans for bus tours of the metropolitan 
area and arrangements for the Missouri 
Area Event May 1, titled "Through 
Church Windows." 

As one of the three divisional chairper- 
sons of the local committee, Schlapbach 
heads the program division. The other 
two division heads are laypersons. War- 



ren Meyer, in charge of hospitality, is a 
retired executive with the Southwestern 
Bell Telephone Co. Robert Williams, 
who heads the staffing and equipment 
division, is an executive in supply and 
management logistics with the Depart- 
ment of Defense. Those three, along with 
Poole and McMullin, are the key persons 
heading local arrangements. 

THE PROGRAM DIVISION includes 
communion stewards and servers, the 
bishops' reception, the Missouri Area 
Event, preaching assignments, com- 
munications, music assistance, and the 
bishops' spouses reception. 

THE STAFFING AND EQUIPMENT 
DIVISION includes convention services, 
equipment, translators, secretarial per- 
sonnel, first aid and health support, post- 
al services, and badges and packets. 

THE HOSPITAUTY DIVISION in- 
cludes supplemental housing, outside 
security, information and message cen- 
ter, delegates' lounge, local transporta- 
tion and taxiing, refreshments, airport 
welcoming, and Council of Bishops 
hospitality. 



-James H. Steele 



Episcopal and Lay 

Addresses Available 

on Audiotape. 

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outside UM 

Publishing House 

Display. 



SECTIONS OF THE 1988 ADVANCE DAILY 
CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 

A Handbook of Delegates 

B Plan of Oranization and Rules of Order 

C Proposed Changes in the Book of Discipline received from general agencies, 
annud conferences and special groups listed under E, plus an introduction 
and list of officially noted errata in 1984 Discipline 

D-1 Position Statements proposed for Book of Resolutions 

D-2 Resolutions from general agencies and annual conferences 

E Reports and Recommendations from Special Groups to report to General 
Conference and related resolutions from annual conferences 

F Reports and Recommendations from general agencies (other than GCFA 
and GCOM) and related resolutions from annual conferences 

G Reports and Recommendations from the General Council on Ministries 

H-1 Reports and Recommendations from the General Council on Finance 
and Administration 

H-2 Quadrennial Financial Statement 

I The United Methodist Hymnal 



18 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



A Grain of Mustard Seed 

The Beginnings of Methodism in Missouri 



George Washington was still President 
of the United States and Missouri was 
part of Spanish Louisiana when the first 
Methodist services were held within its 
borders. Tradition says that, because no 
Protestant minister was allowed in 
Louisiana, John Clark stood on a rock in 
the Mississippi River to preach. More 
likely, he was ferried across the river at 
night by canoe. He rode through the 
forests to a settler's cabin, where there 
was preaching and prayer service till 
nearly dawn. Then he slipped back 
across the river to United States ter- 
ritory in Illinois. 

In 1804, the same year that Mr. 
Jefferson's ambassadors bought 
Louisiana from Napoleon, Joseph Ogles- 
by was appointed to the Illinois Circuit 
and told to cross into Missouri to see 
what the prospects were for Methodist 
work. Oglesby traveled up the Missouri 
River as far as the Femme Osage, where 
he spent some time with the Spanish-ap- 
pointed judge of the territory, Daniel 
Boone. Boone was not sympathetic to 
his mission, but Oglesby still reported to 
the Western Conference session of 1806 
that there were 200 prospects for 
Methodist work in Missouri That was a 
daring statement, since there were only 
200 English speaking people in Missouri! 
But the circuit riders never lacked for op- 



On the basis of Oglesby 's report, John 
Travis was appointed to the "Missourie" 
Circuit, which existed only on the list of 
appointments. A year later he reported 
two circuits, the Missouri and the 
Meramec The Missouri Circuit had fifty- 
six members, the Meramec fifty, of 
whom six were black. 

William McKendree, the presiding 
elder of the Cumberland District, made 
a tour of Missouri in the summer of 1807 
and took part in a camp meeting near 
Coldwater. This was the first camp meet- 
ing west of the Mississippi, and also the 
site of the first service of Holy Com- 
munion celebrated by Methodists in Mis- 
souri Tradition says that corn bread and 
polk-berry juice, sweetened with maple 
sugar, were used for the elements. It 
seems clear that McKendree did 
celebrate the Lord's Supper at this camp 
meeting and that com bread was, in- 
deed, used to symbolize the Body of the 
Lord. But polk-beriy juice was used 
mainly as an ingredient in ink, it was 
mildly toxic, and, sweetened, with maple 




OLD MCKENDREE CHAPEL 



sugar, tasted awful! Still, the story 
stands as a firm part of Missouri 
Methodist tradition. 

The Sunday school began as a part of 
Missouri Methodism even before circuits 
were organized. In late 1804 or early 
1805, Mrs. Sarah Barton Murphy and 
her family arrived near what is now Far- 
mington. Joseph Oglesby visited her on 
his tour in 1805 and returned in 1809 to 
organize the Methodist class. In the 
meantime Mrs. Murphy had organized a 
Sunday school where she taught the 
children of the area to read and write, 
add and subtract. In a day when books 
were dear, her reading text was the 
Bible. 

Three events of national importance 
fell between the founding of the first cir- 
cuits and the organization of the Mis- 
souri Conference in 1816. The New 
Madrid earthquake in 18 1 1, and the War 
of 1812-1814, brought many new con- 
verts into the churches as a result of the 
widespread fear they caused. The grant- 
ing of territorial status to Missouri in 
early 1816 was more benign, but would 
also ultimately lead to growth in the 
church. One month later, the General 
Conference brought into being the Mis- 
souri Conference. 

That first Missouri Conference in- 
cluded Illinois, Indiana, and Arkansas, 
as well as Missouri. Its western bound- 
ary was fixed as "the remotest cabin 
toward the setting sun." The very 
description of conference boundaries 
was a ringing call to mission and out- 
reach. The circuit riders moved in all 
directions. In 1813, William Stevenson 
heard a "Macedonian call" and preached 
the first Methodist sermon in Arkansas. 



By 1815, he had organized a circuit in 
that state, and was already preaching the 
first Methodist sermon in Texas, at 
Pecan Point. Pecan Point was added to 
the appointments of the Missouri Con- 
ference in 1818. But Stevenson's work 
had only begun. He held the first Protes- 
tant service in Oklahoma in 1815, and 
organized a circuit in Louisiana in 1825. 
A mission to the Kansas and Shawnee 
Indians was begun by William and 
Thomas Johnson in 1830. In 1849 Ger- 
man-speaking Methodists in St. Louis 
sent Ludwig Jacoby back to Germany to 
begin Methodist work there. 

Missouri became literally a "Mother of 
Conferences." From the first optimistic 
report of Joseph Oglesby the work 
spread until twenty-one present day con- 
ferences, plus the Methodist Church in 
Grermany, as descended from the Mis- 
siouri Conference in 1816 

-John O. Gooch 



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Conference Home 

with You. 

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and audio resources 

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play. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



19 



(INCSHICHWAY aiVO 



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1. 


Sheraton St. Louis 


2. 


Radisson St. Louis 


3. 


Day's Inn at the Arch 


4. 


Holiday Inn Riverfront 


5. 


Adam's Mark 


6. 


Clarion Hotel 


7. 


Marriott Pavilion 



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Downtown St. Louis 

All conference sessions will be held at the 

Cervantes Convention & Exhibition 

Center ("A" on the map). 




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20 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



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April 26 


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DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 


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Biihopi 100 Radio Recording 117 


Biihop.' SpouM. 126 R.f.r.l.M Committ« 122 


Choir Robing Exhibit H.11 C Regi.tr«r HI 


CommiHion on Central Conference Afiaira 126 Registration and Information Lobby 


Commiuion on the General Conference 116 Resource Uterature Center Exhibit Hall A 


Commimicatioiu 132 Secretary, CJeneral Conference 122 


Conferences— Legislative Committee 124 Secretarial Staff 121 


Correlation and Editorial Review 119 Tellers Exhibit Hall B 


Credentials 113 Video Production Dressing Room. A & B 


Daily Christian Advocate 1?7 


Daily Christian Advocate Sales Exhibit Hall A Second Floor 


Delegate Lounge Exhibit Hall A Agenda Committee 264 


First Aid 114 Calendar Committee 263 


Food Service Exhibit Hall A Church and Society - Legislative Committee 276 


Oenerml Administration — Committee on Courtesies & Privileges 262 


Legislative Committee 123 Independent Commissiona^Judicial 


Higher EducstionADhaplaincy — Adminsitration — Ugislative Committee 264 


Legislative Committee 120 Committee on Presiding Offices 268 


Information, Message Center, Diecipleahip — Legislative Committee 274 


Lost and Found Lobby Faith and Mission - Legislative Committee 263,267 


Local Church— LegisUtive Committee 130 Financial Administration — 


Local Committee 116 Ugislative Committee 276 


Marshals and Pages Exhibit Hall C General Agencies 273 


Newscope 110 General Council on Finance and Administration 271 


Ordained/Diaconal Ministry Global Ministries — UgislsUve Committee 261,262,266.266 


Legislative Committee 131 Judicial Council 260 


Plenary Sessions Halls B * C Meeting Rooms 260,270 


Post Office Lobby Prayer Room 266 


Publishing HouM Fihihit Hall A . Tr«*iui«r, General Conference 272 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



ROUNDUPEHnPN 

• 1988 GENERAL CONFERENCE • 



A TIMELY 
SUMMARY OF 
GENERAL 
CONFERENCE 
ACTIONS 



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UNITED METHODISTS 

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ROUNDUP EDITION of The 
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352-9 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



23 



Additions & Corrections to 
Advance Editions 

Corrections to Advance Edition - Section A 



standing Administrative Committees (A-13) 
Committee on Reference 

Remove: Cathy Lashford; replacement to be appointed 

Standing Legislative Committees 
Church and Society (A- 17) 

Remove: Barrett, Nelda - Central Texas 

Tulloch, Julie - Western PA 

Add: Carroll, B. F. - Central Texas 

Ernst, Sally - Western PA 

Park, Pong Bae - Korea 

Conferences (A-18) 

Remove: Jordan, Bert - Mississippi 

Discipleship (A-18) 

Add: de Giordano, Dora M. - Argentina 

Kim, Tae Yun - Korea 

Faith and Mission (A- 19) 

Add: Lee, Sung Bin - Korea 

da Silveira, Joao Augusto E - Angola 

General Administration (A-21) 

Remove: Carroll, B. F. - Central Texas 

Goldsmith, Stanley I. - Virginia 

Add: Bergdoll, James R. - Virginia 

Global Ministries (A-22) 

Remove: Ernst, Sally - Western PA 

Hanula, Lajos - Hungary 

Add: Czernak, Eva - Hungary 

Tulloch, Julie - Western PA 

Local Church (A-24) 

Add: Manuel, Filipe Martins Sebastiao, 

Angola 

Pace, Kimberly - Mississippi 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry (A-25) 

Add: Dahl, Dorothy M. - Central Texas 



Voting and Reserve Delegates 

Central Illinois Annual Conference (A-30) 

Correct name: Bogart, J. Ronald 

Central Texas Annual Conference (A-31) 

Remove: Barret, Nelda (resigned) 

Add at end of reserve list: 

Cope, Mary Gean; associate conference council director; 464 

Bailey Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76107 



Eastern Angola Annual Conference (A-33) 

'Manuel, Filipe Martins Sebastiao (10); pastor; C. P. 9. 

Malange, Angola 

da Silveira, Joao Augusto (4); farmer; C. P. 9, Malange, 

Angola 

Reserves: Fina, Alberto; district superintendent; C.P. 9, 

Malange, Angola 

Quissua, Ribeiro; pastor; C.P. 9, Malange, Angola 

Neto, Luis Alberto; public worker; C.P. 9, Malange, Angola 

Afonso, Domingas; teacher; C.P. 9, Malange, Angola 

Mississippi Annual Conference (A-43) 

Add at end of reserve list: 

Youngblood, Edward; gas-pipe line company employee; Rt. 

1, MeadvUle, MS 19653 

Troy Annual Conference (A-62) 

Remove: Woodman, William (deceased) 

Add at end of reserve list: 

Civalier, Iris; homemaker; Rt 1, Box 49, Olmsteadville, NY 

12857 

Virginia Annual Conference (A-63) 

Remove: Goldsmith, Stanley L (resigned) 

Add at end of reserve list: 

Huber, Paul W.; retired aero-space engineer; 2 Edgewood 

Drive, Newport News, VA 23606 

Non- Voting Delegates 

Iglesia Evangelica Metodista de Costa 

Rica (2) 

Sec. B. Row 22, Seats 1-2 

Morales, Fernando (); pastor; Apartado 461, 1100 Tib s, 

Costa Rica 

Vargas, R. Kenneth (); Urb. Ciruelas 1-14, Al^uela, Costa 

Rica 

The Methodist Church, Hong Kong (2) 

Sec. B. Row 22, Seats 3-4 

Li, Pong-kwong (); pastor; 54 Waterloo Road, Yau Ma Tei, 

Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Lin, David Huo-fu (); 12/F, Fontana Gardens, 16 Ka Ning 

Path, Tai Hang, Hong Kong 

Gereja Methodist Indonesia (2) 

Sec. A. Row 22, Seats 11-12 

Tambunan, R. P. M. (); district superintendent; Jalan Hang 

Tuah 8, Medan, Indonesia 

Hutauruk, Laurentius (), PKMI, Jalan Hang Tuah 8, 

Medan, Indonesia 



24 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



Corrections to Advance Edition - Section A (cont.) 



The Korean Methodist Church (3) (A-70) 

Add: Lee, Sung Bin (4); homemaker; 849-2 Ang Yan 2 Dong 
(5 Tong 4 Ban) Ahn Yang City, Kyungido 430-012, Korea 



Alphabetical List of Voting Delegates and First Reserves 

(4) Eastern Angola 



(10) Eastern Angola 



Remove: Bang-asan, Clemente C. (resigned) 

Barrett, Nelda (resigned) 

Goldsmith, Stanley I. (resigned) 

Jordan, Bert (deceased) 

Woodman, William (deceased) 

Add: Auvenhine, Bill Central Texas 

Bailen, Gregorio R Northwest 

Philippines 

Add: Carr, Jimmy Mississippi 

da Silveira, Joao Augusto 

Corrections to Advance Edition 



Dowdy, Roger C Virginia 
Fina, Alberto Eastern Angola 
Manuel, Filipe Martins Sebastiao 

. Neto, Luis Alberto Eastern Angola 
, Trost, Alice Troy 



Section C 



Pet. No. 1131MN509D 

Correction to page C-61 

Amend Par. 509.1b and the first paragraph of Par. 509.2e by 
deleting the reference to housing allowance, and to make 
their wording identical. Amend the first sentence of Par. 
509.1c) to provide flexibility in the compensation of retired 
bishops on special assignments. Amend Par. 509.2a) to be 
more comparable with similar provisions for other clergy. 
Delete all of Par. 509.2e) after the first sentence; provisions 
governing special assignments for retired bishops will then 
apply to bishops under mandatory retirement. 

(Other portions of Par. 509 would remain unchanged.) 

lb) Pension and hou s ing allowanc e as approved by the 
General Conference shall be payable on September 1 follow- 
ing the close of the Jurisdictional Conference. 

Ic) If, however, the retired bishop accepts any one of the fol- 
lowing assignments of church-wide responsibility, the 
General Council on Finance and Administration, after con- 
sultation with the Council of Bishops, shall set a level of com- 
pensation not to exceed a maximum determined by the 
General Conference on recommendation of the 
General Coimcil on Finance and Administration-75% 
of tho s alary of an activo bi s hopi 

(The remainder of Par. 509. Ic) would remain unchanged.) 

2. Voluntary Retirement. -a) Bishops who have completed 
twenty years or more of service under full-time appointment 
as-e)4eF-ministers, or as local pastors with pension 
credit, prior to the opening date of the session of the 
Jurisdictional Conference, including at least one quadren- 
nium as bishop, may request the Jurisdictional Conference to 
placo thorn in tho rotirod rolation retire them with the 
privilege of receiving their pension as determined by the 
General Council on Finance and Administration, payment 
of which may begin the first of any month when such 
payments would be permissible under the provisions 
of the Ministerial Pension Plan. If the bishop has not 
reached age sixty-five or completed forty years of ser- 
vice at the time of retirement, the pension benefit for 
years of service prior to January 1, 1982, may be ac- 



tuarially reduced as provided under guidelines 
adopted by the General Conference. 

2e) Pension and hou s ing allowanco as approved by the 
General Conference shall be payable on September l-tb« 
first day of tho following month after the dose of the Jurisdic- 
tional or Control Conference. 

(The remainder of Par. 509.2e), which is identical in word- 
ing with Par. 509.1c), would be deleted.) 

The above petition was adopted by vote of the General Coim- 
cil on Finance and Administration on December 2, 1987. 



Pet. No. 1140FA735D 

Correction to Page C83 

The Errata to the 1984 Book of Discipline diiTers from the 
printed Z?iscip/me in the introduction to Par. 735.2; amend 
the version found in the Errata so that it will read as in the 
printed Discipline. Also amend Par. 735.4a) by deleting 
"lease." 

2. In each episcopal area in the Jurisdictional Conferences 
there shall be an Episcopal Residence Committee. It is rocom 
mondod that tho committoo bo , composed of the following 
persons: 

(Par. 735.2a),b), and c) would be unchanged from the ver- 
sions found in the Discipline and the Errata.) 

4. It shall be the responsibility of the Episcopal Residence 
Committee: 

a) To make recommendations to the Annual Conference(s) 
regarding the purchase, sale,-le»6er or rental of an episcopal 
residence. 

The above petition was adopted by vote of the General 
Council on Fiance and Administration on December 2, 1987. 



April 26, 1988 


DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 


25 


Additions to Advance Edition F 


THE PARTICIPATION OF W 


/OMEN ON GENERAL BOARDS AND AGENCIES OF THE UNIl 


FED METHODIST CHURCH 




Lay Women 



% Lay Women 



Clergy 



Clergy Women 



% Clergy Women 



Women Bishops 



% Women Bishops 



Total Members 



Total Women 



KEY: 
1968 I'i 
1974 ^ 

1977 m 
1981 a 

1987 ■ 



40 -\ 
30 

20 H 
10 



% women 



Membership on the general agencies for the 1985-88 
quadrennium is displayed both by category and per- 
centage. (Source: the 1985 United Methodist Directory). 

The bar graph below the table provides the comparison from 
each of the four preceding quadrennia. 

In the 1984 Book of Discipline, Par. 805.2 on the General 
Program Board Membership retains the composition of the 
basic membership on each program board to include one mem- 
ber from each annual and missionary conference; the provision 
to include one-third laymen, one-third laywomen, and one- 
third clergy and at least one clergywoman from each jurisdic- 
tion; and the same formula applied to dditional members. 
(Membership procedures or the Women's Division, Board of 
Global Ministries, are an exception as defined in Par. 1429.) 
New legislation in Par. 805.2 recommends that each general 
agency elect at least one member from among the member chur- 
ches of the Consultation on Church Union ther than the United 



Methodist Church. The General Commission on Christian 
Unity and Interreligious Concerns so identifies two COCU rep- 
resentatives in its membership. 

Overall, there is relatively minimal change from 1981 in the 
percentages of women on the general agencies. Among the fac- 
tors which seem to influence the fluctuations downward in the 
total percentages of women are the fewer numbers of cler- 
gywomen elected and the ssignment of additional bishops to 
some agencies. 

Listing in the Directory of additional bishops and members 
from the Central Conferences accounts for the increase in the 
total membership of the General Board of Global Ministries. 

Tabulation of members on the Commission on the General 
Conference does not include the Ex-ofTicio members, and there- 
fore, the percentage of women shows an increase from 26 per- 
cent in 1981 to 40 percent in 1985. 



26 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



Additions to Advance Edition F (cont.) 

General Commission On The Status And Role Of Women 
Membership 1985-1988 



• Bill Amos 

• Ressie Mae Bass 
Harrison Black 
Sung Lai Boo 
Kristan Burkert 

+ Minerva Carcano 
Judith Craig 

* Thomas Dahl 
Randy Day 
Marcus Dickson 
Barry Duggan 

* Dayton Edmonds 

* Edna Emery 
Ruth Everett 

+ Sharon Everhart 
Becky Haase 

♦ Joyce Hamlin 

+ Edwin Harrington 
Judith Hill 



H. Sharon Howell 

Laura Echols Hudson 

Tapuni (Cap) loelu 

Becky John 

Jim Kardos 

Charles Lamar 

Pamela Baker Lineberger 

Arturo Maine 

Virginia McGilbray 

Wilma Maier 

Don Mendenhall 

Margaret Misal 

Bill Mullette 

Sam NeSmith 

Jackie Pennington 

Sam Phillips 

MilcaPlaud 

Joe Pool 

Bert Pruess-Jones 



Those completing terms + Those who have resigned during Quadrennium 



Elizabeth Reed 
Barbara Riddle 
Joetta Rinehart 
Ruby Santibanez 
Rey Valencia Schuman 
Mary Kercherval Short 
Elizabeth Lopez Spence 
Ruth Steach 
Charles H. Stewart, HI 
Forrest Stith 
Linda Thomas 
Alfred Thompson 
Paul linger 
Ernest Valverde 
Georgiana Ward 
Jim Waterfield 
Ester Witherspoon 
Nancy Yamasaki 



Codes and Abbreviations 



Codes 

1-5 digits = numerical order 

+ 2 letters = legislative committee 

+ 4 digits + (000)1-2626 + disciplinaiy paragraph 

(0)00, (0)200, etc. = new disciplinary paragraph 

3000 + non-disciplinary matter 
+ 1 letter + C + constitutioned amendment 

= D = part of Discipline other than constitution 

= M = miscellaneous\ 

= R = resolution, report or recommendation 

= S = recommended study 
If $ added = fmancial implications 

Abbreviations 
Legislative Committees 



CC Commission on Central Conference Affairs 

CO Conferences 

CS Church and Society 

DI Discipleship 

FA Financial Administration 

FM Faith and Mission 

GA General Administration 

GM Global Ministries 

HE Higher Education and Chaplaincy 



IJ Independent Commissions/Judicial Administration 

LC Local Church 

MN Ordained and Diaconal Ministiy 

General Agencies 

GBCS General Board of Church and Society 

GBGM General Board of Global Ministries 

GBHM General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 

GBOD General Board of Discipleship 

GBPB General Board of Publication 

GBPN General Board of Pensions 

(JCAH General Commission on Archives and Histoiy 

GCCU General Commission on Christian Unity and Inter 

religous Concerns 
GCFA General Council on Finance and Administration 
GCOM General Council on Ministries 
(jCRR General Commission on Religion and Race 
GCSW General Commission on the Status and Role of 

Women 
NYMO United Methodist National Youth Ministry Or 

ganization 
UCOOM General Commission on Communication 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



27 



Abbreviations for the 
Annual Conferences of The United Methodist Church 



AFL 


Alabama-West Florida 


MEM 


- Memphis 


PRC 


Puerto Rico 


AKM 


Alaska Missionary 


MID 


Middle PhUippines 


RDM 


Red Bird Missionary 


AUS 


Austria Provisional 


MIN 


Mindanao 


RIO 


Rio Grande 


BLT 


Baltimore 


MNN 


Minnesota 


RKM 


Rocky Mountain 


BUL 


Bulgaria Provisional 


MSS 


Mississippi 


SLE 


Sierra Leone 


BUR 


Burundi 


MOE 


Missouri East 


SCA 


South Carolina 


CNV 


California-Nevada 


MOW 


Missouri West 


SDA 


South Dakota 


CAP 


California-Pacific 


MOZ 


Mozambique (Southeast Africa) 


SGA 


South Georgia 


CIL 


Central Illinois 


MUR 


Muri (Nigeria) Provisional 


SIN 


South Indiana 


CPA 


Central Pennsylvania 


NEB 


Nebraska 


SIL 


Southern Illinois 


CTX 


Central Texas 


NHA 


New Hampshire 


SNE 


Southern New England 


CZA 


Central Zaire 


NMX 


New Mexico 


SNJ 


Southern New Jersey 


CZE 


Czechoslovakia 


NYK 


New York 


SZA 


Southern Zaire 


DEN 


Denmark 


NAL 


North Alabama 


SWP 


Southwest PhUippines 


DSW 


Desert Southwest 


NAK 


North Arkansas 




Provisional 


DET 


Detroit 


NCA 


North Carolina 


STX 


Southwest Texas 


EOH 


East Ohio 


NNY 


North Central New York 


SWE 


Sweden 


EAN 


Eastern Angola 


NDK 


North Dakota 


SWF 


Switzeriand/France 


EPA 


Eastern Pennsylvania 


NGA 


North Georgia 


TEN 


Tennessee 


EST 


Estonia Provisional 


NIN 


North Indiana 


TEX 


Texas 


FIF 


Finland-Finnish Provisional 


NMS 


North Mississippi 


TRY 


Troy 


FIS 


Finland-Swedish Provisional 


NSH 


North Shaba 


VIR 


Virgina 


FLA 


Florida 


NTX 


North Texas 


WMI 


West Michigan 


DDR 


German Democratic Republic 


NEP 


Northeast Philippines 


WMP 


West Middle Philippines 


GNW 


German Northwest 


NZA 


Northeast Zaire 


WOH 


West Ohio 


GSO 


German South 


NIL 


Northern Illinois 


WVA 


West Virginia 


GSW 


German Southwest 


NJY 


Northern New Jersey 


WZA 


West Zaire 


HOL 


Holston 


NPH 


Northern Philippines 


WAN 


Western Angola 


HNG 


Hungary Provisional 


NWP 


Northwest Philippines 


WNY 


Western New York 


IWA 


Iowa 


NWT 


Northwest Texas 


WNC 


Western North Carolina 


KSE 


Kansas East 


NOR 


Norway 


WPA 


Western Pennsylvania 


KSW 


Kansas West 


OKL 


Oklahoma 


WIS 


Wisconsin 


KEN 


Kentucky 


OKI 


Oklahoma Indian Missionary 


WYO 


Wyoming 


LIB 


Liberia 


ORI 


Oregon-Idaho 


YEL 


Yellowstone 


LRK 


Little Rock 


PNW 


Pacric Northwest 


YUG 


Yugoslavia Provisional 


LSA 


Louisiana 


PEN 


Peninsula 


ZIM 


Zimbabwe 


LVL 


Louisville 


PHI 


Philippines 






MNE 


Maine 


POL 


Poland 







28 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



Petitions to the 1988 General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church 



The following is a list of the 2661 petitions 
that the Secretary of the General Conference 
has forwarded to the Committee on Reference 
for its review and referral to appropriate legis- 
lative committees. Abbreviations and petition 
code may be found on preceding pages. 



Commission of Central 
Conference Affairs 

537-CC-527-D Conference of Methodist 
Bishops. GCCU, GCFA. 

768-CC-527-D Conference of Methodist 
Bishops. GBHM. 

1078-CC-600-D Becoming a Covenanting 
Church. Council of Bishops, GCCU. 

2166-CC-637-D Composition of Central 
Conference. Opal C. Huettner, UMC, 
Markesan, Wisconsin. 

904-CC-638-D Property-holding Authority 
of Central Conferences. GCFA. 

1449-CC-638-D Itineration of bishops in 
Central Conferences. Clergy members in CNV, 
HOL, KEN, KSW, NIN, WOH, + 2 local groups 
and other individuals. 

161-CC-647-D$ Autonomous Methodist 
Churches. NIN. 

1076-CC-647-D Act of Covenanting Chur- 
ches. Council of Bishops, GCCU. 

1085-CC-647-D Definition of Autonomous 
Methodist Church and Entering into Covenan- 
tal Relationship. Council of Bishops, GCCU. 

1077-CC-648-D An Act of Covenanting. 
Council of Bishops, GCCU. 

642-CC-652-D Concordat Agreements. 
GCCU. 

160-CC-653-D Becoming Part of The 
United Methodist Church. NIN. 

565-CC-2301-D Executive Committee of 
Commission on Central Conference Affairs. 
GCCU + CC Executive Committee. 



Conferences 

1264-CO-lO-C Status of Annual Con- 
ference. LonnieD. Brooks, Christ UMC, Sugar 
Land, Texas. 

1602-CO-12-C Eligibility for election as 
delegate. Builders Sunday School Class, First 
UMC, Sullivan, Illinois. 

1828-CO-12-C General Conference. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Fredericksburg UMC, 
Fredericksburg, Texas. 

1972-CO-12-C Composition of General Con- 
ference. Bruce Hurley, First UMC, Harlingen, 
Texas. 

2202-CO-12-C Bishops' Voice at General 
Conference. Robert E. Dungy, NIN + 7 other 
individuals. 



2203-CO-12-C Amend Par. 12.3. VUtor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2086-CO-14-C Election of delegates. South 
CentralJurisdiction, Youth Ministry Organiza- 
tion. 

2087-CO-23-C Composition of Jurisdiction- 
al Conference. Bruce Hurley, First UMC, Har- 
lingen, Texas. 

2204-CO-26-C Amend Par. 25.4. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

1-CO-36-C Youth Members of Annual Con- 
ference. Central Conferences of Federal 
Republic of Germany, And West Berlin and Ger- 
man Democratic Republic. 

177-CO-35-C Youth/Young Adult Members 
of Annual Conference. NWP. 

653-CO-35-C Equalization of Lay and Cler- 
gy Members at Annual Conference. ORI. 

2088-CO-35-C Composition of Annual Con- 
ference. FIS. 

2089-CO-35-C Composition of Annual Con- 
ference. Jean Henderson, Broad Street UMC, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

2-CO-36-C Voting Rights of Lay Members of 
Annual Conference. CNV. 

1075-CO-36-C Status of Aimual Con- 
ference. LonnieD. Brooks, Christ UMC, Sugar 
Land, Texas. 

2090-CO-36-C Annual Conference. David 
Dolsen, First UMC, Pueblo, Colorado. 

950-CO-37-C Allowing Nominating Proces- 
ses. BAL delegation. 

571-CO-38-C Election of delegates. SIN. 

2091-CO-38-C Election of delegates. Opal 
C. Huettner, UMC, Markesan, Wisconsin. 

2205-CO-38-C Election of delegates. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2092-CO-39-C Election of Delegates. Opal 
C. Huettner, UMC, Markesan, Wisconsin. 

2206-CO-39-C Election of delegates. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

1663-CO-44-C Delete Par. 44. Leonard D. 
Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

1094-CO-45-C District Conferences. 7. Mel- 
ville Wohrley, EOH. 

82-CO-505-D$ Bishops in Jurisdictions. 
WYO. 

83-CO-505-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. 
NDK. 

84-CO-505-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. 
NAL, NGA, SGA + Southeastern Jurisdiction- 
al, AFL, FLA Committees on Episcopacy. 

85-CO-505-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. 
NIN, SIN. 

1476-CO-505-D Determining number of 
bishops to be elected. William R. Johnson, 
NDK. 



1622-CO-506-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. 
John Lloyd Knox, Bishop. 

1S35-CO-506-D$ Bishops to be assigned to 
one conference only. William A. Highfield, 
WYO. 

1982-CO-505-D Election of bishops in juris- 
dictions. Ridgway F. Shinn Jr., Mathewson 
Street UMC, Providence, Rhode Island. 

178-CO-606-D Election Process. Merlin J. 
Ackerson, IWA. 

635-CO-506-D Consecration of Bishops. 
GCCU. 

1365-CO-506-D Election of Bishops. 
Richard B. Fans, VIR. 

1477-CO-606-D Nominations for episcopal 
election. William R. Johnson, NDK. 

1983-CO-506-D Election of bishops. 
Donald A. Smith, First UMC, Marion, Indiana. 

86-CO-507-D Assignment Process. WYO. 

272-CO-507-D Tenure of Bishops. CIL. 

1478-CO-507-D Assignment of bishops. 
William R. Johnson, NDK. 

1576-CO-507-D Effective date for assign- 
ment of bishops. Ralph L. Minker, BAL. 

1730-CO-507-D Assignment of bishops. 
Michigan Area Episcopacy Committee. 

1860-CO-507-D Assignment of bishops. 
WVA cabinet. 

2035-CO-507-D Bishops in jurisdictions. 
United Methodist Appalachian Development 
Committee, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

2152-CO-507-D Bishops in jurisdictions. 
PaulF. Perry, SWT. 

539-CO-600-D Commission on the General 
Conference. GCCU. 

773-CO-600-D Responsibilities of Secretary 
of the General Conference. GCAH. 

775-CO-600-D Responsibilities of Secretary 
of the General Conference. GCAH. 

1133-CO-600-D Commission on the 
General Conference. GCFA. 

1479-CO-600-D Commission on the 
General Conference. Commission on the 
General Conference. 

1864-CO-600-D Petitions Secretary. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

91-CO-602-D Ministerial Members. SIN. 

383-CO-602-D Annual Conference 
Resource Persons. SCA. 

505-CO-602-D Election of Delegates. 
Steven K Brown, EOH. 

638-CO-602-D Election of delegates to 
General Conference. GCC17. 

1132-CO-602-D General Conference Mem- 
bership. GCFA 

1359-CO-602-D Procedure for electing 
General Conference delegates. Anna M. Winn, 
Greenwood UMC, Yale, Michigan. 

1769-CO-602-D Reduce maximum size of 
General Conference. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



29 



1770-CO-602-D Election of delegates. Mary 
EllaM. and Sam R. Mitchell Jr., Trinity UMC, 
Sumter, South Carolina. 

1865-CO-602-D Composition of General 
Conference. Administrative Board, Frederick- 
sburg UMC, Fredericksburg, Texas. 

1866-CO-602-D Composition of General 
Conference. Harold E. Walton, PEN. 

1994-CO-602-D Election of delegates to 
General Conference. Donald A. Smith, First 
UMC, Marion, Indiana. 

2160-CO-602-D Lay delegates. Barbara 
and Erroll Wendland, First UMC, Temple, 
Texas. 

1580-CO-604-D Election of Secretary-desig- 
nate. Charles L. Myers and Lloyd M. Wright, 

sm. 

1995-CO-604-D Election of Secretaiy-desig- 
nate. Howard Hahn, WOH. 

2161-CO-604-D Election of Secretary-desig- 
nate. MarcusBlaising,NINandJ. Wesley Her- 
tel, SIN. 

179-CO-606-D Secretaiy of the General 
Conference. Commission on the General Con- 
ference. 

540-CO-60S-D Invitations to Eciunenical 
Representatives to General Coiiference. 
GCCU. 

1996-CO-60S-D Responsibilities of 
Secretary of the General Conference. Joseph 
R. Graham, WOH. 

2242-CO-605-D Responsibilities of 
Secretary of the General Conference. Earl B. 
Carter, NAK + Northeastern and Western 
Secretaries of Jurisdictional Conferences. 

541-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con- 
ference. GCCU. 

771-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con- 
ference. GCAH. 

925-CO-608-D Approval of Petitions. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Faith UMC, Woodward, 
Oklahoma. 

1134-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con 
ference. GCFA 

1552-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con 
ference. Committee on Correlation and 
Editorial Revision. 

1581-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con- 
ference. J. Robert Martin, WNC, + 4 local 
churches and 1 individual 

1771-CO-608-D Retain right of individual to 
petition General Conference. Leonard D. 
Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

1867-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con- 
ference. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2243-CO-608-D Petitions to General Con- 
ference. Millie Hilts, California Heights UMC, 
Long Beach, California. 

772-CO-610-D Book of Resolutions. GCAH. 

774-CO-610-D Responsibilities of Secretary 
of the General Conference. GCAH. 

2162-CO-610-D Book of Resolutions. Bar- 
bara and Erroll Wendland, First UMC, Temple, 
Texas. 

1413-CO-611-D Polling local churches. 
Members, Clymer and Edwards Chapel UMCs, 
Clymer, New York, -f 1 individual, Corry, PA. 



1553-CO-611-D Move and amend Par. 611. 

Committee on Correlation and Editorial 
Revision. 

1997-CO-611-D General Committee on the 
Episcopacy. Ridgway F. Shinn Jr., Mathe- 
wson Street UMC, Providence, Rhode Island. 

92-CO-613-D Ministerial Members. SIN. 

2I63-CO-613-D Lay delegates. Barbara 
and Erroll Wendland, First UMC, Temple, 
Texas. 

2164-CO-613-D Youth delegates. Youth 
Ministry Organization, South Central Jurisdic- 
tion. 

1998-CO-614-D Election of delegates. 
Donald A Smith, First UMC, Marion, Indiana. 

93-CO-622-D Jurisdictional Committee on 
Episcopacy. NDK. 

94-CO-622-D$ Change Episcopal Area to 
Annual Conference. WYO. 

1334-CO-622-D Jurisdictional Committee 
on Episcopacy. CAP Racism Convocation 
Team. 

1999-CO-622-D Vacancies on the Jurisdic- 
tionei] Committee on Episcopacy. Wesley R. 
Crompton, WYO. 

903-CO-626-D Jurisdictional Conference 
Journals. GCFA, GCOM. 

1639-CO-626-D Jurisdictional Conference 
JoiUTial. Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order. 

2000-CO-626-D Secretaries of Jurisdiction- 
al Conferences. Joseph R. Graham, WOH. 

2244-CO-626-D Secretary of the Jurisdic- 
tional Conference. EarlB. Carter, NAK + ATor- 
theastem and Western, Secretaries of 
Jurisdictional Conferences. 

776-CO-627-D Jurisdictional Conference. 
GBOD. 

2165-C0.632-D Jurisdictional Youth Mini- 
stry Organization. Youth Ministry Organiza- 
tion, South Central Jurisdiction. 

779-CO-659-D Clergy Couples' Minimum 
Salary Claim. GCFA, GCSW + National As- 
sociation of Commissions, on Equitable 



679-CO-662-D Mission. GBGM. 

2245-CO-662-D Missions. Victor 

Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

580-CO-663-D Establishment and Ad- 
ministration of a Mission. GBGM. 

1868-CO-700-D Conference Nominating 
Committee. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1869-CO-700-D Committee on Ministry to 
Persons with Handicapping Conditions. NCA 
Committee, Ministry to Persons with Handicap- 
ping Conditions. 

2001-CO-700-D Comnuttee on Planning 
and Research. WIS Committee on Planning 
and Research. 

2002-CO-700-D Committee on the Church 
and Ministries with Persons with Handicap- 
ping Conditions. RKM Committee, Ministries 
with Persons with Handicapping Conditions. 

95-CO-701-D Ministerial Members. WYO. 

96-CO-701-D Ministerial Members. SNE. 

97-CO-701-D Voting Rights of Local Pas- 
tors. NAL. 



98-CO-701-D Composition of Annual Con- 
ference. RKM. 

99-CO-701-D Voting Rights of Lay Mem- 
bers of Annual Conference. WIS. 

180-CO-701-D Membership of Annual Con- 
ference. Mark S. Womack, Clifton Hills UMC, 
Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

181-CO-701-D Voting righu of Diaconal 
Ministers. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

643-CO-701-D Persons seated at Annual 
Conference without vote. GCCU. 

960-CO-701-D Election of Lay Delegates. 
CC Executive Committee. 

1079-CO-701-D Ministerial Membership of 
an Annual Conference. Members, Davis 
Memorial UMC, Harrison, New Jersey. 

1093-CO-701-D Rights of Student Local 
Pastors and Part-Time Local Pastors. 1986 
Local Pastor's License School, Orleans, VT. 

1343-CO-701-D Amend Par. 701. Board of 
Managers, 1987 Course of Study School, 
Perkins School of Theology. 

1426-CO-701-D Annual Conference mem- 
bership. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Donna, Texas. 

1731-CO-701-D Voting rights of associate 
members. Administrative Council, First UMC, 
Cardington, Ohio. 

1732-CO-701-D Voting rights of local and 
student pastors. Administrative Council, First 
UMC, Cardington, Ohio. 

2004-CO-701-D Ministerial Membership of 
an Annual Conference. William E. Ballard, 
IWA + NC and NE Jurisdictional, Town and 
Country Association and National UM Rural 
Fellowship. 

2167-CO-701-D Voting rights. Opal C. 
Huettner, UMC, Markesan, Wisconsin. 

2168-CO-701-D Voting rights. Administra- 
tive Board, First UMC, Yorktown, Texas. 

2169-CO-701-D Voting rights of Associate 
Members. W. E. Ballard, IWA -f Town and 
Country groups, NC, NJ, SE Jurisdictions and 
National Rural Fellowship. 

2170-CO-701-D Voting rights of Local and 
Student Pastors. W. E.Ballard, IWA + NC,NE 
Town and Country Asso., Ex. Com. and Nation- 
al UM Rural Fellowship. 

2246-CO-701-D Voting rights. Robert E. 
Dungy, NIN + 4 other individuals. 

2248-CO-701-D Composition of Annual 
Conference. National Association, Annual 
Conference Lay Leaders. 

100-CO-702-D Conference Lay Leader. 
MEM. 

780-CO-702-D Conference lay leader. 
GBOD. 

781-CO-702-D Associate conference lay 
leaders. GBOD. 

1450-CO-702-D Conference Lay Leader. 
Lonnie D. Brooks, Christ UMC, Sugar Land, 
Texas. 

2249-CO-702-D Organization of Annual 
Conference. National Association, Annual 
Conference Lay Leaders. 

782-CO-702-D Associate conference lay 
leaders. MEM. 



30 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



905-CO-703-D Annual Conference Finan- 
cial Obligations. GCFA. 

2005-CO-703-D Powers and Duties of An- 
nual Conference. Bruce Birth, BAL. 

2006-CO-703-D Powers and Duties of An- 
nual Conference. Walter J. Zabel, BAL. 

783-CO-704-D Executive Session. GBHM. 

1772-CO-704-D Eliminate Annual Con- 
ference Executive Session. Leonard D. SluU, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1870-CO-704-D Defmition of Executive 
Session. Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, 
Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

1871-CO-704-D Pre-conference disclosure 
of items of business. Annual Church Meeting, 
Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs Ferry, New York. 

2007-CO-704-D Reports from general agen- 
cies. SueAvey, Christ UMC, Kettering, Ohio. 

262-CO-705-D Annual Conference Jour- 
nals. CAP. 

784-CO-705-D Records and Archives. 
GBHM. 

906-CO-705-D Annual Conference Mini- 
sterial Personnel Records. GCFA. 

907-CO-705-D Annual Conference Mini- 
sterial Personnel Records. GCFA. 

101-CO-706-D Conference Committee on 
Nominations. KSE. 

182-CO-706-D Membership of Conference 
Agencies. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

400-CO-706-D Inclusiveness. GCRR. 

441-CO-706-D Nominating Committee. 
GCRR. 

1480-CO-706-D Annual Conference struc- 
ture. William R. Johnson, SDK. 

2008-CO-706-D Conference Nominating 
Committee. William R. Keeffe, NHA. 

2014-CO-706-D Conference Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Blair, Nebraska. 

2171-CO-706-D Annual Conference struc- 
ture. Creed S. Davis Jr, VIR. 

2172-CO-706-D Membership of conference 
agencies. Paul F. Perry, SWT. 

2247-CO-706-D Members of general agen- 
cies. Millie Hilts, California Heights UMC, 
Long Beach, California. 

2013-CO-725-D Reporting total compensa- 
tion. Walter J. Zabel, BAL. 

114-CO-726-D Conference Ethnic Minority 
Local Church Concerns Committee. BAL, CIL, 
DET, EOH, KEN, NAL, NTX, NWT, SGA, SIN, 
+ North Central Jurisdiction Urban Network. 

115-CO-726-D Conference Ethnic Minority 
Local Church Concerns Committee. BAL, CIL, 
DET, EOH, NAL, NTX, NWT, SGA, SIN, -f 
North Central Jurisdiction Urban Network. 

116-CO-726-D Conference Ethnic Minority 
Concerns Committee. NGA. 

183-CO-726-D ResponsibiUties of Con- 
ference Council on Ministries. Jim Beat, NAK 

786-C0.726-D Conference Scouting Coor- 
dinator. GBOD ■¥ Administrative Council, 
Grace UMC, Memphis, Tennessee + 1 in- 
dividual. 

1037-CO-726-D Annual Conference Coim- 
cil on Ministries. MUMC. 



1111-CO-726-D Conference Council 
Director's Relationship to Cabinet. GCOM. 

1776-CO-726-D Optional Conference Coun- 
cil on Ministries. Barrett Renfro, SWT. 

2015-CO-726-D Election of officers of Con- 
ference Council on Ministries. George W. 
Hayes, NAL. 

2016-CO-726-D Election of officers of Con- 
ference Council on Ministries. D. Max Whit- 
field. NAK. 

2017-CO-726-D Conference Council 
Director's Relationship to Cabinet 
Southeastern Jurisdiction Association, Con- 
ference Council Directors. 

2018-CO-726-D Committee on Ethnic 
Minority Local Church Concerns. William E. 
Ballard, IWA, ■^ National United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship. 

2175-CO-726-D Committee on Ethnic 
Minority Local Church Concerns. Ethnic 
Minority Local Church Committee, WML 

2251-CO-726-D Program evaluation. 
Robert J. Dexter, NIN + 2 other individuals. 

2025-CO-745-D District Conference. Bruce 
Birch, BAL. 

583-CO-747-D District Secretary of Global 
Ministries. GBGM. 

800-CO-747-D District Scouting Coor- 
dinator. GBOD + Administrative Council, 
Grace UMC, Memphis, Tennessee + 1 in- 
dividual. 

1537-CO-747-D District Council on Mini- 
stries. 7. Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

2026-CO-747-D District Administrative 
Council. William E. Ballard, IWA ■^ Nat. UM 
Rural Fellowship, NE, SE Juris. Town and 
Country groups. 

2181-CO-747-D District Council on Mini- 
stries. Paul F. Perry, SWT. 

185-CO-3000-M Enforcing Church Policy. 
Administrative Council, Pleasant Chapel UMC, 
Van Wert, Ohio. 

186-CO-3000-M Upholding Book of Dis- 
cipline. Administrative Council, St Paul 
UMC, College, Alaska. 

187-CO-3000-M Speaking for the Church. 
Administrative Council, St Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska. 

184-CO-3000-R Annual Conference Jour- 
nals. DET. 

188-CO-3000-R General Conference Policy. 
Administrative Council, St Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska. 

226-CO-3000-R Endorse "In Defense of 
Creation". CNV. 

277-CO-3000-R Preparations for 1992 
General Conference. DSW. 

280-CO-3000-R Permanent Numbering 
System for Book of DiscipUne. AKM. 

310-CO-3000-R Contente of Book of Dis- 
cipline. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

619-CO-3000-R Preparations for General 
Conference. RIO. 

1193-CO-3000-R Authority of General Con- 
ference Administrative Committee on Correla- 
tion and Editorial Revision. GCFA. 



1280-CO-3000-R Assigning of Paragraph 
Numbers in the Book of Discipline. William P. 
Sanders, DET. 

1391-CO-3000-R Record individual voting 
Ad. Board, Grace UMC, Indiana + Ad. Coun- 
cils, Trinity UMC, Mt Pleasant and Albright 
UMC, So. Connellsville and COM, Hilltop 
UMC, Madison, Pennsylvania. 

1524-CO-3000-R Emphasize Bible land 
values. Administrative Council, St Paul UMC, 
College, Alaska. 

1696-CO-3000-R Moratorium on efforts to 
alter Disciplinary statements concerning 
homosexusdity. Administrative Councils, 
Memphis UMC, Memphis, Tennessee, and 
Pleasant Grove UMC, Charlestown, Indiana. 

1893-CO-3000-R Hearing with past and 
present Secretaries of the General Conference. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2200-CO-3000-R Annual Conference Boun- 
daries. GBGM. 

2277-CO-3000-R Episcopal nominees 
fmeuicial reports. James A. Trickett, LSA. 

2278-CO-3000-R Frequency of annual conf- 
erence. J. Cecil Williamson, NMS. 

2279-CO-3000-R Adult Day Care. Marion 
M. Kilpatnck, Ardmore UMC, West Chester, 
andKathrynH. Williams, UMC, Berwyn,Pen- 
nsylvania. 

2287-CO-3000-R Members of general agen- 
cies on General Conference Legislative Com- 
mittees. Don M. Pike, CTX. 

2288-CO-3000-R Salaried staff on General 
Conference Legislative Committees. Don M. 
Pike, CTX. 

2289-CO-3000-R Petitions to General Con- 
ference. Philip M. Niblack, MOE. 

2290-CO-3000-R Petitions to General Con- 
ference. D. C. and Sue E. Moffitt, Ashford 
UMC, Houston, Texas. 

2291-CO-3000-R Planning for the 1992 
General Conference. Native American Interna- 
tional Caucus. 

2292-CO-3000-R Celebrating the 100th an- 
niversary of the Deaconess Movement in the 
UM tradition. Barbara Campbell, Betty Ruth 
Goode, Lucy R. Gist, SL Paul & St Andrew 
UMC. New York. New York, -f 9 other in- 
dividuals. 

2420-CO-3000-R Instruct Committee on 
Correlation and Editoricd Revision to delete 
outdated material in Discipline. Victor 
Goldschmidt. St Andrew UMC. West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2424-CO-3000-R Editorial changes in the 
Discipline. Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew 
UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

2468-CO-3000-R Language in the Dis- 
cipline. Howard L. Lydick, First UMC, 
Richardson, Texas. 

2666-CO-3000-R One member-one vote. 
Arthur R. Kirk, EOH. 

2566-CO-3000-R Voting on issues. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Pleasant City UMC, 
Pleasant City, Ohio. 

2633-CO-3000-R Clergy spouses. Dee Anne 
Henke, UMC, Trenton, Missouri. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



31 



Church and Society 

1474-CS-OO-D Just Peace Theology. MOE 
Peace with Justice Task Force. 

168-CS-70-D Preamble to Social Principles. 
NIN. 

663-CS-70-D Preamble to the Social Prin- 
ciples. GCSW. 

1609-CS-70-D Retain Preamble to Social 
Principles. Administrative Board, St. John 
UMC, Mobile, Alabama. 

2097-CS-70-D Preamble to the Social Prin- 
ciples. Barbara and Erroll Wendland, First 
UMC, Temple, Texas. 

2211-CS-70-D Preamble to the Social Prin- 
ciples. Administrative Council, Rodney UMC, 
Rodney, Ohio. 

4-CS-71-D The Family. NWT. 

5-CS-71-D Human SexuaUty. 13 annual 
conferences, WNCBOM, TEX BCS and del., 456 
local groups and 105 individuals. 

6-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. GCSW, 
NYMO, CNV, KSE, ORI, PNW, WIS, + 2 local 
churches and 2 individuals. 

7-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. KSE. 

8-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. DET. 

9-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. CNV. 

10-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. RKM. 

11-CS-71-D Abortion. WVA 

12-CS-71-D Abortion. KEN. 

13-CS-71.D Abortion. NDK 

14-CS-71-D Abortion. CPA 

15-CS-71-D Abortion. WMI. 

189-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Richard C. 
Dunham, Amboy UMC, Connaaut, Ohio. 

190-CS-71-D Retain Par. 71 G). Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Lisbon, North 
Dakota. 

191-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Councils, Leland and Suydam UMCs, Leland, 
Illinois. 

192-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, Grace UMC, Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

501-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. GBCS + 
members. Trinity UMC, Atlanta, Georgia. 

920-CS-71-D Retain Par. 71 C). Ad- 
ministrative Council, UMC, Tyrone, Ok- 
lahoma, Administrative Board, UMC, Goshen, 
Ohio, and members, Midland-Green Valley 
Charge, Midland, Pennsylvania. 

1274-CS-71-D Abortion. WNY. 

1295-CS-71.D Human Sexuality. Reconcil- 
ing Congregation Task Force, Wesley UMC, 
Fresno, California. 

1296-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. RobertM. 
Armstrong, Belle Isle UMC, Warners, New 
York. 

1297.CS.71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Boards, Administrative Councils, members, 10 
local churches, in Louisiana and Texas. 

1360-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, Levy UMC, North Little Rock, Arkansas. 

1363-CS-71-D Abortion. Charles D. Story, 
SWT. 

1384-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Waynedcde UMC, Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. 



1419-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. United 
Methodist Women, UMC, Alva, + members, 
Oak Grove UMC, Tampa, Florida. 

1424-CS-71-D Retain Par. 71 G). Ad- 
ministrative Councils or Boards, Members, 8 
local churches, in Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, 
Louisiana, Ohio. 

1471-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Williams Center Asbury 
UMC, Bryan, Ohio. 

1520-CS-71-D Abortion. Richard S. 
Ghyselinck, Chapel Heights UMC, Eau Claire, 
Wisconsin. 

1533-CS-71-DRetainPar.71A),C),F). Ad- 
ministrative Board, Wesley UMC, Longview, 
Texas, and Adult Fellowship Class, First UMC, 
Sherman, Texas. 

1548-CS-71-D Abortion. Maxine Hender- 
son, TEN. 

1569-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Pastor- 
Parish Relations Committee, Stehman 
Memorial UMC, Millersville, Pennsylvania. 

1610-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, Waterville UMC, Waterville, Ohio. 

1611-CS-71-D Abortion. CTX Brownwood 
District Council on Ministries. 

1612-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, Wolf 
Lake UMC, Wolf Lake, Indiana. 

1613-CS-71-D Retain Par. 71 C) and F). G. 
William Wilcher, WOH 

1625-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, Williams Center Asbury UMC, Bryan, 
Ohio. 

1644-CS-71-D Abortion. Charge Con- 
ference, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, 
Maryland. 

1689-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, Wesley UMC, Borger, Texas. 

1726-CS-71-D Abortion. Delores F. Young, 
Waterville UMC, Waterville, Ohio. 

1832-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Members, 
Wesley UMC, Shiloh, and UMC, Camden, 
North Carolina, + 2 individuals. 

1833-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. IWA 
Board of Ordained Ministry. 

1834-CS-71.D Human SexuaUty. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Trinity UMC, Pick- 
erington, Ohio. 

1835-CS-71.D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, Saint Mark's UMC, Victoria, Texas. 

1836-CS-71-D Marriage. Administrative 
Board, St. Paul UMC, Jacksonville, Florida. 

1837-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, Trinity UMC, Pickerington, Ohio. 

1838-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, Trinity UMC, Windsor, Connecticut. 

1839-CS-71-D Abortion. Annual Church 
Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs Ferry, New 
York. 

1909-CS-71-D Abortion. Mr and Mrs. Jerry 
M. Sams, UMC, Maineville, Ohio. 

1910-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, Hope 
UMC, Whitehouse, Ohio. 

1912-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, St. Paul 
UMC, Midland, Texas. 

1913-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, First 
UMC, Melbourne, Florida. 



1914-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, Mid- 
land-Green Valley Charge, Midland, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

1915-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, UMC, Salem Center, Ohio. 

1916-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, UMC, Rutland, Ohio. 

1918-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Members, 
Fulton Heights UMC, Mobile, Alabama 

1919-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Members, 
Christian Endeavor UMC, Newark, Ohio. 

1920-CS-71-D Death with Dignity. Ad- 
ministrative Council, UMC, Rutland, Ohio. 

2098-CS-71-D Marriage. Brian E. Carter, 
IWA. 

2099-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Brian E. 
Carter, IWA. 

2100-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Herman 
Y. Carr, UMC, New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

2101-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. John M. 
Akers, St. Paul's UMC, Denver, Colorado. 

2102-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Council, Disciples UMC, Holley, New York. 

2103-CS-71-D Abortion. Dr. and Mrs. Paul 
E. Brown Jr., Munsey UMC, Johnson City, Ten- 
nessee. 

2104-CS-71-D Abortion. PhilipM. Niblack, 
MOE. 

2105-CS-71-D Abortion. Joyce E. Dings, 
Guy A Freesen, Gary L. Motta,CIL. 

2106-CS-71-D Abortion. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Refugio, Texas. 

2212-CS-71-D Nurturing Community 
Robert E. Dungy, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, 
St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana, 

2213-CS-71-D Christian Communities. 
Robert E. Dungy, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, 
St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

2214-CS-71-D Adoption. Marcus Blaising, 
NIN + 7 other individuals. 

2426-CS-71-D The Family Rex Strickland 
Class, Asbury UMC, El Paso, Texas. 

2648-CS-71-D Death with Dignity. Ad- 
ministrative Council, UMC, Salem Center, 
Ohio. 

1917-CS-71-D Abortion. Members, UMC, 
Lockbridge, West Virginia. 

16-CS-72-D Rights of Religious Minorities. 
KEN. 

17-CS-72-D Rights of Unborn Children. 
KEN. 

18-CS-72.D Rights of Children. KEN. 

19-CS-72-D Genetic Technology. Central 
Conference in the Federal Republic, Germany 
and West Berlin. 

20-CS-72-D Artificial Insemination. 
Central Conference in the Federal Republic of 
Germany and West Berlin. 

21-CS-72-D Media Violence and Pornog- 
raphy. KEN. 

385-CS-72-D Rights of Racial and Ethnic 
Minorities. GCRR. 

664-CS-72-D Righte of Racial and Ethnic 
Minorities. GCSW. 

665-CS-72-D Affirmative Action. GCSW. 

1100-CS-72-D Commercial Television and 
Radio Obscenities. Administrative Board, 
Moody Memorial UMC, Galveston, Texas. 



32 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1614-CS-72-D Rights of Persons with 
Handicapping Conditions. Betty Lou Peters, 
Faith UMC, Fargo, North Dakota. 

1758-CS-72-D Rights of the Unborn. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Alger Memorial UMC, 
Eaton, Colorado. 

1921-CS-72-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. 
Members, Halsey and Shedd UMCs, Halsey, 
Oregon. 

1922-CS-72-D Retain Par. 72. Administra- 
tive Board, Antioch UMC, Roaring Gap, North 
Carolina 

2107-CS-72-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. 
Howard L. Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, 
Texas. 

2108-CS-72-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. 
MaxE. Goldman, IWA. 

2109-CS-72-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. 
Barbara and Erroll Wendland, First UMC, 
Temple, Texas. 

2110-CS-72-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. 
Scott Dunbar, First UMC, Decatur, Georgia. 

2111-CS-72-D Suicidal Persons. Barry S. 
McDonald, First UMC, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. 

2215-CS-72-D Population Growth. Robert 
E. Dingy, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, St. 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

2216-CS-72-D Alcohol and Tobacco Use. 
Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

2282-CS-72-D Rights of Racial and Ethnic 
Minorities. Members, Wesley UMC, Amherst, 
Massachusetts. 

2112-CS-73-D Gambling. Scott Dunbar, 
First UMC, Decatur, Georgia. 

22-CS-74-D Criminal Justice. KEN. 

23-CS-74-D Crime and Rehabilitation. 
CPA 

193-CS-74-D Crime and Rehabilitation. 
Alvin W. Warren, Suydam UMC, Leland, Il- 
linois. 

194-CS-74-D Civil Obedience and Dis- 
obedience. Paul B. Mitchell, KSE. 

666-CS-74-D Responsibilities as Citizens. 
GBHM. 

2113-CS-74-D Basic Freedoms. Samuel T. 
Calvin, UMC, Kenova, West Virginia. 

1840-CS-75-D The World Community. An- 
nual Church Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs 
Ferry, New York. 

2217-CS-75-D National Power and Respon- 
sibility. Robert E. Dingy, NIN + Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

24-CS-76-D Social Creed. EPA, MCE, NIL, 
NIN, NYK, SIN, YEL. 

25-CS-76-D Social Creed. CNV. 

26-CS-76-D Social Creed. RKM. 

27-CS-76-D Social Creed. TRY. 

28-CS-76-D Social Creed. SGA 

195-CS-76-D Social Creed. William C. 
Mason, OKL + 21 local churches. 

602-CS-76-D Social Creed. GBCS. 

523-CS-76-D Social Creed. Members, 
Aldersgate UMC, Rochester, New York. 

921-CS-76-D Social Creed. Louis B. Shinn, 
Red Bluff UMC, Red Bluff, California. 



1098-CS-76-D Social Creed. /. MelvilU 
Wohrley, EOH. 

1275-CS-76-D Social Creed. WNY. 

1462-CS-76-D Retain present Social Creed. 
Administrative Council, Gardnertown UMC, 
Newburgh, New York. 

1615-CS-76-D Social Creed. Builders Sun- 
day School Class, First UMC, Sullivan, Il- 
linois. 

1841-CS-76-D Social Creed. Constance 
Roland MeUger, PEN. 

1923-CS-76-D Social Creed. Members, 
Laurelville Charge, Laurelville, Ohio. 

1924-CS-76-D Social Creed. Paul H. and 
Winifred Kuper, Asbury UMC, Greenville, Ten- 
nessee. 

1925-CS-76-D Social Creed. Administrative 
Council, Arlington UMC, Arlington, Georgia 

1926-CS-76-D Social Creed for new hymnal. 
E. Sturzenacker, SIL, W. Pierce, WMI, J. Fish, 
WPA, + 44 local churches and 14 individuals. 

2114-CS-76-D Social Creed. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 

2 1 15-CS-76-D Social Creed. Administrative 
Board, Killeam UMC, Tallahassee, Florida 

1428-CS-71-D Human Sexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Dobbins Memorial UMC, 
Delanco, New Jersey. 

787-CS-728-D Conference Board of Church 
and Society. GCSW. 

1777-CS-728-D Optional Conference Board 
of Church and Society. Barrett Renfro, SWT. 

196-CS-llOl-D Church IN Society. G. 
Dean Miller, First UMC, Stillwater, Minnesota 

886-CS.llOl-D General Board of Church 
and Society. NMX. 

412-CS-1104-D Relationship with General 
Commission on Religion and Race. GCRR. 

1042-CS-1104-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

2263-CS-1104-D General Board of Church 
and Society speaking to the world. Robert E. 
Dungy, NIN + Victor Goldschmidtt, St. Andrew 
UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana 

614-CS-1106-D Board's Organization. 
GBCS. 

1792-CS-1109-D Optional Executive Com- 
nuttee. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

515-CS-1114-D General Agency Staff. 
GBCS. 

197-CS-3000-M Celebrate Social Creed An- 
niversaiy. MOE, SIN, TRY, WNY. 

212-CS-3000-M Alcoholism Rehabilitation. 
IWA. 

213-CS-3000-M List Alcohol Content. IWA. 

214-CS-3000-M Health Hazard Warning. 
IWA 

228-CS-3000-M World Peace through 
World Law. RKM. 

229-CS-3000-M U. S. World Peace Tax. 
WMI 

240-CS-30O0-M Sanctuaiy. NYK 

243-CS-3000-M Persons Missing in Action. 
SNJ. 

244-CS-3000-M Modify U.S. Flag Laws and 
Regulations. Richard C. Hopkins, MNE. 

245-CS-3000-M Sale of Handguns. EOH. 



1127-CS-3000-M Ratification of Human 
Rights Covenants and Conventions. GBCS. 

1261-CS-3000-M USA/USSR Verifiable 
Arms Limitation Treaty. Administrative Coun- 
cil, First UMC, Ticonderoga, New York. 

1513-CS-3000-M AfTuTn English as official 
language of USA. Charles D. Story, SWT + Ad- 
ministrative Council, UMC, Pemberton, New 
Jersey and 2 individuals. 

1901-CS-3000-M Labeling of intoxicants. 
Church and Society Work Area, Broadmoor 
UMC, Shreveport, Louisiana 

2303-CS-3000-M Human Sexuality. Rex 
Strickland Class, Asbury UMC, El Paso, Texas. 

2320-CS-3000-M Protecting the Native 
American land base. Native American Interna- 
tional Caucus. 

198-CS-3000-R Rights of ChUdren. ML, 
SIL. 

199-CS-3000-R Day Care. NIL, SIL. 

200-CS-3000-R ChUd Care Policy. NIL. 

201-CS-3000-R Post Adoptive Services. 
SWT. 

202-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
SGA. 

203-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
NCA 

204-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
NDK, 131 local groups, and 29 individuals. 

205-CS-3000-R Human Needs Are More 
Important than Military Alternatives. NIN. 

206-CS-3000-R Reverence for Life. J. 
Thomas Fitch, Alamo Heights UMC, San An- 
tonio, Texas. 

207-CS-3OOO-R Withdraw from Groups 
Supporting Abortion. Administrative Board, 
Kent Island UMC, Chester, Maryland. 

208-CS-3000-R Chastity. SWT. 

209-CS-3000-R Condemn Legal Prostitu- 
tion. CNV. 

210-CS-3000-R Alcohol Abstention Week. 
Edgar W. Parsons, First UMC, Sacramento, 
California 

211-CS-3000-R Personal Abstinence. IWA 

216-CS-3000-R Action on AIDS. CNV, 
RKM. 

217-CS-3000-R Action on Aids. SGA. 

218-CS-3000-RAIDS. WYO. 

219-CS-3000-R$ AIDS and the Church. 
NYK 

220-CS-3000-R Policy toward Persons 
Living with AIDS. PNW. 

221-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
EPA, HOL, NDK, SIL, + 119 local groups and 
34 individuals. 

222-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
EOH. 

223-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Cardington, 
OH, and members, UMC, Murfreesboro, Ten- 
nessee. 

224-CS-3000-R Pornography and 

Obscenity. KEN. 

225-CS-3000-R Adopt "In Defense of Crea- 
tion". W. Cecil Findley, KSW. 

227-CS-3000-R Water Resources. CNV. 

230-CS-30O0-R Middle East. Andrew C. 
Noxon, NIL. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



33 



231-CS-30OO-R Central America. CNV. 

232-CS-3000-R Central America. NYK. 

233-CS-3000-R Nicaragua. WVA. 

234-CS-3000-R South Africa. SGA. 

235-CS-30O0-R South Africa. WYO. 

236-CS-3000-R Southern Africa. WPA. 

237.CS-3000-R Southern Africa. NYK 

239-CS-3000-R Native Americans. OKI 
School of Christian Mission. 

24 1-CS-3000-R Support of Freedom. AKM. 

242-CS-3000-R Conscientious Objection. 
Church School Class, Asbury UMC, El Paso, 
Texas. 

246-CS-3000-R Remove 1976 Resolution on 
Gun Control. Administrative Council, St. Paul 
UMC, College, Alaska. 

247-CS-30O0-R Support of Table Grapes 
Boycott NIL. 

248-CS-30O0-R Addition to 1984 Resolu- 
tion: Family Farms. CNV. 

249-CS-3000-R Rights of Labor. NIL. 

250-CS-30O0-R Handling and Treatment of 
Hazardous Wastes. RKM. 

276-CS-3000-R Health of Clergy Persons 
and Families. NAK. 

494-CS-3000-R Project Equality. GCRR. 

495-CS-3000-R Racial Inclusiveness. 
GCRR. 

496-CS-3000-R School Busing. GCRR. 

497-CS-3000-RAfiirmative Action. GCRR. 

500-CS-3000-R$ Opposing English as OfTi- 
cial Language of the United States. GCRR. 

520-CS-3000-R Communist Imperialism. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Tavares, 
Florida. 

521-CS-3O0O-R Changing Family. EPA. 

611-CS-3000-R Aids and the Healing Mini- 
stry of the Church. GBCS, GBGM. 

612-CS-3000-R In Support of Self Deter- 
mination and Nonintervention. GBCS, MAR- 
CHA, + Dorothy S. Darling, UMC, Odessa, New 
York. 

613-CS-3000-R PhiUppines. GBGM. 

614-CS-3000-R Southern Africa. GBGM. 

615-CS-30O0-R Religious Liberty. GBCS. 

616-CS-3000-R New Issues in Human 
Rights. GBCS + MARCHA and 1 individual. 

617-CS-3000-R Opposing Making English 
the Omcial Language. GBCS + Methodists As- 
sociated Representing the, Cause of Hispanic 
Americans. 

618-CS-3000-R Ku Klux Klan and Other 
Hate Groups in the U.S. GBGM. 

619-CS-3000-R Prejudice Against Muslims 
and Arabs in the USA. GBGM. 

620-CS-3000-R Sexual Harassment in 
Church and Society in the USA. GBCS, CSRW. 

621-CS-3000-R Economic Justice. GBCS, 
GBGM + Methodists Associated Representing, 
the Cause of Hispanic Americans. 

622-CS-3000-R Rights of Workers. GBCS 
+ Methodists Associated Representing the. 
Cause of Hispanic Americans. 

623-CS-3000-R Pay Equity in the U.S.A. 
GBGM, GCSW, Methodists Associated 
Representing, the Cause of Hispanic Americans 

$34-CS-3000-R Peace, Justice and 
Reunification of Korea. GBGM. 



635-CS-3000-R Global Debt Crisis. GBGM 
+ Methodists Associated Representing the. 
Cause of Hispanic Americans. 

636-CS-3000-R Housing GBCS + Dorothy 
S. Darling, UMC, Odessa, New York. 

637.CS-3000.R A Call to Care. GBCS. 

639-CS-3000-R Victims of Crime. GBCS. 

640-CS-3000-R Nuclear Safety in the 
United States. GBCS and Dorothy S. Darling, 
UMC, Odessa, New York. 

641-CS-3000-R Suicide: A Challenge to 
Ministry. GBCS. 

643-CS-3000-R Supportive Policies for 
Families with Children. GBCS. 

644-CS-3000-R« Infant Formula. GBCS. 

645-CS-3000-R Japanese-American 

Redress. GBCS. 

646-CS-3000-R Public Education. GBCS + 
Dorothy S. Darling, UMC, Odessa, New York 

647-CS-3000-R Mental Health. GBCS. 

648-CS-3000-R US Agriculture and Rural 
Communities in Crisis. GBCS, GBGM, + 
Dorothy S. Darling, UMC, Odessa, New York. 

650-CS-3000-R Abortion. Members, 

Antwerp UMC, Antwerp, Ohio. 

654-CS-3000-R Protecting and Sustaining 
Children. GBGM, GCSW. 

656-CS-3000-R Aging. GBOD, GBGM, 
OAMN. 

897-CS-3000-R Sexual Violence and Por- 
nography. UCOM. 

941-CS-3000-R Redress for Japanese 
American Internment. ORI. 

942-CS-3000-R Support for Justice for 
Minoru Yasui. ORI. 

1025-CS-3000-R Report from the Infant 
Formula Task Force. GBCS. 

1056-CS-3000-R Economic Boycotts. 
ECBY. 

1088-CS-3000-R Central America, 
Sanctuary and Undocumented Workers in the 
United States. Sanctuary Committee, Dumbar- 
ton UMC, Washington, DC, + Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Germantown, Pennsyl- 
vania 

1102-CS-3000-R$ Developing an AIDS 
Ministry. NHA Council on Ministries. 

1258-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
AKM + 3 local churches. 

1262-CS-3000-R$ Exchange of USA/USSR 
Citizens. Administrative Council, First UMC, 
Ticonderoga, New York. 

1278-CS-3000-R South African Invest- 
ment. WNY. 

1290-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
Charge Conference, Cloverdale UMC, Dothan, 



1353-CS-3000-R Sexist Language and the 
Scriptures. Administrative Board, Evangelical 
UMC, Brainerd, Minnesota 

1354-CS-3000-R Support English as omcial 
language of U.S. Members, ST. Mark UMC, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

1376-CS-3000-R Prohibit use of alcohol, 
tobacco or other drugs. Watford Reed, Lincoln 
Street UMC, Portland, Oregon. 

1377-CS-3000-R Organ and Tissue Dona- 
tions. BAL delegation. 



1378-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
Church Conference, Paradise Hills UMC, Albu- 
querque, New Mexico. 

1379-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Church Conference, Paradise Hills UMC, Albu- 
querque, New Mexico. 

1380-CS-3000-R Against Pornography 
Administrative Board, Epworth UMC, Ripley, 
West Virginia. 

1381-CS-3000-R Recognition of Ministries 
of Homosexual Persons. SNE Board of Church 
and Society. 

1382-CS-3000-R$ Substance Abuse. SNE 
Board of Church and Society. 

1417-CS-3000-R Central American Peace 
Pltin. FLA Work Area on Church and Society. 

1418-CS-3000-R Abortion. Members, 
Whatcoat UMC, Camden, Delaware. 

1461-CS-3000-R Terrorism. Henry F. 
Schwarzmann, BAL. 

1465-CS-3000-R Wamography Henry F. 
Schwarzmann, BAL. 

1466-CS-3000-R Freedom, Democracy and 
Peace. Administrative Council, Asbury UMC, 
Vera Beach, and Administrative Boards, First 
UMC, Ormond Beach and UMC, Satellite 
Beach, Florida 

1467-CS-3000-R Church's past errors 
toward Native Americans. YEL. 

1498-CS-3000-R Keep church out of 
politics. The Seekers, First UMC, Lindale, 
Texas. 

1504-CS-3000-R Arab-Israeli Conflict. 
StewartLanier, SNE, and W. Paul Lanier,FLA. 

1509-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Members, Trinity UMC, Rensselaer, Indiana. 

1519-CS-3000-R Southern Africa. GBPN. 

1523-CS-3000-R Political Involvement. 
Administrative Council, Gardnertown UMC, 
Newburgh, New York. 

1525-CS-3000-R Human Sexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Callaway UMC, Callaway, 
Nebraska 

1526-CS-3000-R AIDS and the Church. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Gardnertown UMC, New- 
burgh, New York. 

1556-CS-3000-R Economic Consequences 
of Taxation. Social and Economic Justice 
Division, WIS Board of Church and Society 

1557-CS-3000-R Paid Surrogate Contracts. 
Joseph R. Anderson, VIR. 

1558-CS-3000-R Federal Funds for Indian 
Health Services. J. Ray McGilbray, OKI + 3 
other individuals. 

1592-CS-3000-R Adopt stronger stand on 
abortion. Lisa M. Lattla, Waterville UMC, 
Waterville, Ohio. 

1593-CS-3000-R Abortion. Marion W. 
King, United Methodist Community Church, 
Marathon, Florida 

1594-CS-3000-R$ Call to Care. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Damascus UMC, Damas 
cus, Ohio. 

1595-CS-30O0-R Against Pornography 
Helen K Doll, First UMC, Three Ri 
Michiga/u 



34 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1596-CS-3000-R Against video, TV and 
telephone guidance in sex. Members, First 
UMC, Henderson, Kentucky. 

1656-CS-3000-R Sustainable Development. 
RKM Board of Church and Society. 

1657-CS-3000-R Abortion. Sharon A 
Hardman, WOH and Matthew W. Hardman, 
Union Furnace UMC. Logan, Ohio. 

1658-CS-3000-R United Nations Reform. 
EOH Board of Church and Society. 

1660-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
MOE Tri-County United Methodist Men. 

1661-CS-3000-R$ AIDS. Administrative 
Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, Texas. 

1662-CS-3000-R Sex and Violence on TV. 
RoyE. White, Kirkwood UMC, Kirkwood, Mis- 
souri 

1738-CS-3000-R U.S. EngUsh Constitu- 
tional Amendment. Administrative Board, 
Groesbeck UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1739-CS-3000-R Organ Sharing. UM Ex- 
ploratory Committee on Organ Sharing, + BAL 
delegation. 

1809-CS-3000-R International issues. 
Galen L. and Mary Henrietta Wenger, Trinity 
UMC, Elkhart, Indiana. 

1810-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Madison, 
Florida, and members, Grace UMC, Greenville, 
Mississippi. 

1811-CS-3000-R Taxation and Justice. 
Russ Walker, CNV. 

1894-CS-3000-R Sale and Use of Alcohol 
and Tobacco on Church Property. Administra- 
tive Board, Virginia Beach UMC, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 

1895-CS-3000-R Forgiveness. Edward E. 
Simons, West Burlington UMC, Troy, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

1896-CS-3000-R Response to Human 
Rights Violations in the World. Annual Church 
Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs Ferry, New 
York. 

1897-CS-3000-R Sexual Violence in Por- 
nography. Administrative Council, Pharisburg 
UMC, Marysville, Ohio. 

1898-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
James T. Eilertsen, Virginia Beach UMC, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 

1899-CS-3000-R Promote total abstinence. 
Margaret N. Wilkins, Hazel Crest UMC, Hazel 
Crest, Illinois. 

1900-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, Wiruisor, 
Connecticut. 

1902-CS-3000-R Support national leaders. 
Administrative Board, Gadsden Street UMC, 
Pensacola, Florida. 

1903-CS-3000-R Love and respect for all 
minorities and cultures. D. Ross Bell, First 
UMC, Stroud, Oklahoma. 

1904-CS-30O0-R Israeli-Palestinian Con- 
flict in the West Bank. EOH Board of Church 
and Society. 

2280-CS-3000-R$ Abortion. Juhani 

Pietarinen, FIF + 2 other irtdividuals. 



2293-CS-3000-R$ Publish information on 
land value taxation. Members, Glenn Memorial 
UMC, Atlanta, Georgia. 

2295-CS-3000-R Boycott of Royal 
Dutch/Shell. Methodist Federation for Social 
Action, + Linda Sue Bailey, CIL. 

2296-CS-3000-R Boycott of Royal 
Dutch/Shell. Ronald Bretsch, First UMC, Nor- 
wood, New York. 

2297-CS-3000-R Opposition to church gifts 
to terrorist groups. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Melbourne, Florida. 

2298-CS-3000-R Critical conditions in East 
European countries and churches. David A. 
Giles, William A. Lasher, TRY, + Beth A. 
Long, Saratoga UMC, Saratoga Springs, NY. 

2299-CS-3000-R$ Program Department of 
Alcohol and Drug Concerns. Council on Mini- 
stries, Mineral Springs UMC, Mineral Springs, 
North Carolina. 

2300-CS-3000-R South Africa. Beverly 
Perkins, Grace UMC, Gallipolis, Ohio. 

2302-CS-3000-R Pursuing of peace and 
democracy by democratic and peaceful means. 
Barry J. Woodward, MOE. 

2304-CS-3000-R Withdraw support from 
Washington Office on Latin American Affeiirs. 
Men's Fellowship, Asbury UMC, El Paso, 
Texas. 

2305-CS-3000-R$ Appoint Commission to 
revise Social Principles. Rex Strickland Class, 
Asbury UMC, El Paso, Texas. 

2306-CS-3000-R Homeless. Rex Strickland 
Class, Asbury UMC, El Paso, Texas. 

2307-CS-3000-R$ Study welfare programs. 
Rex Strickland Class, Asbury UMC, El Paso, 
Texas. 

2308-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Tuesday Morning Prayer and Bible Study 
Group, First UMC, Farmington, New Mexico. 

2309-CS-3000-R Pornography. Ladies' 
Morning Bible Study Group, Killeam UMC, 
Tallahassee, Florida. 

2310-CS-3000-R Future use of Statement 
on Agriculture and Rural Life. National 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 8 other 
organizations and 1 individual. 

2311-CS-3000-R Violence on TV. Members, 
Bennett Memorial UMC, Henderson, Kentucky. 

2312-CS-3000-R Implement 

WHO/UNICEF Code. Tern Thomas, Walker 
UMC, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

2313-CS-3000-R Rural Crisis. National 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 4 other 
organizations. 

2314-CS-3000-R Latin American Debt 
Crisis. National United Methodist Rural Fel- 
lowship, + NC and NE Juris. Town and 
Country Associations. 

2315-CS-3000-R Domestic Violence. Na- 
tional United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
Legislative and Executive Committees. 

2316-CS-30O0-R Sexual Violence in Por- 
nography. Administrative Council, Magnolia 
Springs UMC, Marysville, Ohio. 

2317-CS-3000-R Military Conscription, 
Training and Service. i?ei Strickland Class, As- 
bury UMC, El Paso, Texas. 



2318-CS-3000-RFormosan Church. Jonah 
Chang, CNV, and members, Formosan UMC, 
Oakland, California. 

2319-CS-3000-R In support of worker in 
California table grape industry. Methodists As- 
sociated, Representing the Cause of Hispanic 
Americans. 

2321-CS-30OO-R Separation of Church and 
State. George Weir Hartman, WOH. 

2322-CS-30O0-R To Love the Sojourner. 
Methodists Associated, Representing the Cause 
of Hispanic Americans. 

2323-CS-30O0-R$ Helping people who suf- 
fer a famine. Veda Rahkonen, UMC, Helsinki, 
Finland. 

2326-CS-30O0-R$ Bishops Voting Test. 
Methodists United for Peace with Justice. 

2327-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
Members, First UMC, Humble, Texas. 

2328-CS-3000-R Support U.S. Commission 
on improving the effectiveness of the United 
Nations. Franklin C. and Carolyn K. Stark, 
Lake Merritt UMC, Oakland, California. 

2329-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Members, Burgoon UMC, Burgoon, Ohio. 

2330-CS-3000-R Homosexual Conduct and 
Lifestyle. Administrative Council, Peace UMC, 
Louisville, Ohio. 

2331-CS-3000-R English-only legislation. 
Board of Directors, UM Metropolitan Council 
for the Niagara Frontier. 

2332-CS-3000-R AIDS. Members, Trinity 
UMC, Atlanta, Georgia. 

2333-CS-3000-R South Africa. Administra- 
tive Board, Friendship UMC, Arkadelphia, 
Arkansas. 

2334-CS-3000-R Black-owned farm land. 
Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2335-CS-3000-R Abstinence from tobacco, 
alcohol and other drugs. TEN. 

2336-CS-3000-R Abortion. Nancy J. 
Smith, Waterville UMC, Waterville, Ohio. 

2337-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Administrative Council, Williams Center As- 
bury UMC, Bryan, Ohio. 

2338-CS-3000-R Responsible Parenthood. 
Christian Family Living Class, First UMC, 
Portage, Indiana. 

2339-CS-3000-R Human Sexuality. John 
Lee Temeus, First UMC, Yukon, Oklahoma. 

2340-CS-3000-R Drug Abuse. John Lee 
Temeus, First UMC, Yukon, Oklahoma. 

2341-CS-3000-R Afghanistan. John Lee 
Temeus, First UMC, Yukon, Oklahoma. 

2342-CS-3000-R$ Sponsor educational and 
exchange programs between American and 
Soviet people. Henry F. Schwarzmann, BAL. 

2343-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Members, Red House UMC, Richmond, Ken- 
tucky. 

2344-CS-3000-R A Time for Peace in the 
Middle East. Shirley S. Hoover, SNE. 

2345-CS-3000-R In support of English as 
official language of U.S. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Mt. Gilead, North Carolina. 

2346-CS-3000-R In support of English as 
the official language in the U.S. Administrative 
Council, Trinity UMC, Louisville, Kentucky. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



35 



2347-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Administrative Council, Grace UMC, Willard, 
Ohio. 

2348-CS-30O0-R Against Pornography. 
Elnor Heckert, Circleville UMC, North Hun 
tingdon, Pennsylvania. 

2349-CS-3000-R Indoor Air Pollution 
John P. Miles, LRK, and George D. McClain, 
NYK, + Jo Ann Miles, St. James UMC, Little 
Rock, AR. 

2350-CS-3000-R Mozambique. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 

2351-CS-3000-R Southern Africa. 
Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

2352-CS-3000-R National Security State. 
Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

2353-CS-3000-R Toxic Waste and Race. 
Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

2355-CS-3000-R Defending Creation. 
Members, First UMC, Stillwater, Minnesota. 

2356-CS-3000-R Protection of society. 
Members, Oakridge UMC, Oakridge, Oregon. 

2357-CS-3000-R Life as a Sacred Trust. 
Members, Oakridge UMC, Oakridge, Oregon. 

2358-CS-3000-R Abortion. Eber and Elsie 
Coil, First UMC, Flora, Illinois. 

2359-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Administrative Board, Holy Cross UMC, 
Ridgeley, West Virginia. 

2360-CS-3000.R$ Peace with the USSR. 
Warren K. Eister, Epworth UMC, 

Gaithersburg, Maryland. 

2361-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Lois C. Lee, West Portland UMC, Portland, 
Oregon. 

2362-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Velma Clark, UMC, Silver Springs, New York. 

2363-CS-3000-R Against Pornography. 
Patrick M. McNair, First UMC, Midland, 
Texas. 

2364-CS-3000-R Philippines. National 
Federation, Asian American United Methodists. 

2365-CS-3000-R "English-Plus" Move- 
ment. National Federation, Asian American 
United Methodists. 

2366-CS-3000-R Unemployment. Stephen 
J White, WVA. 

2367-CS-3000-R Abortion. Administrative 
Council, Peace UMC, Louisville, Ohio and Ad- 
ministrative Board, McDonaldsville St. Paul 
UMC, North Canton, Ohio. 

2368-CS-3000-R Gun Control. David 
Koopmans, Oquawka UMC, Biggsville, Illinois. 

2369-CS-3000-R Sanctuary Movement. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Montrose, 
Colorado. 

2370-CS-3000-R Nicaragua. Administra- 
tive Board, First UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2372-CS-3000-R South Africa. AdminUtra- 
live Board, First UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2373-CS-3000-R International Nuclear 
Disarmament. Administrative Board, First 
UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2374-CS-3000-R Abortion. Members, 
Grand Avenue UMC, Salina, Kansas. 

2375-CS-3000-R Condemn publication and 
distribution of pornographic and erotic 



materials. Members, St. Paul UMC, Midland, 
Texas. 

2376-CS-3000-R Sexual Harassment 
MAW Commission on the Status and Role of 
Women. 

2570-CS-3OOO-R Nicaragua. Beverly 

Perkins, Grace UMC, Gallipolis, Ohio. 

2634-CS-3000-R EngUsh as official lan- 
guage. Donald L. Walters, St. Marks UMC, 
Broomall, Pennsylvania. 

2642-CS-3000-R English as Official Lan- 
guage of the USA. Administrative Board, Con- 
cord UMC, Athens, West Virginia. 

2652-CS-3000-R Rights of Native Peoples 
of the Americas. Native American Internation- 
al Caucus. 

2653-CS-3000-R The United Methodist 
Church and America's Native People. Native 
American International Caucus. 

215-08-3000-8$ Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome and AIDS Related Com- 
plex. MOW. 

436-08-3000-8$ Racial Justice in the 
Church. NYK. 

624-08-3000-8$ Alaska Native Claims Set- 
tlement Act. GBGM + NC and NE Juris. 
Town and Country Asso., and National United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship. 

642-08-3000-8$ Genetic Science. GBCS. 

1655-08-3000-8$ Study of effects of the 
nuclear crisis. WPA. 

1825-08-3000-8$ Establish a Study Com 
mission on Chemical Dependency/Chemical 
Health. RoberiD. McNeil, ORI and Roger War 
ren, Montavilla UMC, Portland, Oregon. 

2294-08-3000-8$ Task Force to Study pos 
sible Marxist-Leninist influence upon The 
United Methodist Church. AUa Nye Oxendine, 
First UMC, Pembroke, North Carolina. 

2301-08-3000-8$ Task Force to study ways 
to present Christian view of marriage on TV, 
Council on Ministries, Mineral Springs UMC, 
Mineral Springs, North Carolina. 

2324-08-3000-8$ Fact-fmding committee 
to investigate allegations concerning air 
transportation. Carol A. Colbeth, 

Metropolitan Memorial UMC, Washington, DC. 

2325-08-3000-8$ Task Force to study ways 
to present Christian view of sexuality on TV. 
Council on Ministries, Mineral Springs UMC, 
Mineral Springs, North Carolina. 

2371-08-3000-8$ Study to understand na- 
ture of homosexuality. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2660-08-3000-8$ Surrogate Motherhood. 
Members, West Chelmsford UMC, West 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 



Discipleship 



2116-DI-200-D Exhorter. Cari L. Pocock, 
UMC, Burton City, Ohio. 

54-DI-275-D Change "Lay Speaker" to "Lay 
Minister". CNV. 

392-DI-275-D Ministries with All Language 
and Cultural Groups. GCRR. 

706-DI-275-D Lay Speaker. GBOD. 



1764-DI-275-D Change "Lay Speaking" to 
"Lay Ministry". KEN Committee on Laity. 

1960-DI-275-D Reporting names of ap- 
plicants for Lay Speaker. Ruby Cairns, Asbury 
UMC, Canton, Ohio. 

707-DI-276-D Certified Lay Speaker. 
GBOD. 

393-DI-277-D Ministries with All Language 
and Cultural Groups. GCRR. 

708-DI-277-D Certification of Certified Lay 
Speaker. GBOD. 

778-DI-635-D Jurisdictional Committee on 
United Methodist Men. GBOD. 

118-DI-700-D Conference Board of the 
Laity. MEM. 

117-DI-729-D Camping Ministries. WML 

174-DI-729-D Conference Lay Life and 
Work. GCOM.RIO. 

788-DI-729-D Conference Board of Dis- 
cipleship. GBOD. 

789-DI-729-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Board of Discipleship. GBOD. 

790-DI-729-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Board of Discipleship. GBOD. 

1451-DI.729-D Conference Board of the 
Laity. Lonnie D. Brooks, Christ UMC, Sugar 
Land, Texas. 

2252-DI-729-D Conference Board of the 
Laity. National Association, Annual Con- 
ference Lay Leaders. 

2463-DI-729-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Board of Discipleship. CAP Cabinet + 
2 other individuals. 

1453-DI-746-D District Lay Leader. Lonnie 
D. Brooks, Christ UMC, Sugar Land, Texas. 

1539-DI-1202-D Responsibilities of 
General Board of Discipleship. Fred C. Baum, 
DSW, Thomas J. Howard, NIL, and Paul E. 
Mertz, TEX + 6 other youth directors. 

1793-DI-1202-D Responsibilities of 
General Board of Discipleship. Orin Gard, 
OhmerPark UMC, Dayton, Ohio. 

2189-DI-1202-D Responsibilities of 
General Board of Discipleship. Arthur W. 
Swarthout, NEB. 

811-DI-1204-D Membership of General 
Board of Discipleship. GBOD. 

812-DI-1208-D Education Responsibilities. 
GBOD. 

2589-DI-1209-D$ Native American Aware- 
ness Convocation. Native American Interna- 
tional Caucus. 

413-DI-1210-D Mission Education 
Program. GCRR. 

813-DI-1210-D Ministry to Persons with 
Handicapping Conditions. GBHM. 

814-DI-1211-D Church School Extension. 
GBOD. 

815-DI-1212-DEvangeUsm. GBOD. 

816-DI-1213-D Evangelism Respon- 
sibilities. GBOD. 

414-DM214-D Worship Responsibilities. 
GCRR. 

817-DI-1214-D Worship. GBOD. 

818-DI-1214-D Worship Responsibilities. 
GBOD. 

819-DM214-D Worship Responsibilities. 
GCRR. 



36 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



820-DM214-D Worship Responsibilities. 
GBOD. 

2190-DI-1214-D Duties of Section on Wor- 
ship. Paul F. Perry, SWT. 

821-DM215-D Stewardship. GBOD. 

1043-DI-1215-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

1152-DI-1215-D Stewardship Respon- 
sibilities of the Genertil Board of Discipleship. 
GCFA. 

822-DM217-D Ministiy of the Laity. 
GBOD. 

142-DI-1218-D Leadership Development 
and Training Possibilities. MEM. 

823-DI-1218-D Leadership and Ministry 
Development. GBOD. 

824-DM219-D Age-Level and Family Min- 
istries. GBOD. 

2043-DI-1219-D Add Scouting to Age Level 
tmd Family Ministries responsibilities. Wil- 
liam E. Ballard, IWA + NC and NE Jurisdic- 
tion, Town and Country Asso. ■^ Nat UM Rural 
Fellowship. 

415-DI-1220-D Committee on FamUy Life. 
GCRR. 

1492-DI-1221-D Comprehensive Youth 
Ministiy. Fred C. Baum, DSW, Thomas J. 
Howard, NIL, + 6 directors of youth ministries. 

894-DI-1222-D United Methodist Men. 
GBOD. 

825-DI-1224-D Curriculum Resources 
Committee. GBOD. 

826-DI-1226-D Relationships. GBOD. 

827-DI-1227-D The Editor of Church 
School Publications. GBOD. 

828-DI-1228-D Membership of Curriculum 
Resources Committee. GCAH. 

829-DI-1228-D Membership of Curriculum 
Resources Committee. GBOD. 

554-DI-1300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Convocation. NYMO. 

555-DI-1300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Legislative Assembly. NYMO. 

556-DI-1300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Steering Committee. NYMO. 

557-DI-1300-D Staff, National Youth Mini- 
stry Organization. NYMO. 

558-DI-1300-D Youth Service Fund. 
NYMO, SONY. 

559-DI-1300-D Project Review Committee. 
NYMO, SONY. 

560-DI-1300-D$ National Youth Ministry 
Organization Funding. NYMO, SONY. 

1046-DI-1300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Convocation. SCNY. 

1047-DI-1300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Caucus. SCNY. 

1048-DM300-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Steering Committee. SCNY. 

1049-DM300-D Staff-National Youth 
Ministry Organization. SCNY. 

550-DM301-D National Youth Ministiy 
Organization. NYMO, SCNY. 

1265-DI-1301-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization. FredC. Baum, DSW, Thomas J. 
Howard, NIL, and Paul E. MerU, TEX + 6 
other youth directors. 



1493-DM301-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization. Kevin K. Slimp, First UMC, 
Lakeland, Florida. 

5S1-DI-1302-D Accountability of National 
Youth Ministries. NYMO. 

1044-DI-1302-D Accountability of National 
Youth Ministry Organization. SCNY. 

1494-DI-1302-D Delete Par. 1302.1-4 and 
renumber Par. 1302.5. Fred C. Baum, DSW, 
Thomas J. Howard, NIL, and Paul E. MerU, 
TEX + 5 other youth directors. 

1570-DI-1302-D Delete Par. 1302. KevinK. 
Slimp, First UMC, Lakeland, Florida. 

652-DI-1303-D Purpose of National Youth 
Ministry Organization. NYMO, SCNY. 

1495-DI-1303-D National Youth Ministry 
Organization Funding. Fred C. Baum, DSW, 
Thomas J. Howard, NIL, and Paul E. MerU, 
TEX + 6 other youth directors. 

553-DI-1304-D Structure of National Youth 
Ministry Organization. NYMO. 

1045-DI-1304-D Structure of National 
Youth Ministry Organization. SCNY. 

1496-DI-1304-D Delete Par. 1304. KevinK. 
Slimp, First UMC, Lakeland, Florida. 

1743-DI-3000-D Use New International 
Version of the Bible in Psalter and other read- 
ings. Administrative Council, First UMC. Car- 
dington, and Administrative Board, Church of 
the Cross, WoosUr, Ohio. 

253-DI-3000-M Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Council, St Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska. 

254-DI-3000-M Retain "Have Thine Own 
Way". Members, Strange Creek UMC, Strange 
Creek, West Virginia. 

2S6-DI-3000-M Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Saxton UMC, Saxton, Pen- 
nsylvania 

257-DI-3000-M Communion Ritual. Wil- 
liam Welsh, St James UMC, Miamisburg, 
Ohio. 

528-DI-3000-M God Our Father. Grace E. 
Drake, First UMC, Pontiac, Illinois. 

251-DI-3000-R Resources for AIDS Educa- 
tion. TRY. 

252-DI-3000-R Metronome Tempo 
Markins in Hymnal. TRY. 

25S-DI-3000-R Include "Battle Hymn of the 
Republic" and "Onward, Christian Soldiers" in 
new hymnal. Odie Gregg, NAL + 3 local chur- 
ches. 

258-DI-3000-R On Biblical Language. NIN. 

259-DI-3000-R Family Enrichment 
Resources. NIN. 

265-DI-3000-R Kingdomtide. CAP. 

529-DI-3000-R Full report of the Hymnal 
Revision Committee. HYMC. 

657-DI-3000-R Book of Worship. GBOD. 

661-DI-3000-RThe United MethodistHym- 
nal. GBOD, GBPB. 

1027-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Church 
Conference, First UMC, Atlanta, Texas. 

1028-DI-3000-R Sunday school literature. 
Church Conference, First UMC, Atlanta, Texas. 

1057-DI-3000-R Report of the 
NYMO/NOD Study Committee. SCNY. 



1058-DI-3000-R Recommendations from 
NYMO/BOD Study Committee. SCNY. 

1073-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Mem- 
bers, Albright UMC, St Petersburg, Florida. 

109S-DI-3000-R Enabling Petition. 
HYMC. 

1103-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Bert 
Ballengee, Polk Street UMC, Amarillo, Texas. 

1269-DI-3000-R Ritual of "Solemnization of 
Marriage". Delia Grace Cox, Fountain City 
UMC, Knoxville, Tennessee. 

1336-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Mem- 
bers, Highland Springs UMC, Highland 
Springs, Virginia. 

1345-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Centenary UMC, Lexi- 
ngton, Kentucky. 

1346-DI-3000-R Inclusive language in the 
hymnal. Administrative Board, Campbell 
UMC, Campbell, New York -f 2 individuals. 

1358-DI-3000-R Terms of reference to the 
Deity. Administrative Boards, San Jacinto 
UMC, Amarillo, Channing & Middlewell 
UMCs, Channing and UMC,Lazbuddie + mem- 
bers, 10th Ave. UMC, Amarillo, Texas. 

1383-DI-3000-R Hymnal Revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Levy UMC, North Little 
Rock, Arkansas. 

1385-DI-3000-R Liturgical Language. 
Members, Emmanuel UMC, Penns Grove, New 
Jersey. 

1387-DI-3000-R Retain traditional 
Trinitarian formula. J. Cecil Williamson, 
NMS, + 19 local churches and 3 individuals. 

1388-DI-3000-R Changes to the Bible. 
Members, Mount Israel UMC, Tunnelton, West 
Virginia. 

1403-DI-3000-R Use and endorsement of 
Bible translations. Administrative Council, 
Paulding UMC, Paulding, Ohio. 

142 1-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. Holly 
Swihart, UMC, Leachville, Arkansas. 

1488-DI-3000-R Terminology in Service of 
Holy Commimion. Maurice E. Graham, 
Chalybeate UMC, Hillsboro, Alabama. 

1497-DI-3000-R Keep hymnal as is. The 
Seekers, First UMC, Lindale, Texas. 

1502-DI-3000-R Retain traditional 
Trinitarian formula and Scriptural terms for 
deity. Members, Christ UMC, Kingston, Rhode 
Island. 

1515-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language. 
Administrative Board, Utica Asbury UMC, 
Frankfort, New York. 

1527-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language 
in educationcd materials. Administrative 
Boards, St John and Fairview UMCs, 
Stoutsville, Ohio. 

1528-DI-300O-R Inclusive Language. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Gardnertown UMC, New- 
burgh, New York. 

1S40-DI-3000-R Use Revised Standard Ver- 
sion of the Bible in Psalter and other readings. 
Administrative Board, Alger Memorial UMC, 
Eaton, Colorado. 

1545-DI-3000-R The Trinity. Administra- 
tive Council, Rutland UMC, Rutland, Ohio. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



37 



1559-DI-3000-R Inclusive language for 
Scripture and Hymnal. J. Quintan Covington, 
NCA + members, Midway-Bethlehem Charge, 
Swansboro, NC. 

1560-DI-3000-R No change in wording of 
Bible, hymned or liturgy. Administrative Coun- 
cil, Fairview UMC, Texarkana, Arkansas. 

1566-DI-3000-R Retain historic and biblical 
Trinitarian formula. OrenD. Schaffer, WOH + 
3 local churches. 

1568-DI-3000-R Use of All-inclusive lan- 
guage. Administrative Council, Harrison 
Chapel UMC, Killen, AlabamcL 

1597-DI-3000-R God the Father. Dorine G. 
Jenkins, Asbury UMC, Utica, New York. 

1598-DI-3000-R Opposed to changing to 
non-biblical language. Sunday School class. 
First UMC, Clyde, Texas. 

1599-DI-3000-R Retain liturgical referen- 
ces. Administrative Board, Putnam City UMC, 
Oklahoma City, OklahomcL 

1600-DI-3000-R Terminology in the Scrip- 
tures. Members, Elwood UMC, Midway, Texas. 

1604-DI-3000-R Faith in the Holy Trinity. 
Members, First UMC, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

1664-DI-3000-R AMENs on hymns. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Grace UMC, Topeka, Kan- 
sas. 

1665-DI-3000-R Historical Trinitarian 
Ltinguage. Administrative Board, Oak Grove 
UMC, Decatur, Georgia. 

1666-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language. 
Administrative Board, UMC, Mt. Bethel, 
Alabama, Administrative Council, Wesley 
Chapel UMC, Florence, Alabama and members. 
First UMC, Liverpool, New York. 

1667-DI-3000-R Retain traditional referen- 
ces to Trinity. Administrative Board, UMC, 
Berryville, Arkansas. 

1668-DI-3000-R Use traditional language 
in new Book of Worship. Adminis/raftue Board, 
Alger Memorial UMC, Eaton, Colorado. 

1669-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Waterville UMC, Wate'r- 
ville, Ohio. 

1670-DI-3000-R Include "In the Garden" in 
new hymnal. Owen S. Aspinall, Palisade 
UMC, Palisade, Colorado. 

1671-DI-3000-R Traditional language. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Church of the Cross, 
Wooster, Ohio. 

1672-DI-3000-R Retain traditional 
Trinitarian formula in liturgy. Estell Casebier, 
LVL, Paul Jaw, NNJ, E. C. Johnson, VIR + 
18 local churches and 5 individuals. 

1673-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. 
United Methodist Women, Chelyan UMC, 
Chelyan, West Virginia. 

1674-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. John 
M. McCormack, NAK. 

1675-DI-3000-R Hymnal and Hymnal Lan- 
guage. Members, UMC, Manlius, and Delphi 
Falls UMC, Cazenovia, New York. 

1676-DI-3000-R Resources for local church 
libraries. Maryann J. Dotts, Cape Coral First 
UMC, Cape Coral, Florida. 

1677-DI-3000-R Prohibit displaying nation- 
al flag in sanctuary. Norman E. Smith, SNJ. 



1678-DI-3000-R Retain language of present 
hymnal in hynms, ritual and responsive read- 
ings. Administrative Board, First UMC, Port 
St. Joe, Florida. 

1679-DI-3000-R Use scriptural language in 
liturgy. Administrative Council, Oceanport 
UMC, Oceanport, New Jersey. 

1680-DI-30O0-R Inclusive language in the 
Bible. Administrative Council, Washington 
UMC, Washington, Kentiicky. 

1685-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language and Its 
Limits. Pastor-Parish Relations Committee, 
Stehman Memorial UMC, Millersville, Pen- 
nsylvania. 

1686-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. Mem- 
bers, Maynard Avenue UMC, Columbus, Ohio. 

1687-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. Mem- 
bers, Sidney-Zephyr UM Charge, Zephyr, Texas. 

1688-DI-3000-R Retain Scriptural 
Trinitarian formula. Members, First UMC, 
Glassboro, New Jersey. 

1693-DI-3000-R Retain original intent of 
authors of hymns. Administrative Board, Oak- 
land UMC, Marion, Ohio. 

1740-DI-3000-R Apostles' Creed. Shelton 
Spivey, Whaleyville UMC, Suffolk, Virginia. 

1741-DI-3000-R Footnote in new hymnal 
explaining "catholic". Bernard S. Via Jr., VIR, 
+ members of 3 local churches and 1 individual. 

1742-DI-3000-R Passing communion ele- 
ments. Anna E. Umbarger, Mt. Vernon Place 
UMC, Washington, DC. 

1744-DI-3000-R Worship and the Trinity. 
Administrative Council, First UMC, Car- 
ding ton, Ohio. 

1745-DI-3000-R Include "Arise, My Soul, 
Arise" in new hymnal. Riley B. Case, NIN, 
Robert D. Snyder, EOH, and Michael W. 
Walker, NTX + 3 local churches. 

1746-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language. 
Administrative Board, Wesley UMC, Fostoria, 
Ohio. 

1754-DI-3000-R Book of Worship. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Plymouth, 
Michigan. 

1816-DI-3000-R Inclusive Language. Mem- 
bers, Burgoon UMC, Burgoon, Ohio. 

1905-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language. 
Administrative Council, First UMC, Crosbyton, 
Texas. 

1906-DI-3000-R Inclusive language in wor- 
ship. Leon H. Hevener, WVA. 

1911-DI-3000-R Hymnal Revision. Mem- 
bers, St. Charles UMC, St. Charles, Arkansas. 

2377-DI-3000-R Retain original words of 
Charles Wesley's hymns in new hymnal. 
Howard L. Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, 
Texas. 

2378-DI-3000-R$ Hold School of Evan- 
geUsm for Native Americans. Native American 
International Caucus. 

2379-DI-3000-R Statement of Faith for new 
hymnal. Members, Swaim Memorial UMC, 
Jacksonville, Florida. 

2380-DI-3000-R Approve new hymnal 
without further inclusions or deletions. Mem- 
bers, West Chelmsford UMC, West Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts. 



2381-DI-3000-R$ Develop program to 
strengthen Native American family. Native 
American International Caucus. 

2382-DI-3000-R Appreciation to leaders 
Eind members of Hymnal Revision Committee. 
EOH Commission on the Status and Role of 
Women. 

2383-DI-3000-R$ National Convocation for 
Native American Youth. Native American In- 
ternational Caucus. 

2384-DI-3000-R$ Resources on Black 
Family Life. Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal, Inc. 

2385-DI-3000-R Include "Those Who Love 
and Those Who Labor" in new hymnal. David 
Ritchie, Liverpool UMC, Liverpool, New York. 

2386-DI-3000-R Opposition to fermented 
wine in Service of Holy Communion. Leon H. 
Hevener, WVA. 

2387-DI-3000-R Hymnal Revision. Mem- 
bers, Swaim Memorial UMC, Jacksonville, 
Florida. 

2388-DI-3000-R$ Resources for families of 
incarcerated persons. Black Methodists for 
Church Renewal, Inc. 

2389-DI-3000-R Prohibit change in United 
Methodist hymnals. Claude D. Page, Forest 
Park UMC, Lima, Ohio. 

2390-DI-3000-R Use a standard authorized 
translation of the Bible in Psalter of new hym- 
nal. Michael W. Walker, NTX. 

2391-DI-3000-R Include "Bring Many 
Names" in new hymnal. Gerarda Louise Sem- 
ran, DET, + Methodist Federation for Social 
Action. 

2392-DI-3000-R Be faithful to Articles of 
Religion in new hymnal. Administrative 
Board, Oakwood UMC, Lubbock, Texas. 

2394-DI-3000-R$ Resources for Class 
Meetings. Veda Rahkonen, UMC, Helsinki, 
Finland. 

2395-DI-30O0-R Psalter. Council on Mini- 
stries, Lacon UMC, Lacon, Illinois. 

2396-DI-3000-R Include "Stand Up, Stand 
Up for Jesus" in new hymnal. Members, St. 
Stephen's UMC, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

2397-DI-3000-R Exclude "Strong Mother 
God" from new hymnal. Members, St. Stephen's 
UMC, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

2398-DI-3000-R Ritual for Infant Dedica- 
tion. Members, First UMC, Welch, West Vir- 
ginia. 

2399-DI-3000-R Service of Baptism. Adele 
A. Niblack, St. Andrew UMC, Florissant, Mis- 
souri. 

2400-DI-3000-R Service of Baptism. Philip 
M. Niblack, MOE. 

2401-DI-3000-R Service of Christian Mar- 
riage. Ronald D. Pogue, TEX. 

2402-DI-3000-R Service of Christian Mar- 
riage. David H. Nikkei, EOH. 

2403-DI-3000-R Oppose establishing offi- 
cial United Methodist creed. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Murrysville, Pennsylvania. 

2404-DI-3000-R Reception into The United 
Methodist Church. Max E. Goldman, IWA. 



38 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



2405-DI-30O0-R Alternate Psalter. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Virginia Beach UMC, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 

2406-DI-3000-R Include "Strong Mother 
God" in new hymnal. Quentin L. Hand, NGA + 
Administrative Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate 
UMC, Atlanta, Georgia. 

2407-DI-3000-R Image of God as Father. 
Members, Wesley Chapel UMC, Ruston, 
Louisiana. 

2491-DI-3000-R Retain present position on 
Trinitarian understanding of God. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Spring Woods UMC, Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

2492-DI-3000-R Reject legislating specific 
references to God in worship. Sally W. Daniel 
and Quentin L. Hand, NGA. 

2493-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Cloverdale UMC, Clover- 
dale, Alabama. 

2494-DI-3000-R Language about God. Es- 
tellR. Casebier, LVL. 

2495-DI-3000-R Opposition to changing 
the Word. Members, Mount Israel UMC, 
Evansville, West Virginia. 

2496-DI-3000-R Inclusive language. Elene 
Rushing, Massac UMC, Paducah, Kentucky. 

2497-DI-3000-R Inclusive language. Maxi- 
ne Manering, Ashford UMC, Houston, Texas. 

2498-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Mem- 
bers, Hickory Ridge-Tilton Charge, Hickory 
Ridge, Arkansas. 

2499-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Mem- 
bers, Oakland UMC, Marion, Ohio. 

2500-DI-3000-R Standards for Trinitarian 
references in United Methodist literature and 
liturgy. Members, St Paul UMC, Midland, 
Texas. 

2502-DI-3000-R Service of Baptism. Ad- 
ministrative Councils, Hampton, Harrell and 
Faustina UMCs, Hampton, Arkansas. 

2503-DI-3000-R Inclusive language. Mem- 
bers, Burgoon UMC, Burgoon, Ohio. 

2504-DI-3000-R Addressing the Trinity. 
Church Conference, Trinity UMC, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

2505-DI-3000-R Inclusive language. Nancy 
J. Smith, Waterville UMC, Waterville, Ohio. 

2506-DI-3000-R Inclusive language. Mem- 
bers, Trinity UMC, Oswego, New York. 

2507-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Faith UMC, Vernon, Texas. 

2508-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Holy Cross UMC, Ridgeley, 
West Virginia. 

2510-DI-3000-R Hynmal revision. Donna 
B. Hooker, UMC, Leachville, Arkansas. 

2511-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Nation- 
al Federation, Asian American United 
Methodists. 

2512-DI-3000-R "O, For a Thousand Ton- 
gues to Sing" in new hymnal. Members, St 
Stephen's UMC, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

2S13-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Prospect Park UMC, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. 



25 14-DI-3000-R Retain present language in 
worship and ritual. Members, First UMC, 
Haleyville, Alabama. 

2516-DI-3000-R$ Separate English and 
Sptmish hymnals. Young Adult Sunday School 
Class, Corinth UMC, Cunningham, Kentucky. 

2516-DI-3000-R Hymnal language. Mem- 
bers, Grand Avenue UMC, Salina, Kansas. 

2517-DI-3000-R Retain historic and biblical 
Trinitarian formula in total liturgy. Members, 
Hope UMC, Whitehouse, Ohio. 

2518-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Friendship UMC, Arkadel- 
phia, Arkansas. 

2519-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Wesley 
Class, Henderson UMC, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

2520-DI-3000-R Terms "Negro Spiritual" 
and "African-American" in new hymnal. Black 
Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2521-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Virginia Beach UMC, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 

2522-DI-3000-R Use of Trinitarian lan- 
guage in liturgy. Members, Marquis Memorial 
UMC, Staunton, Virginia. 

2523-DI-3000-R The Trinity in hymnology 
and liturgy. Administrative Board, St Paul 
UMC, El Campo, Texas. 

2524-DI-3000-R Use of Trinitarian formula 
in United Methodist literature and hymneils. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Cherokee, 
Alabama. 

2525-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Afem- 
bers, Jamestown UMC, Jamestown, Ohio. 

2526-DI-3000-R Hymnal revision. Mary 
Lou Wurth, Corinth UMC, Cunningham, Ken- 
tucky. 

2527-DI-3000-R Reception of Members. 
Members, Embury UMC, Millington, Ten- 
nessee. 

2528-DI-3000-R Use of inclusive language 
in worship materials. Afemiers, UMCs, Ashford 
andPlymouth, New Hampshire, andMerrimac- 
port, Massachusetts. 

2529-DI-3000-R Opposition to use of con- 
flictive language in publications, institutions 
and teachings of UMC. Administrative Board, 
Killen UMC, Killen, Alabama. 

2530-DI-3000-R Psalter. Members, First 
UMC, Wellington, Texas. 

2635-DI-3000-R Metrical markings. D. 
Jean Hanson, Bethany UMC, Tacoma, 
Washington. 

2636-DI-3000-R Book of Hymns and Songs. 
D. Jean Hanson, Bethany UMC, Tacoma, 
Washington. 

2658-DI-3000-R$ Study "inclusive lan- 
guage" of the Scriptures. Adminis/ra/iye Board, 
Hayes UMC, Fremont, Ohio. 

658-DI-3000-S$ Meaning of Baptism. 
GBOD. 

1263-DI-3000-S$ Study Commission on the 
Organization of Loced United Methodist Chur- 
ches. Charles A. Sayre, SNJ. 

1270-DI-3000-S$ Joint Committee to Plan 
Mission Education for Children. SWT United 
Methodist Women. 



Financial Administration 

106-FA-700-D Basic Salary Plan. CPA, 
SNE, WYO. 

107-FA-700-D Basic Salary Plan. CPA. 

108-FA-700-D Basic Salary Plan. WYO. 

1 13-FA-700-D Shared Salary Option. EPA, 
NIL, NIN, NYK, ORI, SIN, TRY, WNY, WVA, 
+ Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

260-FA-700-D District Council on Finance 
and Administration. Jim Beal, NAK. 

2003-FA-700-D Basic Salary Plan. William 
E. Ballard, IWA + NC, NE, SE Jurisdiction, 
WOH Toledo Dist Town and Country Associa- 
tions. 

2174-FA-700-D Basic Salary Plan. United 
Methodist Appalachian Development Commit- 
tee, and National UM Rural Fellowship, Leg. & 
Ex. Cams. 

1773-FA-707-D Optional Conference Coun- 
cil on Finance and Administration. Barrett 
Renfro, SWT. 

401-FA-708-D Membership of Conference 
Council on Finance and Administration. 
GCRR. 

526-FA-708-D Conference Council on 
Finance and Administration. Gary L. Ball-Kil- 
boume, NDK. 

1069-FA.708-D Director of Administra- 
tion/Treasurer. Association of Annual Con- 
ference Treasurers. 

1110-FA-708-D Ex-ofTicio members of the 
Conference Council on Finance and Ad- 
nunistration. GCOM. 

1427-FA-708-D Membership of Conference 
Council on Finemce and Administration. Char- 
les Dailey, EOH. 

402-FA-709-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion. GCRR. 

1070-FA-709-D Director of Administra- 
tion/Treasurer. Association of Annual Con- 
ference Treasurers. 

1402-FA-709-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion. Loran G. Birch, Klamath UMC of the 
Redwoods, Klamath, California. 

1554-FA-709-D Extend funding prohibi- 
tion. Administrative Boards, UMCs, Armona 
andLaton, California. 

2009-FA-709-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion. Administrative Council, Calvary UMC, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

102-FA-710-D Conference Benevolences 
Budget. KEN. 

1583-FA-710-D Annual Conference 
budgets. Charles Dailey, EOH. 

1640-FA-710-D Budgets. DonL. Forsman, 
NMX. 

103-FA-711-D Apportionments. KEN. 

2010-FA-711-D Apportionments. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, San Augus- 
tine, Texas. 

2173-FA-711-D Apportionments. Paul F. 
Perry, SWT. 

2629-FA-711-D Apportionments. Paul 
Wesley, LSA + 3 other individuals. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



39 



1135-FA-713-D Annual Conference Audits. 
GCFA. 

2011-FA-713-D Audits. Western Jurisdic- 
tion College of Bishops. 

104-FA-715-D Conference Treasurer. 
KEN. 

105-FA-715-D Conference Treasurer. WIS. 

1071-FA-715-D Director of Administra- 
tion/Treasurer. Association of Annual Con- 
ference Treasurers. 

1136-FA-715-D Annual Conference Direc- 
tor of Administration/ Treasurer. GCFA. 

1585-FA-715-D Conference treasurer. 
Charles Dailey, EOH. 

1072-FA-716-D Director of Administra- 
tion/Treasurer. Association of Annual Con- 
ference Treasurers. 

1366-FA-717-D Ministerial Support Char- 
les Dailey, EOH. 

963-FA-718-D Change "salaiy" to "support". 
Alex Borsos, Jr, SNJ. 

1367-FA-718-D Ministerial Support. Char- 
les Dailey, EOH. 

1368-FA-719-D Ministerial Support. Char- 
les Dailey, EOH. 

109-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. CNV. 

110-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. CPA. 

111-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. NMS. 

112-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. HOL. 

403-FA-722-D Commission on Equitable 
Salaries. GCRR. 

785-FA-722-D Commission on Equitable 
Salaries. GBHM. 

1137-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. GCFA 

1138-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. GCFA 

1139-FA-722-D Equitable Salaries. GCFA 

1481-FA-722-D Editorial correction. Na- 
tional Association of Commissions on Equi- 
table, Salaries. 

1774-FA-722-D Pastors' Salaries. Western 
Jurisdiction College of Bishops. 

1775-FA-722-D Optional Committee on 
Equitable Salaries. BarreU Renfro, SWT. 

2250-FA-722-D Clergy Couples. Marcus 
Blaising, NIN + 9 other individuals. 

908-FA-723-D Sustentation Fund. GCFA 

506-FA-724-D Pastoral Compensation. 
Perry S. Miller, WNC. 

2012-FA-724-D Reporting of salary sup- 
port. William R. Keeffe, NHA 

1140-FA-735-D Episcopal Residence Com- 
mittee. GCFA 

126-FA-736-D Delete Par. 736.4. NAL. 

407-FA-736-D Conference Board of Pen- 
sions. GCRR. 

961-FA-736-D Proportional Payment. 
GBPN. 

1326-FA-736-D Proportional Payment. 
Administrative Council, St. Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska. 

1783-FA-736-D Membership of Conference 
Board of Pensions. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1872-FA-736-D Board of Pensions. Gerald 
A. Beam, Trinity UMC, Wilmette, Illinois. 

2023-FA-736-D Loss of pension annuity due 
to pastoral chcirge not paying apportionments. 
William E. Ballard, IWA + NE Jurisdiction, 



Town and Country Asso. + Nat UM Rural Fel- 
lowship. 

2024-FA-736-D Conference Board of Pen- 
sions. William R. Keeffe, NHA 

2180-FA-736-D Proportional Payment Es- 
tellR. Casebier, LVL. 

1142-FA-905-D General Council on 
Finance tind Administration Organization. 
GCFA 

1791-FA-905-D Membership of General 
Council on Finance and Administration. 
LeonardD. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

137-FA-906-D Retain Par. 906.12. DET, 
EOH, EPA, FLA, HOL, KEN, LVL, NCA, NDK, 
NWT, SGA, SIL + 421 local groups and 56 in- 
dividuals. 

138-FA-906-D Delete Par. 906.12. GCSW, 
NYMO, CNV, PNW, WIS, + 3 local groups and 
2 individuals. 

139-FA-906-D No curb on discussion, 
debate or education. MOE, NIL, NYK, PNW, 
RKM, TRY, + Methodist Federation for Social 
Action. 

266-FA-906-D Apportionment Cap. Wil- 
liam C. Mason, OKL + 98 local churches and 
20 individuals. 

512-FA-906-D Addition to Par. 906.12. 
GBCS. 

807-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. GBOD. 

940-FA-906-D Funding of Study. ORL 

1118-FA-906-D Distribution from the 
Worid Service Fund. GCFA, GCOM. 

1143-FA-906-D United Methodist Founda- 
tions. GCFA 

1373-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. 
Church Conference, Paradise Hills UMC, Albu- 
querque, New Mexico. 

1483-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. Wen- 
dell A Meggs, TEN. 

1531-FA-906-D$ No curb on discussion on 
homosexuality. Administrative Council, 
Gardnertown UMC, Newburgh, New York. 

1875-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. Wil- 
liam and Penny M. E. Pritchett, Union UMC, 
Bridgeville, Delaware. 

1876-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. Mar- 
garet and M. E. Manlove, Union UMC, 
Bridgeville, Delaware. 

1877-FA-906-D Prohibit funding of abor- 
tion on demand. Administrative Board, West 
Lafayette UMC, West Lafayette, and Council on 
Ministries, Rittman UMC, Rittman, Ohio. 

2036-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. Mem- 
bers, Wesley UMC, Shiloh, and Camden UMC, 
Camden, North Carolina 

2037-FA-906-D Apportionment formula. 
Administrative Council, First UMC, Baird, 
Texas. 

2038-FA-906-D Responsibilities of General 
Council on Finance and Administration. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Baird, Texas. 

2185-FA-906-D Amend Par. 906.12. Quen- 
tin L. Hand, NGA. 

2259-FA-906-D Fiscal responsibilities. 
Marcus Blaising, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, 
St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 



2260-FA-906-D Funding of non-inclusive 
groups. Marcus Blaising, NIN + 3 other in- 
dividuals. 

1039-FA-907-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

1119-FA-907-D Administrative Respon- 
sibilities. GCOM. 

1144-FA-907-D Administrative Respon- 
sibilities of the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. GCFA 

1145-FA-907-D Administrative Respon- 
sibilities of the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. GCFA 

1146-FA-907-D Administrative Respon- 
sibilities of the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. GCFA 

1484-FA-907-D Amend Par. 907.13. Na- 
tional Association of Commission on Equitable, 



2186-FA-907.D Responsibilities of General 
Council on Finance and Administration. Ted 
Gingrich, First UMC, Yuba City, California. 

140-FA-911-D General PoUcies. WPA. 

170-FA-911-D General PoUcies. GCOAf, 
RIO. 

1147-FA-911-D General Policies Related to 
General Funds. GCFA 

1148-FA-911-D General Policies Related to 
General Funds. GCFA 

141-FA-912-D Revision of benevolence 
statement WPA 

267-FA-912-D World Service Fund. R. 
Snyder, EOH, P. Wesley, LSA, E. Stiirzemack- 
er, SIL + 63 local churches and 20 individuals. 

2039-FA-912-D Apportionments. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Baird, Texas. 

2040-FA-912-D World Service Fund. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Grace UMC, Willard, Ohio. 

2261-FA-912-D Apportionments. Marcus 
Blaising, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, SL 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana 

1120-FA-913-D Promotion ofWorid Service 
Special Gifts. GCFA, GCOM. 

384-FA-920-D Temporary General Aid 
Fund. SCA 

914-FA-920-D Temporaiy General Aid 
Fund. GCFA 

268-FA-921-D Ministerial Education Fund. 
Administrative Council, St. Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska, and William C. Mason, OKL. 

411-FA-921-D Temporary General Aid 
Fund. GCRR. 

809-FA-921-D Ministerial Education Fund. 
GBHM. 

1736-FA-921-D Ministerial Education 
Fund. Robert D. Snyder, EOH. 

2041-FA-921-D Ministerial Education 
Fund. Administrative Councils, Thurman and 
Vega UMCs, Administrative Board, UMC, 
Prospect, Ohio. 

2630-FA-923-D Delete Par. 923. Paul Wes- 
ley, LSA + 3 individuals. 

1149-FA-924-D Bishops' Compensation 
and Expense Allowances. GCFA 

2631-FA-925-D Episcopal Fund. Paul Wes- 
ley, LSA + 3 other individuals. 

1150-FA-930-D Bishops' Pensions. GCFA 



40 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1151-FA-931-D Compensation of Bishops 
Relieved of Episcopal Duties. GCFA. 

915-FA-932-D Compensation of Retired 
Bishops Recalled to Active Service. GCFA. 

1126-FA- 1602-D Membership of the 
General Board of Pensions. GCOM. 

1799-FA-1602-D Membership of the 
General Board of Pensions. Leonard D. Slutz, 
HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

147-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions. 
CNV, KSE, KSW, MOE, NIL, NYK, SIN, WIS, 
WMI, + NAKBCS. 

148-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions. 
MOE, NYK, RKM, WIS, WNY + BMCR, and 
Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

149-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions. 
MNE. 

150-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions. 
NCA. 

166-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions. 
SWT. 

264-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions, 
CAP. 

424-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions 
GCRR. 

516-FA-1604-D General Board of Pensions 
GBCS. 

1276-FA-1G04-D General Board of Pen- 
sions. WNY. 

1456-FA-1604-D Social responsibility with 
Ministerial Pension Funds. YEL. 

1648-FA-1604-D Addition to Par. 1604. 
AFL. 

524-FA-1606-D General Board of Pensions. 
GaryL. Ball-Kilboume, NDK. 

857-FA-1606-D Pensions for persons who 
served full-time appointments beyond the local 
church. GBHM. 

964-FA-1606-D Service of a Local Pastor. 
GBPN. 

965-FA-1606-D Service under endorsement 
by Division of Chaplains and Related Mini- 
stries. GBPN. 

2057-FA-1606-D Change of terminology. 
Northeastern Jurisdiction Town and Country 
Asso., Executive Committee. 

2197-FA-1606-D Proportional Comprehen- 
sive Protection Plan Credit. Martha L. 
Mathatas, EOH. 

2058-FA-1609-D Change of terminology. 
Northeastern Jurisdiction Town and Country 
Asso., Executive Committee. 

151-FA-1700-D Cooperative Hymnal. 
CPMC + CNV. 

2059-FA-1702-D Membership of General 
Board of Publication. GBPB. 

858-FA-1706-D Executive Committee of 
General Board of Publication. GCSW. 

859-FA-1734-D Curriculum Resources 
Committee. GBOD. 

860-FA-1737-D Literature published for 
The United Methodist Church. GCSW. 

1457-FA-1737-D Retain Par. 1737. AFL 
UMWEx. Com. + 2 District UMW, and 4 local 
churches. 

1053-FA-1743-D Real Estate and Buildings 
of The United Methodist Publishing House. 
GBPB. 



1054-FA-1744-D Real Estate and Buildings 
of The United Methodist PubUshing House. 
GBPB. 

1157-FA-2501-D Titles to Properties. 
GCFA. 

1158-FA-2502-D Use of name "Methodist" 
or "United Methodist". GCFA 

2269-FA-2502-D Use of the word 
"Methodist". Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew 
UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

1159-FA-2504-D Effect of Union. GCFA 

1160-FA-2505-D Oil, Gas, and Mineral 
Leases. GCFA 

1161-FA-2506-D Conformity of Discipline 
with Local Law. GCFA. 

1162-FA-2507-D Conformity of Deeds and 
Conveyances with Local Law. GCFA. 

153-FA-2512-D Conference Board of Trus- 
tees. GCSW,WVA 

1163-FA-2512-D Annual Conference Board 
of Trustees. GCFA. 

1259-FA-2512-D Annual Conference Board 
of Trustees. Daniel Garc*a, RIO. 

2061-FA-2512-D Conference Board of Trus- 
tees. William E. Ballard, IWA and NC and NE 
Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. + Nat. 
UM Rural Fellowship. 

2062-FA-2512-D Conference Board of Trus- 
tees. William R. Keeffe, NHA. 

1164-FA-2513-D Foundations -Annual 
Conference or Conferences. GCFA 

1165-FA-2515-D Sale, Transfer, Lease or 
Mortgage of Annual Conference Property. 
GCFA. 

2063-FA-2515-D Sale of mortgage of real 
property held in trust by Annual Conference 
Board of Trustees. Thomas W. Griffith, CAP. 

154-FA-2517-D District Board of Trustees. 
GCSW + WVA 

1166-FA-2517-D District Parsonages and 
Boards of Trustees. GCFA 

2064-FA-2517-D Sale of real property by 
District Board of Trustees. Thomas W. Grif- 
fith. CAP. 

427-FA-2518-D District Board of Church 
Location and Building. GCRR. 

1167-FA-2518-D Board of Church Location 
and Building. GCFA. 

1652-FA-2518-D District Board of Church 
Location and Building. John C. Kerce, KEN. 

1653-FA-2518-D District Board of Church 
Location and Building. Jim Beal, NAK. 

1168-FA-2519-D Local Church Building 
Sites and Plans. GCFA. 

1169-FA-2520-D Approval of Construction, 
Purchase, or Remodeling Plans for Local Chur- 
ches. GCFA 

1170-FA-2523-D Sale, Transfer, Lease or 
Mortgage of District Property. GCFA. 

1 192-FA-2550-D Requirements-Trustees 
of Church Institutions. GCFA 

279-FA-3000-M Black History Month. 
NIL. 

282-FA-3000-M Plans for New Church Con- 
struction. SIL. 

238-FA-3000-R South Africa Divestment. 
BAL. 

270-FA-3000-R General Minutes. KSW. 



281-FA-3000-R< Preserve Scarritt College 
NAL. 

284-FA-3000-R Limit Budget Increase 
MEM. 

285-FA-3000-R Limit Budget Increase 
SIN, SNJ 

286-FA-3000-R Apportionment Cap. SIL. 

287-FA-3000-R Calculation of Apportion 
ments. SWT. 

288-FA-3000-R Calculation of Apportion 
ments. MEM. 

289-FA-3000-R Apportionment Cap. Wil- 
liam C. Mason, OKL + 6 local churches and 2 
individuals. 

290-FA-3000-R$ Funding Ethnic Minority 
Local Church Concerns Committee. KEN, 
NAL, NGA, SIN. 

291-FA-3000-R Money to Nicaragua. 
Richard M. Locke, Covenant UMC, Evanston, 
Illinois. 

292-FA-3000-R Prorated Pension Supple- 
ment. CNV. 

293-FA-3000-R Refund of Balance of Vested 
Pension Benefits of Former Participants. 
CAP. 

294-FA-3000-R Discontinuance of Dis- 
ability Benefits. SGA, Joint Committee on Dis- 
ability/Board of Pensions. 

295-FA-3000-R$ Ministerial and Pension 
Aid for Oklahoma Indian Miss., Puerto Rico, 
and Rio Grande Conferences. RIO + 
Methodists Associated Representing the Cause, 
of Hispanic Americans. 

296-FA-3000-R$ Temporary Aid for Fund- 
ing of Past Service in Central Conferences. 
MOZ, ZJM. 

297-FA-3000-R$ Pensions for Retired Min- 
isters. CZA, NZA, WZA. 

298-FA-3000-R Investment Election Dead- 
Une. SIN. 

299-FA-3000-R Pension Investment 
Policies. NDK and MNN Board of Pensions. 

300-FA-3000-R Pension Investment 
Policies. CIL. 

301-FA-3000-R Pension Investment 
PoUcies. CNV. 

302-FA-3000-R Pension Investment 
Policies. NIL. 

303-FA-3000-R Pension Investment 
PoUcies. WML 

304-FA-3000-R Militaiy and Government 
Free Special Pension Fund Option. MEM. 

364-FA-3000-R$ Enforcement of Par. 
906.12. Norman Carter, LRK 

890-FA-3000-R No increase in apportion- 
ments and/or askings. NMX. 

926-FA-3000-R South African Investment 
PoUcy. NJY. 

927-FA-3000-R Investment Policy of The 
United Methodist Church. NJY. 

943-FA-3000-R Board of Pensions to Divest 
in South Africa. , ORI. 

972-FA-3000-R$ Plan of Pension for retired 
pastors in Annual Conferences in Africsu CC 
Executive Committee. 

973-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 2. GBPN. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



41 



974-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 4. GBPN. 

975-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 4. GBPN. 

976-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Sections. GBPN. 

977-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 6. GBPN. 

978-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Sections. GBPN. 

979-FA-30O0-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 10. GBPN. 

980-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Supplement One. GBPN. 

981-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 2. CNV. 

982-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan. GBPN. 

983-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 3. GBPN 

984-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 3. CNV. 

986-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 5. GBPN. 

987-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 5. CNV. 

988-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 6. GBPN. 

989-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protection 
Plan Section 7. GBPN. 

990-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 1. GBPN. 

991-FA-3000-R Cumulative BeneHt and 
Pension Fund Section 2. GBPN. 

992-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 3. GBPN. 

993-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 4. GBPN. 

994-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 5. GBPN. 

995-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 6. GBPN. 

996-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 8. GBPN. 

997-FA-3000-R Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Section 10. GBPN. 

998-FA-3000-R Tax-Deferred Annuity Con- 
tributions Program Section 4. GBPN. 

999-FA-3000-R Tax-Deferred Annuity Con- 
tributions Program Section 5. GBPN. 

1000-FA-3000-R Quadrennial Financial 
Statement. GCFA 

1001-FA-3000-R Tax-Deferred Annuity 
Contributions Program Section 7. GBPN. 

1002-FA-3000-R Tax-Deferred Annuity 
Contributions Program Section 8. GBPN. 

10O3-FA-30OO-R Tax-Deferred Annuity 
Contributions Program Section 10. GBPN. 

1004-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 

2. GBPN. 

1005-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 

3. GBPN. 

1006-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 

4. GBPN. 

1007-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 

5. GBPN. 

1008-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 

6. GBPN. 



1009-FA-3000-R StaffPension Plan Section 
8. GBPN. 

10 10-FA-3000-R Staff Pension Plan Section 
10. GBPN. 

1011-FA-3000-R Basic Protection Plan Sec- 
tion 6. GBPN. 

1012-FA-3000-R Basic Pension Plan Sec- 
tion 7. GBPN. 

1024-FA-3000-R Funding the Ministerial 
Pension Plan. Officers, Northridge UMC, 
Springfield, Ohio. 

1234-FA-3000-R The World Service Fund. 
GCFA. 

1235-FA-3000-R Ministerial Education 
Fund. GCFA. 

1236-FA.3000-R Black CoUege Fund. 
GCFA. 

1237-FA-3000-R Episcopal Fund. GCFA 

1238-FA-30O0-R General Administration 
Fund. GCFA. 

1239-FA-3000-R$ Interdenominational 
Cooperation Fund. GCFA. 

1240-FA-3000-R Apportionment For- 
mulas. GCFA. 

1241-FA-3000-R Special Days with Offer- 
ings. GCFA 

1242-FA-3000-R Worid Service Special 
Gifts Fund. GCFA. 

1243-FA-3000-R Directives for the Ad- 
ministration of the General Funds. GCFA. 

1244-FA-3000-R Income from the Board of 
Trustees. GCFA. 

1245-FA-3000-R The Churches' Center for 
Theology and Public Policy. GCFA, GCOM. 

1246-FA-3000-R References from Prior 
General Conferences. GCFA. 

1247-FA-30O0-R Budget of the General 
Council on Finance and Administration. 
GCFA. 

1248-FA-3000-R Disposition of Scarritt 
Graduate School Property. GCFA^ 

1337-FA-3000-R Language in United 
Methodist publications. Administrative Coun- 
cils, or Administrative Boards, 40 local chur- 
ches, in Ohio. 

1347-FA-3000-R Reporting Sunday School 
attendance. J. David Roberts, Oakdale Emory 
UMC, Olney, Maryland. 

1399-FA-3000-R$ Fund to aid farmers. 
Watford Reed, Lincoln Street UMC, Portland, 
Oregon. 

1408-FA-3000-R Strict Enforcement of 
Par. 906.12. Administrative Council, First 
UMC, Bennington, Vermont 

1420-FA-3000-R U.S. tax laws for non- 
profit organizations. , WNC Board of Health 
and Welfare Ministries. 

1423-FA-3000-R Use traditional 

Trinitarian formula in all United Methodist 
pubUcations. Members, Midland Green Valley 
UMC, Midland, Pennsylvania. 

1489-FA-3000-R Disengagement. Ad. 
Council, Trinity UMC, Mt Pleasant + Ad. 
Board, Albright UMC, So. Connellsville, COM, 
Hilltop UMC, Madison + John D. Vamer, 
Grace UMC, Indiana, Pennsylvania. 



1529-FA-3000-R Apply Par. 920 to retired 
pastors in annual conferences in Africa Central 
Conference. BUR. 

1542-FA-3000-R$ Pins for retired pastors. 
/. Melville Wohrley, EOH 

1543-FA-3000-R$ Establish salary founda- 
tions. I. Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

1681-FA-3000-R Apportionment Cap. 
Helen K. Doll, First UMC, Three Rivers, 
Michigan. 

1682-FA-3000-R Keep Scarritt College in 
UMC. AFL. 

1683.FA-3000-R$ Additional funds for 
television telecommunications ministries. 
TTIN Communications Committee. 

1747-FA-30O0-R$ Subsidize price of new 
hymnal. Administrative Boards, Panola 
Charge, Oxford, Mississippi. 

1812-FA-3000-R References to the Trinity 
and Scripture in church pubUcations. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Faith UMC, Arcanum, 
Ohio. 

1813-FA-3000-R$ Television / Telecom- 
munications Fund. WNC Television Ministries 
Committee. 

2354-FA-3000-R Special South Africa-Free 
Fund for Pension Contributions. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 

2408-FA-3000-R Financial askings. DonM. 
Pike, CTX. 

2409-FA-3000-R Waive mandatory pension 
participation for "tentmaker" ministers. Com- 
mission on Church Extension and Revitaliza- 
tion, NWT. 

2410-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protec- 
tion Plan Section 3. Martha L. Mathatas, EOH. 

2411-FA-3000-R Apportionments. Tues- 
day Morning Prayer and Bible Study Group, 
First UMC, Farmington, New Mexico. 

2413-FA-3000-R General Minutes. Nation- 
al United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + NC, 
NE andSE Juris. Town and Country Asso. 

2414-FA-30O0-R$ United Methodist Health 
Insurance. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

2415-FA-3000-R Apportionment Cap. 
Members, Massac UMC, Paducah, Kentucky. 

2416-FA-3000-R Maximum apportion- 
ments assigned to a local church. Members, 7 
local churches, Byesville, East Canton, East 
Sparta, Gallon, Louisville, Mingo Junction, 
Navarre, Ohio. 

2417-FA-3000-R Upper limits on confer- 
ence budget increases. Members, 7 local chur- 
ches, Byesville, East Canton, East Sparta, 
Gallon, Louisville, Mingo Junction, Navarre, 
Ohio. 

2418-FA-3000-R Transmission of funds. 
James Albert Trickett, LSA. 

2419-FA-3000-R United Methodist Affinity 
Ceu-d. YEL Council on Ministries. 

2421-FA-3000-R Extend provisions of Par. 
906. 12. Administrative Council, Antloch UMC, 
Antloch, California. 

2422-FA-3000-R Apportionment formula. 
Arthur R. Kirk, EOH. 



42 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



2423-FA-3000-R Help for pastors' 
widows/widowers. Arthur R. Kirk, EOH. 

2427-FA-3000-R Comprehensive Protec- 
tion Plan Section 3. Donald A. Smith, First 
UMC, Marion, Indiana. 

2428-FA-3000-R External audit James Al- 
bert Trickett, LSA. 

2429-FA-3000-R Ministerial Pension Plan 
Section 3. Gerald A. Beam, Trinity UMC, Wil- 
mette, Illinois. 

243O-FA-30O0-R Opportunity for local 
churches to designate World Service and conf- 
erence benevolerice apportionments. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Lamesa, Texas. 

2431-FA-3000-R Apportionment Cap. 
Samuel T Colvin, Kenova UMC, Kenova, West 
Virginia. 

2432-FA-30O0-R Native American Salaiy 
Support Native American International 
Caucus. 

2531-FA-3000-R Funding the sin of 
homosexuality. Members, Mt. Israel UMC, 
Tunnelton, West Virginia. 

2585-FA-3000-R Alternative ministerial 
support pltm. EOH Renewal Community. 

2645.FA-3000-R Language in United 
Methodist publications. Administrative Coun- 
cil, Pharisburg UMC, Marysville, Ohio. 

269-FA-3000-S$ Study Commission on In- 
vestment Stewardship. CAP, OIL, KSE, KSW, 
NIL, NYK, PNW, RKM, SIN, TRY, WIS, WMI, 
WNY, YEL + 2 organizations. 

283-FA-3000-S Directors and OfTicers 
Liability Insurance. SWT. 

2412-FA-30O0-S$ Study feasibility of 
church-wide medical insursmce program. /. 
Mark Conner, WVA. 

2425-FA-30O0-S$ Study feasibility of 
moving General Board of Global Ministries. 
William D. Turkingtonll, First UMC, Ashland, 
Kentucky. 



Faith and Mission 

1031-FM-OO-D The Mission of The United 
Methodist Church "Grace upon Grace": God's 
Mission and Ours. MUMC. 

1089-FM-OO-D Our Doctrinal Heritage. 
CTTK 

1328-FM-OO-D Use of inclusive language in 
the Church. Administrative Board, UMC, 
Campbell, New York, and members, Ranck's 
UMC, New Holland, Pennsylvania. 

1907-FM-OO-D Articles of Religion. Frank 
K Warden, NTX -^ members, Ward/Sixteenth 
Section UM Charge, El Paso, Ark. 

1966-FM-OO-D Our Doctrinal Heritage. 
Riley B. Case, NIN. 

1090-FM-67-D Our Doctrinal Histoiy. 
CTTK 

1725-FM-67-D Retain three sentences of 
Par. 67. Thomas C. Oden, OKL + 9 local chur- 
ches and 31 other individuals. 

1753-FM-67-D Retain portions of Par. 67. 
Members, First UMC, Gatesville, Texas. 

2093-FM-67-D Retain Par. 67. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 



2281-FM-67-D Retain portions of Par. 67. 
Robert B. Mussman, WOH + Administrative 
Council, Trinity UMC, Byesville, Ohio. 

1091-FM-68-D Our Doctrinal Standards 
and General Rules. CTTK 

1510-FM-68-D Retain portions of Par. 68. 
Marilyn B. Thompson, First UMC, Starkville, 
Mississippi. 

2094-FM-68-D Retain Par. 68. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 

2639-FM-68-D Retain Article I. Members. 
Honey Brook UMC, Honey Brook, Pennsyl 

3-FM-69-D Retain portions of Par. 69, 
PNW. 

1092-FM-69-D Our Theological Task, 
CTTK. 

1294-FM-69-D Primacy of Scripture. Ad- 
ministrative Boards, Armona and Laton UMCs, 
Armona and Laton, California. 

1341-FM-69-D Substitute for Ecumenical 
Commitment Section of CTTK report. GCCU. 

1410-FM-69-D Retain portion of Par. 69. 
Members, First UMC, Pampa, Texas. 

1429-FM-69-D Primacy of Scripture. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Holly Avenue UMC, Pit- 
tsburg, Tennessee. 

1561-FM-69-D Primacy of Scripture. NGA 
LaGrange District ministers, + 34 local chur- 
ches and 2 individuals. 

1605-FM-69-D Doctrinal Statement Ad- 
ministrative Board, McCann's UMC, Jackson, 
Alabama. 

1606-FM-69-D Primacy of Scripture. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Centenary UMC, 
Skowhegan, Maine and members. First UMC, 
Jasper, Texas, and Stanton Heights UMC, Pit- 
tsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

1608-FM-69-D Retain quadrilateral. Linda 
Sue Bailey, CIL + 2 local churches. 

1755-FM-69-D Retain Par. 69. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, + 3 local churches 
and 3 individuals. 

1756-FM-69-D Retain portions of Par. 69. 
Administrative Board, Heidelberg UMC. 
Corydon, Indiana, members. Trinity UMC, At- 
lanta, Georgia, + Marilyn E. Thompson, First 
UMC, Starkville, Mississippi. 

1757-FM-69-D Retain portion of Par. 69. 
United Methodist Women, Charity UMC.Elkin, 
North Carolina. 

1829-FM-69-D Include conclusions of 
Houston Declaration. Annual Church Con- 
ference, Bethel UMC, Sheridan, Montana. 

1830-FM-69-D Our Theological Task. Ad- 
ministrative Board, St. Paul UMC, El Campo, 
Texas. 

1831-FM-69-D Our Theological Task. An- 
nual Church Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs 
Ferry, New York. 

1908-FM-69-D Retain portion of Par. 69. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Montrose, 
Colorado. 

2095-FM-69-DOurTheologicalTask. Riley 
B. Case, NIN. 

2096-FM-69-D Our Theological Task. Paul 
F. Perry, SWT. 



I469-FM-3000-M Support report of CTTK. 
Administrative Board, Unicot UMC, Unicot, 
Tennessee. 

305-FM-3000-R Support New Doctrinal 
Statement LVL. 

306-FM-3000-R Junaluska AfTuTnation of 
Scriptural Christianity. Administrative Coun- 
cil, St. Paul UMC, College, Alaska. 

1029-FM-3O0O-R United Methodist official 
statement of theological teachings. Church 
Conference, First UMC, Atlanta, Texas. 

1059-FM-3000-R Juridical Authority. 
Clyde D. Nichols Sr.VIR. 

1060-FM-3000-R Report from the Commis- 
sion on the Mission of The United Methodist 
Church. MUMC. 

1061-FM-3000-R$ Recommendations from 
the Commission on the Mission of The United 
Methodist Church. MUMC. 

1096-FM-3000-R Report of the Committee 
on Our Theological Task. CTTK 

1491-FM-3000-R Principal factors of our 
faith. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Lafayette, Louisiana. 

1514-FM-3000-R In support of Houston 
Declaration. Administrative Councils or 
Boards, members, in 20 local churches, in 15 
States, + 3 individuals. 

1544-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Members, Christ UMC, Kingston, Rhode Is- 
land. 

1684-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture, 
Administrative Board, First UMC + members, 
Wesley Chapel UMC, Sylacauga, Florida. 

1690-FM-3000-R Retain spiritual primacy. 
Sunday School Class, First UMC, Clyde, Texas. 

1691-FM-3000-R Biblical faith and prac 
tices in the Wesleyan spirit. Danny A. Fleming, 
Eula UMC, Eula, Texas. 

1694-FM-30O0-R Discontinue use of term 
"Act of God". Arthur R. Kirk, EOH + 2 local 
churches. 

1748-FM-3000-R The Trinity. Bobbie N. 
Martin, TEX, + 14 local churches. 

1749-FM-30O0-R Changing words in Dis- 
cipline. Virginia Wilson, St Paul UMC, 
Millers, Maryland. 

1814-FM-3000-R Declare Authorized King 
James Version of the Holy Bible as the inerrant 
Word. Maurice E. Graham, Chalybeate UMC, 
Hillsboro Circuit, Alabama. 

1815-FM-3000-R Doctrinal Guidelines. 
Members, First UMC, Corry, Pennsylvania. 

1817-FM-30O0-RAgainst Houston Declara- 
tion. Linda Sue Bailey, CIL. 

2433-FM-3000-R$ Church-wide Study of 
Our Theological Task and the Mission of The 
United Methodist Church. National United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, + NC and NE 
Juris. Town and Country Associations. 

2434-FM-3000-R Approve CTTK report 
Members, West Chelmsford UMC, West 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

2435-FM-3000-R Accept CTTK report. Ad- 
ministrative Councils, Thurman and Vega 
UMCs, Thurman, Ohio + 3 individuals. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



43 



2436-FM-3000-R$ Teaching basic facts of 
the Christian life. Veda Rahkonen, UMC, Hel 
sinki, Finland. 

2437-FM-30O0-R Evangelism. Tasker N. 
Rodman, UMC, Leachville, Arkansas. 

2501-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture 
Sunday School classes. Saint Paul UMC, 
Abilene, Texas. 

2532-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture 
Willian\ E. Thielking, SNJ. 

2533-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture 
Members, First UMCs, Pampa and Morton, 
Texas. 

2534-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, Spring Woods UMC, 
Houston, Texas. 

2535-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture 
Maxine Manering, Ashford UMC, Houston 
Texas. 

2536-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. Es- 
tellR. Casebier, LVL. 

2537-FM-30O0-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, Killean UMC, Tallahas- 
see, Florida. 

2538-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, Will Rogers UMC, 
T^lsa, Oklahoma. 

2539-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, UMC, Mullens, West 
Virginia. 

2540-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, Opelika, 
Alabama. 

2541-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. J. 
Cecil Williamson, NMS. 

2542-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Administrative Board, Cairo UMC, Cairo, 
Ohio. 

2543-FM-3000-R Primacy of Scripture. 
Members, Liverpool UMC, Liverpool, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

307-FM-3000-S$ Local Church Studies of 
Theological Task and Mission of the Church. 
NTX, SWT. 

570-FM-3000-S$ Local Church Study of 
Doctrinal Standards and Theological Task. 
GCCU. 

1490-FM-3000-S$ Study on how to involve 
entire church in communicating Christian 
beliefs. Donald R. Rodgers, North Bethesda 
UMC, Bethesda, Maryland 

1692-FM-3000-S$ Church-wide local 
church study on the general ministry of all 
Christian believers. Southeastern Jurisdiction 
Association, Conference Boards of Diaconal 
Ministry. 



General Administration 

2201-GA-O-C Preamble to the Constitution. 
Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

1601-GA-4-C Inclusiveness of the church. 
Dott Clarke Koch, New Horizon UMC, Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida. 

1603-OA-16-C Defme Doctrine. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort 
Worth, Texas. 



2210-GA-64-C Amend Par. 64. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

1762-GA-271-D Sanctity of Human Life 
Sunday. Cecil F McKee, TEX. 

2650-GA-271-D Special Sundays. Native 
American International Caucus. 

48-GA-272-D Human Relations Day. KSW. 

49-GA-272-D Police-Community Relations 
Program. CPA. 

50-GA-272-D World Communion Offering. 
NCA. 

271-GA-272-D United Methodist Student 
Day HOL. 

308-GA-272-D World Order Sunday. WOH 
Department of Peace and World Order. 

503-GA-272-D Peace with Justice Sunday. 
GBCS. 

651-GA-272-D Human Relations Day. 
EOH Steubenville DOOM. 

1105-GA-272-D Human Relations Day. 
GCOM. 

1106-GA-272-D United Methodist Student 
Day GCFA,GCOM. 

1107-GA-272-D Peace with Justice Sunday. 
GCFA, GCOM. 

1 129-GA-272-D Special Sundays with Offer- 
ings. GCFA. 

1409-GA-272-D World Order Sunday. FLA 
Work Area on Church and Society. 

1530-GA-272-D World Order Sunday BAL 
Board of Church and Society. 

1630-GA-272-D Rural Life Sunday Wil- 
liam E. Ballard, IWA and H. Glenn Biddle, 
WOH, + 7 organizations and 2 local churches. 

2651-GA-272-D Native American Aware- 
ness Sunday. Native American International 
Caucus. 

51-GA-273-D Three Special Sundays. DET, 
KSW. 

52-GA-273-D Rogation Sunday. FLA. 

53-GA-273-D Student Recognition Day. 
HOL. 

163-GA-273-D Laity Sunday NIN. 

704-GA-273-D Heritage Sunday GCAH. 

705-GA-273-D Laity Sunday. GBOD. 

1097-GA-273-D Rural Life Sunday DET, 
KSW. 

1108-GA-273-D Laity Sunday GCOM. 

1582-GA-628-D Jurisdictional Administra- 
tive Council. Southeastern Jurisdictional Con- 
ference Structure, Study Committee. 

S11-GA-800-D Pohcies Relative to Socially 
Responsible Investments. GBCS. 

1454-GA-801-D Definition of laypersons 
and clergy. Lonnie D. Brooks, Christ UMC, 
Sugar Land, Texas. 

909-GA-802-D Approval of right of petition. 
Administrative Board, Faith UMC, Woodward, 
Oklahoma. 

910-GA-802-D Process for evaluating 
general program agencies. GCFA, GCOM. 

1038-GA-802-D Evaluation of general agen- 
cies. SONY. 

2028-GA-802-D Amenability and Accoun- 
tability. Bruce Birch, BAL. 

2029-GA-802-D Accountability. Dwight E. 
Giles Sr., WYO. 



2030-GA-802-D Accountability. Ad- 

ministrative Board, First UMC, Montrose, 
Colorado. 

134-GA-803-D Ongoing Priority. EOH. 

607-GA-803-D Specialized Unit. GBCS. 

1114-GA-803-D Defmitions of Study Com- 
mittee. GCFA, GCOM. 

1141-GA-803-D Defmition of Theme. 
GCOM. 

1687-GA-803-D General Board. J. Robert 
Martin, WNC. 

1874-GA-803-D Alternative Mission Agen- 
cy. Annual Church Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, 
Dobbs Ferry, New York. 

2031-GA-803-D Defmitions, Structures and 
Titles. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Hinckley, Illinois, andRobert W. Baumgardner, 
First UMC, Brownfield, Texas. 

911-GA-804-D Annual Reports of General 
Agencies. GCFA, GCOM. 

135-GA-805-D General Agency Member- 
ship. MEM. 

410-GA-805-D Adequate Representation, 
GCRR. 

508-GA-805-D Additional Members 
GBCS. 

509-GA-805-D Additional Members, 
GBCS. 

545-GA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. GCCU. 

584-GA-805-D Membership on general 
program boards. GBGM. 

803-GA-805-D Nominations by Annual 
Conferences. GCSW. 

804-GA-805-D General Program Board 
Membership. GBOD. 

900-GA-805-D General Program Board 
Membership. Western Jurisdictional Con- 
ference. 

1115-GA-805-D General Agency Members 
from Other Denominations. GCFA, GCOM. 

1482-GA-805-D Nominations for general 
agency membership. Wendell A. Meggs, TEN. 

1642-GA-805-D Membership of agencies. 
Council on Ministries, First UMC, Abilene, 
Texas. 

1643-GA-805-D General Program Board 
Membership. AFL. 

1786-GA-805-D Reduce size of general 
program boards. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1787-GA-805-D Representation from an- 
nual conferences in Central Conferences. 
LeonardD. SluU, HydePark Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1788-GA-805-D Amend Par. 805.2(a). 
LeonardD. SluU, HydePark UMC, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

2032-OA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. Betty A. Jackson Hodges, St. Paul UMC, 
Decatur, Georgia. 

2033-GA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. Joseph R. Graham, WOH. 

2034-OA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. Gregory D. Stover, WOH. 

2182-GA-805-D Nominations by annual 
conferences. David L. Severe, OKL. 



44 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



2183-GA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. Barbara and Erroll Wendland, First 
UMC, Temple, Texas. 

2256-GA-80S-D General agency member- 
ship. Central Conference of Northern Europe. 

2257-GA-805-D General agency member- 
ship. EarlR. Carter, NAK-y Northeastern and 
Western, Secretaries of Jurisdictional Conferen- 
ces. 

2647-CiA-805-D Membership on general 
agencies. Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal, Inc. 

546-GA-808-D OfTicers of program boards. 
GCCU. 

1789-GA-808-D$ Frequency of meetings. 
Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community 
UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

263-GA-8 10-D Conference Agency Member- 
ship. CAP. 

309-GA-8X0-D Agency Membership 
Residence Requirements. Council on Mini- 
stries, Christ UMC, Sugar Land, Texas. 

1372-GA-810-D Residence of general agen- 
cy members. John J. Shaffer, CIL. 

1790-GA-810-D Change maximum period 
for general agency membership from two to 
three quadrennia. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2258-GA-810-D Members of general agen- 
cies. Millie Hilts, California Heights UMC, 
Long Beach, California. 

510-GA-813-D Election of General 
Secretaries. GBCS. 

547-GA-813-D Election of general 
secretary. GCCU. 

805-GA-813-D Election of general 
secretaries. GCSW. 

1415-GA-813-D Retain Par. 813. LRK 
HopeDistrict Council on Ministries, + Lakeside 
UMC, Lake Village, Arkansas. 

2649-GA-813-D Election of general 
secretaries. Robert I. Phelps, YEL. 

136-GA-814-D Provisions Pertaining to 
Staff. MEM, NMS. 

548-GA-814-D Elected staff of general agen- 
cies. GCCU. 

585-GA-814-D General agency staff tenure. 
GCFA, GCCU. 

870-GA-814-D Twelve-Year Employment 
Rule. UCOM. 

962-GA-814-D Staff Retirement. GBPN 

1116-GA-814-D Tenure of elected general 
agency staff. GCOM. 

1414-GA-814-D Eligibility of general agen- 
cy staff for election as a General Conference 
delegate. LRK Hope District Council on Mini- 
stries, + Lakeside UMC, Lakeville, Arkansas. 

1416-GA-814-D Tenure of elected staff. Ad- 
ministrative Bcxird, Lakeside UMC, Lake Vil- 
lage, Arkansas. 

1588-GA-814-D Requirements for general 
agency clergy staff. J. Robert Martin, WNC, + 
Council on Ministries, First UMC, Abilene, 
Texas. 

1735-GA-814-D Qualifications for general 
agency staff. Robert D. Snyder, EOH, Gregory 
D. Stover, WOH, Michael W. Walker, NTX + 2 
local churches. 



2184-GA-814-D Qualifications for general 
agency clergy staff. Council on Ministries, 
Lacon UMC, Lacon, Illinois, and Robert W. 
Baumgardner, First UMC, Brownfield, Texas. 

1117-GA-816-D Record and role of or- 
ganizations supported by membership or funds. 
GCFA, GCOM. 

806-GA-820-D Closed session. GBHM. 

912-GA-823-D Legal Status of The United 
Methodist Church. GCFA. 

808-GA-914-D The Advance. GCSW. 

913-GA-914.D The Advance. GCFA, 
GCOM. 

2187-GA-914-D The Advance. Carl W. 
Judy, WNC. 

1121-GA-916-D General Church Special- 
Day Offerings. GCFA, GCOM. 

1485-GA-1005-D$ Objectives of General 
Council on Ministries. Wendell A. Meggs, TEN. 

513-GA-1006-D Election of General 
Secretaries. GBCS, GCSW. 

549-GA-1006-D Responsibilities of General 
CouncU on Ministries. GCCU. 

1040-GA-1006-D Responsibilities of 
General Council on Ministries. MUMC. 

1041-GA-1006-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

1122-GA-1006-D Responsibilities. GCOM. 

1123-GA-1006-D Responsibilities. GCOM. 

1486-GA-1006-D Responsibilities of 
General Council on Ministries. Wendell A. 
Meggs, TEN. 

2042-GA-1006-D Responsibilities of 
General Council on Ministries. Robert I. 
Phelps, YEL. 

2188-GA-1006-D Responsibilities of 
General Council on Ministries. National 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Legislative 
and Executive Committees. 

810-GA-1007-D The Advance. GCSW. 

1124-GA-1007-D Membership of the 
General Council on Ministries. GCOM. 

1125-GA-1007-D World Services Special 
Gifts Committee. GCOM. 

2262-GA-1007-D Membership of General 
Council on Ministries. Victor Goldschmidt, St 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiancu 

2050-GA-1414-D Responsibilities of Na- 
tional Division. William E. Ballard, IWA + NC, 
NE, SE Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. 
+ UM Appalachian Dev. Com. 

311-GA-3000-M The Advance. Perry S. 
Miller, WNC. 

2454-GA-2000-R Ordained, Diaconal and 
Commissioned Ministry Sunday. IWA Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. 

312-GA-3000-R Africa Church Growth and 
Development. 31 Annual Conferences, EOH 
BGM, and CC Executive Committee. 

313-GA-3000-R No Missional Priority. 
VZR. 

314-GA-3000-R$ Incorporation of the Eth- 
nic Minority Local Church Missional Priority. 
GCRR, GCSW, BAL, CAP, CIL, DET, EOH, 
IWA, KEN, NTX, NWT + MARCHA. 

315-GA-3000-R$ Ethnic Minority Local 
Church Priority. DSW. 



316-GA-3000-R$ Permanent Ethnic 
Minority Local Church Priority. NJY, NYK, 
WVA. 

317-GA-3000-R$ Special Funding of Mis- 
sional Priority. RIO. 

318-GA-3000-R Missional Priority: Peace 
with Justice. CIL, DSW, NCA, WPA. 

319-GA-3000-R$ Missional Priority: Peace 
with Justice. NIL. 

320-GA-3000-R Missional Priority Peace 
with Justice. EOH. 

321-GA-3000-R Missional Priority Peace 
with Justice. CAP. 

322-GA-3000-R$ Missional Priority. Peace 
with Justice. SNE. 

323-GA-3000-R$ Missional Priority: Peace 
with Justice. WIS. 

324-GA-3000-R Missional Priority Church 
Growth/Catch the Spirit. RKM. 

325-GA-3000-R$ Missional Priority: Evan- 
gelism. MOW. 

326-GA-3000-R Missional Priority: Rural 
Decline in America. IWA. 

327-GA-3000-R$ Missional Priority: South 
Africa. PNW. 

328-GA-3000-R Quadrennial Emphasis: 
Empowerment of the Laity. SIN. 

329-GA-3000-R Missional Priority The 
Electronic Mission Field. AFL. 

330-GA-3000-R Prison Ministry. NMS, 
WNC. 

331-GA-3000-R Prison Ministry. NCA 

333-GA-3000-R Older Adult Ministries. 
WVA. 

334-GA-3000-R$ Church's Role in Care for 
Older Adults. KSE. 

335-GA-3000-R$ Advisory Coordinating 
Committee for Older Adult Ministries. CNV, 
IWA, NGA, NJY and PEN COM. 

336-GA-3000-R$ Advisory Committee for 
Older Adult Ministries. WNC. 

337-GA-3000-R$ Permanent Organization 
for Older Adult Ministries. PAW. 

338-GA-3000-R$ Committee on Ministry to 
Older Adulte. KEN. 

340-GA-3000-R$ Consultation on Deaf 
Ministry. AKM, BAL + 1 FLA local church. 

342-GA-3000-R Inclusive Language. WPA. 

343-GA-3000-R Inclusive Language. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Leavenworth, 
Kansas. 

344-GA-3000-R Inclusive Language. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Bethel UMC, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

346-GA-3000-R The Term "Minority". 
DET. 

347-GA-3000-R Book of Resolutions. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Si Paul UMC, College, 
Alaska 

348-GA-3000-R 1992: Year of Rediscovery. 
RIO. 

499-GA-3000-R Elimination of Racism in 
The United Methodist Church. GCRR. 

625-GA-30OO-R$ Africa Church Growth 
and Development. GBGM. 

649-GA-3000-R Older Adult Ministries. 
VZR Senior Adult Assembly. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



45 



652-GA-3000-R$ Recommendations on 
Older Adult Ministries. OAMN. 

659-GA-3000-R$ Ethnic Minority Local 
Church Emphasis. GBOD. 

898-OA-3000-R Proper Use of Name: The 
United Methodist Church. UCOM. 

944-GA-3000-R Quadrennial Emphasis on 
Family Life. IWA Council on Family Mini- 
stries. 

945-GA-3000-R Rural Crisis Quadrennial 
Emphasis. ORI. 

946-GA-3000-R Terminology for presiding 
officers. ORI. 

1062-GA-3000-R Developing and 

Strengthening the Ethnic Minority Local 
Church: for Witness and Mission. MPCC. 

1063-GA-3000-R$ Recommendations from 
the Missional Priority Coordinating Commit- 
tee. MPCC. 

1064-GA-3000-R Report of the Advisory 
Committee on Stewardship. ACST. 

1065-GA-3000-R$ Recommendations from 
the Advisory Committee on Stewardship. 
ACST. 

1066-GA-3000-R Report from the Council 
of Bishops Committee to Coordinate the Goal 
to Increase Membership. GIMM. 

1194-GA-3000-R Report of the Task Force 
on Older Adult Ministries. OAMN. 

1195-GA-3000-R$ Theme for the 1989- 
1992 Quadrermium: "Celebrate God's Grace: 
Witness for Jesus Christ". GCOM. 

1196-GA-3000-R Report on the Study of the 
Connectional Principle. GCOM. 

1197-GA-3000-R The World Service Special 
Gifts Program. GCOM. 

1198-GA-3000-R Report on New Church 
Development Apportionment. GCOM. 

1199-GA-3000-R Report on Developing 
Congregations for Deaf Ministry. GCOM. 

1201-GA-3000-R Report on Biblical and 
Theological Language. GCOM. 

1202-GA-3000-R Report on Young Adult 
Members of the General Agencies. GCOM. 

1203-GA-3000-R Resolutions on Special 
Days. GCOM. 

1204-GA-3000-R Report on Task Force on 
Hispemic Language Resources. GCOM. 

1205-GA-3000-R Report on Prison Mini- 
stries/Prison Reform. GCFA. 

I206-GA-3000-R Report on the Data Bank. 
GCOM. 

1207-GA-3000-R Report on Affiliate 
Groups. GCOM. 

1208-GA-3000-R Report on Interagency 
Task Forces and Groups. GCOM. 

1209-GA-3000-R Report on Joint Panel on 
International Affairs. GCOM. 

1210-GA-3000-R Report on Telecom- 
munications. GCOM. 

1211-GA-3000-R$ Recommendation to the 
GCFA regarding the needs of the general 
program agencies for 1989-1992. GCOM. 

1212-GA-30O0-R$ Recommendation to 
GCFA regarding the amount of the World Ser- 
vice Fund Allocations. GCOM. 

1213-GA-3000-R Requests and recommen- 
dations to the general agencies. GCOM. 



1214-GA-3000-R Report on the Develop- 
ment of the Recommendation for a Theme for 
the Denomination. GCOM. 

1215-GA-3000-R Report on the evaluation 
of general program agencies, UMCOM and 
GCAH. GCOM. 

1216-GA-3000-R Report on the Evaluation 
of the General Council on Ministries. GCOM. 

12 17-GA-3000-R Report on the Advance for 
Christ and His Church. GCOM. 

12 18-GA-3000-R Report on the Work of the 
Interagency Task Force on Legislation. 
GCOM. 

1219-GA-3000-R Report on Grants from 
the World Service Contingency Fund, 1985- 
1989. GCOM. 

1220-GA-30O0-R Report on the Status of 
Native American Ministries within The United 
Methodist Church. GCOM. 

1221-GA-3000-R Report on Program and 
Funding Patterns. GCOM. 

1222-GA-3000-R Report on The Future 
That Can Be. GCOM. 

1223-GA-3000-R Report on the Baltimore 
Declaration. GCOM. 

1224-GA-3000-R Report on the Bicenten- 
nial Church Growth Fund. GCOM. 

1225-GA-3000-R Report on Local Church 
Structure. GCOM. 

1226-GA-3000-R Report on Ministry to 
Single Adults. GCOM. 

1227-GA-3000-R Report on general agency 
headquarters location. GCFA, GCOM. 

1228-GA-3000-R Report on the Training 
Events for District Superintendents and Con- 
ference Council Directors. GCOM. 

1229-GA-3000-R Report on Goal to In- 
creeise Membership. GCOM. 

1230-GA-3000-R Report on referral of the 
Episcopal and Laity Addresses for Study and 
Appropriate Action. GCOM. 

1231-GA-3000-R Report relating to follow 
up to action on 1984 Infant Formula Task 
Force Report. GCOM. 

1232-GA-3000-R Report on involvement of 
ethnic minority persons in church leadership. 
GCOM. 

1233-GA-3000-R Report on policy for copy- 
ing printed materials. GBGM. 

1249-GA-3000-R Quadrennial Report. 
GCOM. 

1252-GA-3000-R National Day of Prayer. 
Howard C. Neefe, Mount Tabor UMC, East 
Canton, Ohio. 

1254-GA-3000-R Restrict officers' political 
activism. W. M. Dallas, Jr., First UMC, 
Thomaslon, Georgia. 

1256-GA-3000-R$ Interagency Task Force 
on AIDS Ministries. , NIL Council on Mini- 
stries. 

1279-GA-3000-R The Rural Crisis. WNY. 

1327-GA-3000-R Inclusive Language. 
Members, UMC, Ponce, Nebraska. 

1339-GA-3000-R$ Deaf Ministty. Charge 
Conference, First UMC, Ormond Beach, 
Florida. 

1340-GA-3000-R Withdraw and terminate 
schismatic proposals. Ad. Boards, First UMC, 



Ashland, Kentucky and UMC, Malta, Ohio, and 
Ad. Council, Port St John UMC, Cocoa, 
Florida, + 2 individuals. 

1355-GA-3000-R* Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries. NEB. 

1389-GA-3000-R Accountability. Watford 
Reed, Lincoln Street UMC, Portland, Oregon. 

1392-GA-3000-R$ In support of report of 
OAMN. Members, First UMC, Westfield, New 
Jersey. 

1404-GA-3000-R$ Adopt and implement 
OAMN report. Adult Sunday School Class, 
Concord -St Andrew's UMC, Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

1470-GA-3000-R Missional Priority: Rural 
Crisis. YEL + 4 organizations and 1 local 
church. 

1472-GA-3000-R Enforcement of Par. 610. 
Administrative Council, St Mark's UMC, Mar- 
shall, Texas. 

1505-GA-3000-R Qualifications for mem- 
bers of general agencies. Carl Fick, Westbury 
UMC, Houston, Texas. 

1506-GA-3000-R Voting on issues by local 
churches. Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, 
Asheville, North Carolina. 

1562-GA-3000-R$ Establish Interagency 
Task Force on AIDS Ministries. DSW Council 
on Ministries. 

1695-GA-3000-R Reduce politicalization of 
the church. Builders Sunday School Class, 
First UMC, Sullivan, Illinois. 

1697-GA-3000-R$ Task Force on 
strengthening the ministry and witness to 
churches of small membership. H. Glenn Bid- 
die, WOH + 6 organizations. 

1698-GA-3000-R Major Quadrennial Em- 
phasis on Family Life. , VIR andBAL Council 
of Family Ministry. 

1750-GA-3000-R Inclusive language. Tas- 
ker N. Rodman, UMC, Leechville, Arkansas. 

1818-GA-3000-R Missional Priority. Peace 
with Justice. Methodists United for Peace with 
Justice, Washington, DC. 

1819-GA-3000-R Abolish quota system for 
general agency membership. Church Con- 
ference, First UMC, Plainview, Texas. 

1820-GA-3000-R Censure agencies who 
make recommendations regarding 

homosexuaUty. Church Conference, First 
UMC, Plainview, Texas. 

2439-GA-3000-R$ Review personnel 
policies of general agencies. National UM 
Rural Fellowship + NC and NE, Town and 
Country Associations and 1 individual. 

2440-GA-3000-R Restate Goal to Increase 
Membership. Riley B. Case, NIN + 9 other in- 
dividuals. 

2441-GA-3000-R Special Offerings. LeonL. 
Wagnon III, SCA. 

2442-GA-3000-R Missional Priority Evan- 
gelism and Church Growth. TEN. 

2443-GA-3000-R Highest priority to 
Church Growth and Evangelical Outreach. 
Administrative Board, Carter Memorial UMC, 
Needham Heights, Massachusetts. 

2444-GA-3000-R Consider lay input. Tas- 
ker N. Rodman, UMC, Leachville, Arkansas. 



46 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



2445-GA-30O0-R Inclusive Language. Sun- 
day School Class 'Tor Women", Aldersgate 
UMC, College Station, Texas. 

2446-GA-3000-R Human Relations Day Of- 
fering. Black Methodists for Church Renewal, 
Inc. 

2447-GA-3000-R Missional Priority: Evan- 
gelism. Administrative Council, Williams 
Center Asbury UMC, Bryan, Ohio. 

2448-GA-3000-R Missional Priority: The 
Family. Members, West Chelmsford UMC, West 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

2450-GA-30OO-R$ Deaf Ministry. Mem- 
bers, Washington UMC for the Deaf, Takoma 
Park, Maryland. 

2451-GA-3000-R Deaf Ministry. United 
Methodist Congress of the Deaf 

2452-GA-3000-R Advisory Coordinating 
Committee on Older Adult Ministries. TEN. 

2453-GA-3000-R Incorporation of the Eth- 
nic Minority Local Church. Black Methodists 
for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2455-GA-3000-R$ Ethnic Minority Church 
Grants. CNV Council on Ministries. 

2456-GA-3000-R A New Beginning. 
Methodists Associated, Representing the Cause 
of Hispanic Americans. 

2457-GA-30O0-R National Comprehensive 
Plan for Hispanic Ministry. Methodists As- 
sociated, Representing the Cause of Hispanic 
Americans. 

2458-GA-3000-R$ Task Force on AIDS. 
MNE Council on Ministries. 

2459-GA-3000-R Africa Church Growth 
and Development. Black Methodists for 
Church Renewal, Inc. 

2460-GA-3000-R Accessibility guidelines 
for meeting facilities. MOE Committee on Min- 
istry to the Disabled. 

2461-GA-3000-R A Tithing Church. CAP 
Cabinet + 2 other individuals. 

2464-GA-3000-R Disability Awareness Sun- 
iey. OKL Board of Health and Welfare Mini- 
stries. 

2465-GA-3000-R In support of OAMN 
report TEN Council on Older Adult Mini- 
stries. 

2466-GA-3000-R World Order Sunday. 
Peace with Justice Committee, Asbury UMC, 
Prairie Village, Kansas. 

2467-GA-3000-R Native American staff for 
general agencies. Native American Internation- 
al Caucus. 

2469-GA-3000-R Funding for Community 
Developers. NAK Commission on Religion and 
Race. 

2470-GA-3000-R$ Inclusion of Ethnic 
Minority Concerns on a Continuing Basis. Na- 
tional United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 3 
Town and Country Associations. 

2654-GA-30O0-R Incorporate heart of 
present missional priority. Native American In- 
ternational Caucus. 

332-GA-3000-S$ Strengthening Small 
Membership Churches. KEN, MEM. NMS. 

339-GA-3000-S$ Commission to Study 
Older Adult Ministries. ,RIO. 



341-OA-3000-S$ Task Force on Gay/Les- 
bian Issues. CNV. 

638-GA-3000-S$ Ministries in Social Con- 
flict. GBCS. 

1200-GA-30O0-S$ Report on Book of 
Resolutions. GCOM. 

1271-GA-3000-S$ System of Voting Ac- 
countability. Calvin B. Johnson, VIR. 

1821-GA-3000-S$ Study jurisdictional 
structure. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2276-GA-3000-S$ Task Force to Study In- 
clusiveness. Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew 
UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

2438-GA-3000-S$ Study of church struc- 
ture. Men's Fellowship, Asbury UMC, El Paso, 
Texas. 

2449-GA-3000-S$ Study Commission to 
revise Constitution and general organization of 
United Methodist Church. Donald L. Smith, 
First UMC, Marion, Indiana. 



Global Ministries 

578-GM-631-D Jurisdictional Association 
of Deaconesses/Home Missionaries. GBGM. 

132-GM-700-D District Board of Global 
Ministries. LSA. 

273-GM-730-D United Methodist Associa- 
tion of Health and Welfare Ministries. NAK 

581-GM-730-D Conference Board of Global 
Ministries. GBGM. 

1369-GM-730-D Membership of Conference 
Board of Global Ministries. HOL United 
Methodist Women Executive Committee. 

1370-GM-730-D Short-Term Volunteers. 
North Central Jurisdiction, Intersharing Board 
ofDirectors. 

1733-GM-730-D Membership of Conference 
Board of Global Ministries. Pauline Niles, 
Green Trails UMC, Chesterfield, Missouri. 

1778-GM-730-D Optional Conference 
Board of Global Ministries. Barrett Renfro, 
SWT. 

2019-GM-730-D Conference Board of 
Global Ministries. North Central Jurisdiction 
Urban Network. 

2393-GM-730-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Board of Global Ministries. AFL Board 
of Health and Welfare Ministries. 

144-GM-1400-D Purpose of the General 
Board of Global Ministries. DET, HOL, SGA, 
SIL + 73 local churches, and 1 7 individuals. 

888-GM-1400-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. NMX. 

2046-GM-1400-D Purpose of General 
Board of Global Ministries. Administrative 
Board, Washington Pike UMC, Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee. 

143-GM-1401-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. DET, HOL, SGA, SIL + 86 local 
churches, and 21 individuals. 

586-GM-1401-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. GBGM. 

887-GM-1401-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. NMX. 



1344-GM-1401-D Muster out the General 
Board of Global Ministries. Frank M. Smith, 
Jr., First UMC, Arlington, Texas. 

2045-GM-1401-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. Administrative Board, Washington 
Pike UMC, Knoxville, Tennessee. 

830-GM-1402-D General Board of Global 
Ministries. GCSW. 

1050-GM- 1402-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

1335-GM-1402-D Amend Par. 1402. Frank 
M. Smith Jr., First UMC, Arlington, Texas. 

1455-GM-1402-D Retain Par. 1402.6. AFL 
United Methodist Women Executive Committee, 
+ 2 district UMW and 4 local churches. 

1645-GM-1402-D$ Offices of Town and 
Country and Urban Ministries. William E. 
Ballard, IWA and H. Glenn Biddle, WOH, + 
NE and SE Juris. Town and Country Associa- 
tions. 

2044-GM-1402-D Responsibilities of 
General Board of Global Ministries. Betty A. 
Jackson Hodges, St Paul UMC, Decatur, Geor- 
gia. 

2191-GM-1402-D Responsibilities of 
General Board of Global Ministries. National 
United Methodist R ural Fellowship, Legislative 
and Executive Committees. 

2264-GM-1402-D Inclusiveness. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

587-GM-1403-D Objectives of General 
Board of Global Ministries. GBGM. 

1374-GM-1403-D Ratio of missionaries to 
staff. Church Conference, Paradise Hills UMC, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

2047-GM-1403-D Replace Par. 1403. Ad 
ministrative Board, Washington Pike UMC, 
Knoxville, Tennessee. 

2265-GM-1403-D Relationship with chur 
ches outside the U.S.A. Victor Goldschmidt, St 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

2048-GM-1406-D Laity Division. Betty A 
Jackson Hodges, St Paul UMC, Decatur, Geor- 
gia. 

145-GM-1410-D Missionary/Staff Ratio. 
SGA 

527-GM-1410-D Ratio of Missionaries to 
Staff. William C. Mason, OKL + 49 local 
groups and 22 individuals. 

1646-GM-1410-D Addition to Par. 1410.3. 
Administrative Board, Wilmore UMC, Wil- 
more, Kentucky. 

2266-GM-1410-D Inclusiveness. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

146-GM-1411-D Financial Affairs of the 
General Board of Global Ministries. SGA + 99 
local groups and 22 individuals. 

1375-GM-1411-D Financial Affairs of the 
General Board of Global Ministries. Church 
Conference, Paradise Hills UMC, Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. 

1794-GM-1412-D Representation from an- 
nual conferences in Central Conferences. 
Leonardo. SluU, HydePark Community UMC, 
CincinruUi, Ohio. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



47 



2267-GM-1412-D Amend Par. 1412.6. 
Central Conference of Northern Europe. 

588-GM-1413-D Purpose of National 
Division. GBGM. 

S89-GM-1414-D Responsibilities of Nation- 
al Division. GBGM. 

2049-GM-1414-D Native American mini- 
stries. Native American International Caucus. 

2192-GM-1414-D Responsibilities of Na- 
tional Division. National United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, Legislative and Executive 
Committees. 

2643-GM-1414-D Responsibilities of Na- 
tional Division. National United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship. 

590-GM-1415-D Authority and Organiza- 
tion of National Division. GBGM. 

2193-GM-1415-D Role of National Division. 
National United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
Legislative and Executive Committees. 

1795-GM-1416-D Optional Executive Com- 
mittee. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2195-GM-1416-D National Program 
Division. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

591-GM-1418-D Office of Deaconess. 
GBGM. 

1647-GM-1418-D Retain Office of Deaco- 
ness. WVA deaconesses. 

592-GM-1419-D Committee on Deaconess. 
GBGM. 

593-GM-1420-D Responsibilities of the 
Committee on Deaconess and Home Mission- 
aiy Service. GBGM. 

594-GM-1421-D The Office of Deaconess 
and Home Missionary Service. GBGM. 

2268-GM-1423-D Traditional mission. Vic- 
tor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

1796-GM-1425-D Optional Executive Com- 
mittee. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1797-GM-1425-D Membership of Women's 
Division. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1798-GM-1429-D Election of women mem- 
bers on General Board of Global Ministries. 
Leonardo. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

416-GM-1431-D Sovereign Indian Nations. 
GCRR. 

2051-GM-1431-D Purpose of World 
Division. Native American International 
Caucus. 

417-GM-1432-D Sovereign Indian Nations. 
GCRR. 

2052-GM-1432-D Responsibilities of World 
Division. Native American International 
Caucus. 

2053-GM-1433-D Authority of General 
Board of Global Ministries. Native American 
International Caucus. 

695-GM-1438-D Administration of New 
Commitments. GBGM. 



2064-OM-1438-D Administration of new 
commitments. Native American International 
Caucus. 

278-OM-1443-D Relationship with Health 
and Welfare Ministries. NAK 

596-GM-1443-D Relationship with the 
United Methodist Association of Health and 
Welfare Ministries. GBGM. 

2640-GM-1443-D Relationship with United 
Methodist Association of Health and WeUare 
Ministries. AFL Board of Health and Welfare 
Ministries. 

274-GM-1449-D United Methodist Associa- 
tion of Health and Welfare Ministries. NAK 

697-GM-1449-D National Association of 
Health and Welfare Ministries. GBGM. 

2641-GM-1449-D National Association of 
Health and Welfare Ministries. AFL Board of 
Health and Welfare Ministries. 

598-GM-1456-D Responsibilities of Mission 
Personnel Resources Department. GBGM. 

2055-GM-1456-D Responsibilities of Mis- 
sion Personnel Resources Department. Native 
American International Caucus. 

599-GM-1461-D Objectives and Respon- 
sibilities of the United Methodist Committee 
on Relief GBGM. 

600-GM-1466-D Disaster Response Coor- 
dinator. GBGM. 

350-GM-3000-R Dialogue between General 
Board of Global Ministries and Mission Society. 
FLA, KEN, NGA, NMX, SIL + MSS local 
church. 

351-OM-3000-R New Initiative on Evan- 
gelism and Mission. SGA. 

352-GM-3000-R United Methodist Develop- 
ment Fund. SIL. 

353-GM-3000-R$ Ministry to the Homeless 
in America. CIL. 

354-GM-3000-R$ Church and Community 
Workers. WVA. 

1250-GM-3000-R Report on Korean- 
American Mission Structure. GBGM. 

1286-GM-3000-R$ Establish evangeliza- 
tion unit. Administrative Board, Dalraida 
UMC, Montgomery, Alabama. 

1342-GM-3000-R Increase number of mis- 
sioneiries and neurow scope of missionary ef- 
fort. Administrative Council, Wren UMC, 
Wren, and members, UMC, Waldo, Ohio. 

1356-GM-3000-R Dialogue between Gen. 
Board of Global Ministries and the Mission 
Society for United Methodists. Work Area on 
Missions, Central UMC, Meridian, Mississippi. 

1546-GM-3000-R$ Homelessness and 
Poverty. Administrative Council, Westwood 
UMC, Los Angeles, California, + Los Angeles 
District Conf 

1699-GM-3000-R Leadership development 
for women and children. Jean L. Monroe, Beth- 
lehem UMC, Moneta, Virginia 

1700-GM-3000-R Establish evangelization 
unit. AFL. 

1701-GM-3000-R Renewed commitment to 
Christian mission. AFL. 

1702-GM-30OO-R New unit on evangelism. 
AFL. 



1703-GM-3000-R Continue dialogue be- 
tween General Board of Global Ministries and 
Mission Society for United Methodists. Arthur 
R. Kirk and Robert D. Snyder, EOH, + 2 local 
churches. 

1704-GM-3000-R Recognize the Mission 
Society for United Methodists. AFL + 3 local 
churches and 1 individual. 

1705-OM-3000-R$ National Division staff- 
ing for Urban, Town and Country Ministries. 
Willard E. Ballard, IWA and H. Glenn Biddle, 
WOH, + NE Juris. Town and Country Asso. 
Ex. Committee. 

1706-GM-3000-R$ Reinstatement of the 
Office of Town and Country Ministries and the 
Office of Urban Ministries. H. Glenn Biddle, 
WOH + NE and SE Jurisdictional, Town and 
Country Asso. + Nat. UM Rural Fellowship. 

2471-GM-3000-R Appalachian Challenge. 
United Methodist Appalachian Development 
Committee, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

2473-GM-3000-R Give priority to urban 
ministries. George Christie Jr., RKM. 

2474-GM-3000-R Continuation of the 
Southwest Border Committee. Methodists As- 
sociated, Representing the Cause of Hispanic 
Americans. 

2475-GM-3000-R Church and Community 
Workers. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, + NC and SE Juris. Town and 
Country Associations. 

2476-GM-3000-R Do not recognize Mission 
Society for United Methodists. Linda Sue 
Bailey, CIL. 

2477-GM-3000-R Guidelines for developing 
and implementing mission programs. Mem- 
bers, West Chelmsford UMC, West Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts. 

2478-GM-3000-R Missional Challenge of 
Appalachia. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

2480-GM-3000-R$ Alcohol and Drug Abuse 
in Native American Communities. Native 
American International Caucus. 

2481-GM-30OO-R$ Epidemics in Native 
American Communities. Native American In- 
ternational Caucus. 

2482-GM-3000-R$ National Division staff- 
ing for urban, town and country ministries. 
National United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
+ 4 other organizations. 

2472-GM-3999-R Affirmation of the Mis- 
sion Society for United Methodists. United 
Methodist Women, St. Mark's UMC, Raleigh. 
North Carolina 

2479-GM-3000-S$ Indian lands used by The 
United Methodist Church. Native American 
International Caucus. 



Higher Education and 
Chaplaincy 

119-HE-731-D Wesley Foundation Board of 
Directors. IWA. 



48 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



791-HE-731-D Conference Board of Higher 
Education and Campus Ministry. GBHM. 

792-HE-731-D Conference Board of Higher 
Education and Campus Ministry. GBHM. 

1779-HE-731-D Optional Conference Board 
of Higher Education Eind Ministry. Barrett 
Renfro, SWT. 

423-HE-1500-D Schools of Theology. 
GCRR and Methodists Associated Representing 
the, Cause of Hispanic Americans. 

831-HE-1504-D Purpose of General Board 
of Higher Education and Ministry. GBHM. 

418-HE-1505-D General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry. GCRR. 

832-HE-1505-D Objectives of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GBHM. 

833-HE-1505-D Objectives of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GCRR. 

834-HE-1505-D Objectives of General 
Bo£u-d of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GBHM. 

835-HE-1505-D Objectives of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GCRR. 

836-HE-1505-D Objectives of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GBHM. 

1051-HE-1505-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

837-HE-1506-D Responsibilities of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GBHM. 

839-HE-1508-D OfTices. GBHM. 

840-HE-1509-D Ministerial Education 
Fund. GBHM. 

419-HE-1511-D Duties of Division of 
Chaplains and Related Ministries. GCRR. 

841-HE-1511-D Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries. GBHM. 

842-HE-1511-D Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries. GBHM. 

843-HE-1511-D Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries. GCRR. 

844-HE-1512-D Receipt and distribution of 
funds. GBHM. 

420-HE-1513-D Division of Higher Educa- 
tion. GCRR. 

845-HE-1513-D General Responsibilities of 
Division of Higher Education. GBHM. 

421-HE-1514-D Responsibilities to General 
and Annual Conferences. GCRR. 

846-HE-1514-D Responsibihties to General 
and Annual Conferences. GBHM. 

275-HE.1515-D Student Recognition Day. 
HOL. 

847-HE-1515-D Responsibilities to Institu- 
tions. GBHM. 

838-HE-1S16-D Responsibilities of General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry. 
GBHM. 

848-HE-1516-D Financing Higher Educa- 
tion. GBHM. 

2196-HE-1516-D Financing higher educa- 
tion. Administrative Council, ML Holly 
Springs UMC, Mt. Holly Springs, Pennsyl- 



422-HE-1517-DUmversitySenate. GCRR. 

849-HE-1517-D University Senate. GCSW. 

850-HE-1517-D University Senate. 
GBHM. 

86 1-HE- 15 17-D University Senate. GCSW. 

2661-HE-1617-D University Senate. 
GBHM Division of Higher Education, + 
University Senate. 

852-HE-1518-D Purposes and Objectives of 
University Senate. GBHM. 

165-HE-1S20-D University Senate. NIN. 

853-HE-1520-D Responsibilities of Univer- 
sity Senate. GBHM. 

854-HE-1526-D Responsibilities of Division 
of Diaconal Ministry. GBHM. 

855-HE-1529-D Responsibilities of Division 
of Ordained Ministry. GBHM. 

856-HE-1531-D United Methodist schools 
of theology. GBHM. 

1052-HE-1531-D United Methodist schools 
of theology. ACST. 

355-HE-3000-R$ "African Initiative". 
PNW. 

356-HE-3000-R$ United Methodist related 
University in Africa. KSE. 

357-HE-3000-R$ Hawaii Loa CoUege Sup- 
port. CAP. 

358-HE-3000-R Peace Colleges. WVA 

626-HE-3000-R$ Educational Support for 
Conscientious Objectors to Registration and 
the Draft. GBCS. 

928-HE-3000-R$ The Africa Higher Educa- 
tion Initiative Fund. GBHM + CC Executive 
Committee. 

1074-HE-3000-R$ Black Colleges Histori- 
cally Related to The United Methodist Church 
and the Black CoUege Fund. GBHM, and Black 
Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

1080-HE-3000-R$ $100M Scholarship En- 
dowment Fund. GBHM. 

1081-HE-3000-R$ Goals for the Black Col- 
lege Fund. Commission on Black Colleges, + 
Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

1082-HE-3000-R$ The Africa Initiative: a 
United Methodist University for Africa. 
GBHM. 

1257-HE-3000-R$ General Educational 
Fund. Linwood G. Cook, VIR. 

1357.HE-3000-R$ Foundational Courses. 
NNY Board of Diaconal Ministry, and Council 
on Ministries. 

1393-HE-3000-R Change name of Black 
CoUege Fund. Administrative Board, Union 
Chapel UMC, Monroe, Georgia. 

1707.HE-3000-R Oppose church-related 
university in Zimbabwe. Crusaders Class, First 
UMC, Lancaster, Texas. 

1708-HE-3000-R Seminary training for 
town and rural pastors. H Glenn Biddle, WOH. 

2483-HE-3000-R Courses necessary for a 
weU trained minister. Members, Swaim 
Memorial UMC, Jacksonville, Florida. 

2484-HE-3000-R Speech training. Mem- 
bers, Swaim Memorial UMC, Jacksonville, 
Florida 

2485-HE-30O0-R Seminary training for 
town and rural pastors. National United 



Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 5 other or- 
ganizations and 2 local churches. 

2486-HE-3000-R Postpone estabUshment 
of a church-related university in Africa. Robert 
C. Grandy, West Chelmsford UMC, West 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

2487-HE-3000-R Opposition to funding 
Methodist imiversity in Zimbabwe. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Murrysville, 
Pennsylvania 

2488-HE-3000-R Right to coUective bar- 
gaining. Students at Boston University Schoo, 
of Theology, members of 10 cmnual conferences. 

2489-HE-3000-R Faculty at Schools O 
Theology. Tasker N. Rodman, UMC, Leach 
ville, Arkansas. 

2490-HE-3000-R Higher ethical standards 
for athletics at United Methodist related col- 
leges emd universities. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2544-HE-3000-R Voting of members of 
General Board of Higher Education and Mini- 
stry. Administrative Council, Calvary UMC, 
Salem, Virginia. 

2S45-HE-3000-R Continuing education 
courses for Native American pastors. Native 
American International Caucus. 

2546-HE-3000-R$ Forum on Native 
American Theology in the Christian Church. 
Native American International Caucus. 

2547-HE-3000-R Opposition to coUege in 
Mozambique. Tasker N. Rodman, UMC, 
Leachville, Arkansas. 

2548-HE-3000-R$ In support for a United 
Methodist Church related university in Africa. 
Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2549-HE-3000-R$ Education. Black 

Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2657-HE-3000-REmployment of cultmem- 
bers. Administrative Council, Mt. Holly 
Springs UMC, Mt. Holly, Pennsylvania. 

947-HE-3000-S$ Study Commission on 
Models of Theological Education and Patterns 
of Ministry. GCRR. 



Independent Commis- 
sions / Judicial Ad- 
ministration 

409-1 J-700-D District Directors of Religion 
and Race. GCRR. 

799-IJ-737-D Conference Commission on 
Archives and History. GCAH. 

1289-IJ-737-D Annual Conference His- 
torian. Walter N. Vernon, NTX. 

1641-IJ-737-D Conference Commission on 
Archives and History. WOH Commission on 
Archives and History. 

1781-IJ-737-D Conference Commission on 
Archives emd Histoty. Edwin Schell, BAL. 

1873-IJ-737-D Conference Historian. Lil- 
lian Skeele, New Life UMC, Columbus, Ohio. 

544-IJ-738-D Annual Conference Commis- 
sion on Christian Unity and Inter-religious 
Concerns. GCCU. 



AprU 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



49 



1782-IJ-738-D Optional Conference Com- 
mission on Christian Unity and Inter-religious 
Concerns. Barrett Renfro, SWT. 

127-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
ReUgion and Race. BAL, CAP, KEN, NIL, 
SNJ, TRY, WPA, WVA, WYO. 

128-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race. AKM. 

129-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race. GCRR, AKM, CAP, KEN, 
NIL, SNJ, TRY, VIR, WPA, WVA 

130-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race. GCRR, AKM, BAL, CAP, 
KEN, NIL, SNJ, TRY, VIR, WPA, WVA. 

171-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race. RIO. 

408-IJ-739-D Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race. GCRR. 

1113-IJ-739-D Membership of Conference 
Commission on ReUgion and Race. GCOM. 

1586-IJ-739-D Amend Par. 739.2. PEN. 

1784-IJ-739-D Optional Conference Com- 
mission on Religion and Race. Barrett Renfro, 
SWT. 

131-IJ-740-D Delete Conference Conunis- 
sion on Status and Role of Women. NWT + 
members. Central UMC, Meridian, Mississippi, 
and 1 individual. 

359-IJ-1804-D Membership of General 
Commission on Archives and History. Com- 
mission on the General Conference. 

861-IJ-1804-D Membership of the General 
Commission on Archives £ind History. GCAH. 

1487-1 J- 1804-D Membership of General 
Commission on Archives and History. Com- 
mission on the General Conference. 

862-IJ-1810-D Historical Society. GCAH. 

863-IJ-1812-D Historic Shrines, Historic 
Landmarks, emd Historic Sites. GCAH. 

864-IJ-1812-D Responsibilities connected 
with historic shrines, historic landmarks, £md 
historic sites. GCSW. 

865-IJ-1812-D Historic Shrines and 
Landmarks. GCAH. 

895-IJ-1905-D General Commission on 
Communication. GCSW. 

1649-IJ-1905-D Retain Par. 1905. AFL 
United Methodist Women Executive Committee, 
2 District UMW + 3 local churches and 1 local 
UMW. 

1055-IJ-1906-D Joint Committee on 
Stewardship. ACST. 

1650-IJ-1906-D ResponsibiUties of the 
General Commission on Communication. Ad- 
ministrative Councils, Trinity UMC, Byesville, 
and Pleasant City UMC, Pleasant City, Ohio. 

1878-1 J-1906-D Responsibilities of General 
Commission on Communication. Arthur R. 
Kirk, EOH 

2060-IJ-1906-D Responsibilities of General 
Commission on Communication. Native 
American International Caucus. 

1153-1 J- 1907-D Membership of the 
General Commission on Communication. 
GCFA 

360-IJ-2002-D General Commission on 
Christian Unity and Inter-religious Concerns. 



Administrative Board, Christ UMC, Greenfield, 
Wisconsin. 

661-IJ-2003-D ResponsibiUties of General 
Commission on Christian emd Inter-reUgious 
Concerns. GCCU 

1800-IJ-2003-D Explore concordats with 
other churches in the Wesleyan tradition. 
Leonardo. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

562-IJ-2005-D Election Procedures. 
GCCU. 

2198-IJ-2005-D Responsibilities of General 
Commission on Christian Unity and Inter- 
religious Concerns. Paul F. Perry, SWT. 

563-IJ-2006-D Membership of General 
Commission on Christian Unity and Inter- 
reUgious Concerns. GCCU. 

564-IJ-2007-D Joint Commission on 
Cooperation and Council. GCCU, CPMC. 

425-IJ-2108-D General Commission on 
ReUgion and Race. GCRR. 

866-IJ-2108-D General Commission on 
ReUgion and Race. GCSW. 

867-IJ-2108-D General Commission on 
Religion and Race. GCRR. 

152-IJ-2201-D Dissolve General Commis- 
sion on the Status and Role of Women. NWT 
+ 5 individuals. 

889-IJ-2202-D Transfer responsibQities. 
NMX. 

426-IJ-2203-D General Commission on 
Status and Role of Women ResponsibiUties. 
GCRR. 

868-IJ-2204-D General Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women. GCSW. 

869-IJ-2208-D Election of general 
secretariat. GCSW. 

568-IJ-2400-D$ Commission on Pan 
Methodist Cooperation. GCCU. 

9€6-IJ-2400-D$ Commission on Pan- 
Methodist Cooperation. CPMC. 

566-IJ-2401.D Worid Methodist Council. 
GCCU. 

601-IJ-2401-D Worid Methodist CouncU. 
GBGM. 

567-IJ-2402-D Interdenominational 

Cooperation Fund. GCCU. 

875-IJ-2600-D Choosing a Trial. GBHM. 

1880-IJ-2600-D Impeachment of Judicial 
Council members. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1881-IJ-2600-D General Provisions. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

1882-IJ-2600-D Annual Conference 
Judiciary Committee. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

430-IJ-2601-D Judicial Council. GCRR. 

871-IJ-2601-D Judicial Council. GCSW. 

1883-IJ-2601-D Nominations for Judicial 
Council. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1801-IJ-2605-D FiUing temporary vacancy 
on Judicial Council. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1884-IJ-2605-D Addition of Rule 12. ^erry 
Eckert, WIS. 

2270-IJ-2606-D Judicial Council. Earl R. 
Black, SIL 

1885-IJ-2612-D Additions to Par. 2612. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 



1802-IJ-2613-D Extend right of appeal. 
Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community 
UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

517-IJ-2614-D Process of Appeal. Thomas 
H. Griffith, CAP. 

1803-IJ-2614-D Jurisdiction of the Judicial 
CouncU. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1886-IJ-2614-D Appeals. Jerry Eckert, 
WIS. 

2271-IJ-2614-D PubUcation of decisions of 
Jurisdictional Committees on Appeed. Earl R 
Black, SIL. 

158-IJ-2615-D Declaratory Decisions. 
MEM. 

1887-IJ-2620-D PreUminary Assumptions. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2272-IJ-2620-D Legal civil rights of any ac- 
cused person. Earl R. Black, SIL. 

361-IJ-2621-D Sexual Abuse or Harass 
ment. BAL. 

431-IJ-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. 
GCRR. 

518-IJ-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. 
GBCS. 

872-IJ-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. 
GBHM. 

873-1 J-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. 
GCSW. 

874-IJ-2621-D Choosing a Trial. GBHM. 

1023-1 J -262 1-D Retain Par. 2621.1(b). 
WNCBOM, SGA delegation, AFL UMW, 2Dis 
trict UMW, + 14 local churches and 1 in 
dividual. 

1350-IJ-2621-D Additional Chargeable Of 
fense. Frank Finkbiner and Thomas W. Grif- 
fith, CAP. 

1460-IJ-2621-D Retain Par. 2621.1 (b) and 
(c). Administrative Board, St. John UMC, 
Mobile, Alabama. 

1501-IJ-2621-D Chargeable offenses. 
Kevin Baxter and Peter Milloy, MNN 

1654-IJ-2621-D Retain Par. 2621. Mem- 
bers, Hindman UMC, Hindman, Kentucky. 

1888-1 J-262 1-D Chargeable Offenses. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2 199-1 J-262 1-D Chargeable Offenses. 
Howard L. Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, 
Texas. 

2273-IJ-2621-D Minister's right to trial in 
oise of involuntary retirement Earl R. Black, 
SIL. 

1351-IJ-2622-D Church Trials. Norman D. 
Roe, SWT. 

1889-IJ-2622-D Charges. Jerry Eckert, 
WIS. 

876-IJ-2623-D Investigation Procedures. 
GBHM. 

877-IJ-2623-D Investigation Procedures. 
GCSW. 

1101-IJ-2623-D Roles of the Committee on 
Investigation and the Joint Review Committee. 
Thomas H Griffith, Frank Finkbiner and, 
Harold Johnson, CAP. 

1324-1 J-2623-D Church Trials. Norman D. 
Roe, SWT. 

1S91-IJ-2623-D Membership of Jurisdic- 
tional and Central Conference Committees on 



50 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



Appeals. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1737-IJ-2623-D Amend Par. 2623. Ad- 
ministrative Council, First UMC, Cardington, 
Ohio and Administrative Board, Alger 
Memorial UMC, Eaton, Colorado. 

1804-IJ-2623-D Proceedings in the Inves- 
tigation. Administrative Board, Church of the 
Cross, Wooster, Ohio. 

1890-IJ-2623-D Investigation Procedures. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2081-IJ-2623-D Joint Review Committee. 
8 ministerial members, AFL. 

2082-IJ-2623-D Proceedings in the inves- 
tigation. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Plymouth, Michigan, and UMW, St. Mark's 
UMC, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

362-IJ-2624-D Open Trial. BAL. 

363-IJ-2624-D Funds for Assistant Coun- 
sel. BAL. 

432-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. GCRR. 

878-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. GBHM. 

879-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. GCSW. 

880-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. GBHM. 

881-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. GBHM. 

882-IJ-2624-D Trial of a Lay Member of a 
Local Church. GCSW. 

896-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. UCOM. 

1325-IJ-2624-D Convening of the Court. 
Thomas H Griffith, CAP. 

1352-IJ-2624-D Church Trials. Norman D. 
Roe, SWT. 

1806-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. Leonard 
D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

1891-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

2083-IJ-2624-D Open trial. 8 ministerial 
members, AFL. 

2084-IJ-2624-D Reporting costs of a trial. 
8 ministerial members, AFL. 

2274-IJ-2624-D Trial Procedures. Earl R. 
Black, SIL. 

883-IJ-2625-D Financial Assistance. 
GBHM. 

1807-IJ-2625.D Amend Part. 2625.3. 
Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community 
UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1808-IJ-2625-D Further appeal to Judicial 
Council. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1892-IJ-2625-D Appeal Procedures. Jerry 
Eckert, WUS. 

2085-IJ-2625-D Appeal procedures. 8 min- 
isterial members, AFL. 

2275-IJ-2625-D Appeal Procedures. Earl 
R. Black, SIL. 

610-IJ-2626-D Withdrawal of deaconess or 
home missionary. GBGM. 

884-IJ-2626-D Miscellaneous Provisions. 
GBHM. 

885-IJ-2626-D Miscellaneous Provisions. 
GBHM. 

433-IJ-3000-M Permanent Christmas Sun- 
day. Milton Vallery, First UMC, Alexandria, 
Louisiana. 



434-IJ-3000-M Permanent Easter Sunday. 
Milton Vallery, First UMC, Alexandria, 
Louisiana. 

1016-IJ-3000-M Report of Commission on 
Pan-Methodist Cooperation. CPMC. 

1293-IJ-3000-M Quadrennial Report. 
Board of Trustees, John Street United 
Methodist Church. 

1473-IJ-3000-M Language on TV. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Marion UMC, Marion, 
Kentucky. 

365-IJ-3000-R Dissolve General Commis- 
sion on the Status and Role of Women. Nor- 
man Carter, LRK + members, 
Amity/Langley/Point Cedar Charge, Amity, 
Arkansas. 

366-IJ-3000-R Commendation of the 
General Commission on the Status and Role of 
Women. NWT. 

367-IJ-3000-R Continue membership in 
National Council of Churches of Christ in 
U.S.A. WNC. 

368-IJ-3000-R Withdraw from National 
Council of Churches and World Council of 
Churches. Administrative Council, First UMC, 
Leavenworth, Kansas, and members, UMC, 
Leachville, Arkansas. 

369-1 J-3000-R Withdraw from World Coun- 
cil of Churches. Administrative Council, St. 
Paul UMC, College, Alaska. 

370-IJ-3000-R Continue Membership in 
Worid CouncU of Churches. WNC. 

371-IJ-3000-R Consultation on Church 
Union. WNC. 

372-IJ-3000-R COCU Consensus. IWA 

373-IJ-3000-R COCU Consensus. PNW, 
TRY. 

374-IJ-3000-R COCU Consensus. WYO. 

376-IJ-3000-R$ EstabUsh General Com- 
mission on the Inclusiveness of Persons with 
Heindicapping Conditions. WVA. 

377-IJ-3000-R$ Establish Commission on 
Alcohol and Other Drug Concerns. IWA, NDK 
+ members, 121 local churches and 2 in- 
dividuals. 

378-IJ-3000-R United Methodist Television 
Ministry. SIL. 

379-IJ-3000-R Define "Disobedience" as 
Chargeable Offense. Frank L. Williams, BAL. 

380-IJ-3000-R Define "Immorality" as 
Chargeable Offense. Frank L. Williams, BAL. 

435-IJ-3000-R Reconciliation with Mission- 
ary Society. NIN. 

498-IJ-3000-R Global Racism. GCRR. 

627-IJ-3000-R Ecumenical Decade: Chur- 
ches in Solidarity with Women. GBGM. 

628-IJ-3000-R The Ecumenical Decade of 
Churches in Solidarity with Women. GCCU. 

629-IJ-3000-R Continuing Membership in 
the National Council of Church of Christ in the 
U.S.A. GCCU, + WIS CCUIC 

630-IJ-3000-R Continuing Membership in 
the World Council of Churches. GCCC7, + WIS 
CCUIC. 

631.IJ-3000-R Affirmation of COCU Con- 
sensus Document. WIS. 

633-IJ-3000-R COCU Consensus: In Quest 
of a Church of Christ Uniting. GCCU. 



660-1 J-3000-R 500th anniversaiy of arrival 
of Christopher Columbus in the western hemi- 
sphere. GCAH. 

891-IJ-3000-R Transfer of responsibilities. 
NMX. 

971-IJ-30O0-R$ Commission on Pan- 
Methodist Cooperation. CPMC. 

1083-IJ-3000-R Act of Covenanting Bet- 
ween Other Christian Churches and The 
United Methodist Church. Council of Bishops, 
GCCU. 

1260-IJ-3000-R An Ecumenical Decade 
Churches in Solidarity with Women. GCSW. 

1458-IJ-3000-R$ Establish General Com 
mission on Alcohol £md Drug Concerns. Mem 
bers, 9 local churches in Ashton, Dolton, 
Harvey,, Sterling, Sullivan, Walnut, Illinois. 

1516-IJ-3000-R Discontinue membership 
in World CouncU of Churches and National 
CouncU of Churches. Philip K Shriver, Sweet 
Home UMC, Sweet Home, Oregon. 

15 17-IJ-3000-R New Revised Standard Ver- 
sion of the Bible. Administrative Councils, Ad- 
ministrative Boards or members, 32 local 
churches + 2 individuals, in Ohio. 

1607-IJ-3000-R$ Establish General Com- 
mission on Alcohol and Drug Concerns. Mem- 
bers, 28 local churches, in cities and towns, in 
Texas. 

1659-IJ-3000-R Ecumenical celebration of 
Peace with Justice Week. EOH Board of 
Church and Society. 

1709-IJ-3000-R Voluntary Personal Disar- 
mament. DET Division of Church and Society. 

1823-IJ-3000-R Set up an Appeals Court. 
Linda Sue Bailey, CIL. 

1824-IJ-3000-R Discontinue membership, 
financial and other support of WCC and NCCC. 
Robert Hellam, Hilltop UMC, Seaside, Califor- 
nia. 

1826-IJ-3000-R Request Declaratory 
Decision as to meaning and application of Par. 
2625.3. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2550-IJ-3000-R Issues for Native American 
women. Native American International 
Caucus. 

2S51-IJ-3000-R General Commission on 
Alcohol tmd Drugs. Howard L. Lydick, First 
UMC, Richardson, Texas. 

2552-IJ-3000-R Delete all references to 
Status £md Role of Women in Discipline. Ad- 
ministrative Councils, Thurman and Vega 
UMCs, Thurman, Ohio. 

2553-IJ-3000-R$ Native American History. 
Native American Intematioruil Caucus. 

2554-IJ-3000-R Racism/Sexism. Black 
Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2555-IJ-3000-R Sever connections with 
Ohio Council of Churches and National Coun- 
cU of Churches of Christ in USA. Members, St. 
Pauls UMC, McCutchenville, Ohio. 

2556-IJ-3000-R In support of COCU Con- 
sensus Document. Paul F. Perry, SWT. 

2557-IJ-3000-R$ EstabUsh General Com- 
mission on Alcohol and Drug Concerns. Walter 
J. Zabel, BAL + Nancy H Zabel, University 
UMC, College Park, Maryland. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



51 



2558-IJ-3000-R 11 MiUennium Celebration. 
Melhodists United for Peace with Justice. 

2559-IJ-3000-R$ Establish Commission on 
the History of Asian Americans. National 
Federation, Asian American United Methodists. 

2560-IJ-3000-R Commendation of GCRR 
on use of Minority Self-Determination Fund. 
Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. 

2561-IJ-30O0-R Invitation to other 
Autonomous Methodist Churches to discuss 
concordats. Leonardo. Slutz, Hyde Park Com- 
munity UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2644-1 J-3000-R New Revised Standard Ver- 
sion of the Bible. Members, Washington Avenue 
UMC, Columbus, and Westminster UMC, Har- 
rod, Ohio. 

375-IJ-3000-S$ Commission on Higher 
Education for Minorities. WVA. 

1822-IJ-3000-S$ Request Judicial Council 
to prepare revisions and recirrangement of 
Chapter Eight of Discipline. Leonardo. Slutz, 
HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Local Church 

951-LC-46-C Eliminate Charge Conference 
in charges of only one church. Darrel Loar, 
WOH. 

1298-LC-47-C Eliminate Charge Con- 
ference in charges of only one church. Oarrel 
Loar, WOH. 

1104-LC-lOO-D The Journey of a Connec- 
tional People. GCOM. 

1032-LC-lOl-D The Church. MUMC. 

29-LC-103-D Mission of the Church. NDK. 

437-LC-103-D Displaying or Flying Flags. 
Mark Wesley SCamm, CPA. 

1033-LC-103-D The Mission of the Church. 
MUMC. 

1034-LC-103-D The Mission of the Church. 
MUMC. 

1299-LC-107-D The People of God. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

922-LC-200-D Class Meetings. NJY. 

668-LC-202-D The Church and Pastoral 
Charge. GCSW. 

1431-LC-202-D Retain Par. 202. AFL 
UMWEx. Com. + 2 Oistrict UMW, and 4 local 
churches. 

669-LC-203-D Community of Persons. 
GCSW. 

2117-LC-204-D Responsibility of local 
church for missional use of resources. United 
Methodist Appalachian Development Commit- 
tee. 

670-LC-205-D Pastor in charge. GBHM. 

30-LC-206-D Shared Facilities. CSV. 

386-LC-206-D Shared Facilities. GCRR + 
MARCHA and NFAAUM. 

1927-LC-206-D Conference support of ex- 
isting cooperative parishes. Claudia G. Harrel- 
son, WNC 

2118-LC-206-D Use of UM churches by 
other denominations in emergency situations. 
Lorena Crosby, Panama UMC, Panama, New 
York. 

671-LC-207-D Churches in Transitional 
Communities. GCSW. 



1432-LC-207-D Retain Par. 207,1. AFL 
UMWEx. Com. + 2 District UMW, and 4 local 
churches. 

2218-LC-207-D Transitional Communities. 
HaroU Oechsle, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, St. 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

1099-LC-207-D Qualifications of officers of 
local church. /, Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

2283-LC-208-D Membership in The United 
Methodist Church. Members, Emmanuel UMC, 
Beltsville, Maryland. 

2284-LC-208-D Membership in The United 
Methodist Church. Members, Wesley UMC, Am- 
herst, Massachusetts. 

31-LC-209-D Church Membership. NAL. 
1433-LC-209-D Church membership. 
Mitchell Williams, NAL. 

32-LC-211-D Meaning of Membership. 
SIL. 

672-LC-211-D Church Membership. 
GCSW. 

1616-LC-211-D Retain Par. 211. Ad- 
ministrative Board, St. John UMC, Mobile, 
Alabama and members. Liberty Chapel UMC,, 
Blue Creek, Ohio, and Parkview UMC, Benton, 
Arkansas. 

33-LC-216-D Confirmed Member. NAL. 
164-LC-216-D Renewal of Membership 
Vows. NIN. 

1434-LC-216-D Church membership. 
Mitchell Williams, NAL. 

673-LC-218-D Person in mOitary service. 
GBHM. 

34-LC-224-D Nonconfirmed Member. 
NAL. 

1435-LC-224-D Church membership. 
Mitchell Williams, NAL. 

169-LC-227-D RighU of Local Church Af- 
filiate/Associate Members. SWT. 

1349-LC-227-D Affiliate and Associate 
Membership. Jeffrey W. Morey, Bellevue 
Heights UMC, Syracuse, New York. 

35-LC-230-D Care of Members. RKM. 
36-LC-230-D Certificate of Membership. 
SDK 

655-LC-230-D Care of Members. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Mexico UMC, Mexico, Mis- 
souri. 

1301-LC-230-D Care of Members. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Calvary UMC, Elkhart, In- 
diana. 

1302-LC-230-D Care of Members. Church 
Conference, Trinity UMC, Los Osos, California. 
1436-LC-230-D Membership roll. YEL. 
1464-LC-230-D Amend Par. 230.1. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Sunset UMC, Pasadena, 
Texas. 

1727-LC-230-D Amend Par. 230. 1. Nation- 
al United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 2 or- 
ganizations, 1 local church and 1 individual. 

1842-LC-230-D Addresses of members. 
William C. Durrett, BAL. 

2119-LC-230-D Care of Members. PaulF. 
Perry, SWT. 

674-LC-231-D Records of discontinued local 
church. GCAH. 

675-LC-234-D Membership records. 
GBOD, GCFA. 



2120-LC-234-D Membership records. 
Galen Luebke, WIS. 

2219-LC-234-D Computer records. Harold 
Oechsle, NIN + Victor Goldschmidt, SL 
Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

1929-LC-236-D Recording change of mem- 
bership status. Michael W. Walker, NTX. 

1928-LC-239-D Charge Conference and An- 
nual Conference Reports. Leon Wagnon HI, 
SCA. 

438-LC-240-D Requirement for Church 
Membership. Wilbur Wilcox, IWA. 

1930-LC-240-D Certificate of Transfer. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Blair, Nebras- 
ka. 

387-LC-244-D Amend Par, 244.2. GCRR. 

676-LC-244-D Basic responsibilities of local 
church. GCAH. 

1035-LC-244-D The Local Church. MUMC. 

1931-LC-244-D Organization of Local 
Church. Darrel Loar, WOH. 

37-LC-245-D Local Church Administration. 
WVA. 

1933-LC-245-D Organization of local 
church. June D. McCullough, Audubon UMC, 
Audubon, New Jersey. 

2121-LC-245-D Staff-Parish Relations 
Committee. R. Dulaney Barrett, SWT. 

2220-LC-245-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. National Association, An- 
nual Conference Lay Leaders. 

439-LC-246-D Honorary Members of 
Charge Conference. WNC Council on Adult 
Ministries, + members, Salem UMC, Scotia, 
Nebraska. 

1405-LC-246-D Honorary Members of 
Charge Conference. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Phoenix, Arizona. 

1618-LC-246-D Charge Conference. Archie 
B. Coleman, MSS. 

1934-LC-246-D Eliminate charge confer- 
ence in charges of only one church. Darrel 
Loar, WOH. 

38-LC-247-D Notification of Apportion- 
ments. DET, HOL, NCA + 95 local churches, 
and 13 individuals. 

176-LC-247-D Membership of Administra- 
tive Council or Administrative Board. RIO + 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Phoenix, 
Arizona and Mattie M. Henderson, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

345-LC-247-D Church Historian. EPA, 
HOL, SWT Commissions on Archives and His- 
tory, + 3 historical societies and 1 individual. 
440-LC-247-D Salary Setting Authority. 
Roger K. Short, NAL. 

522-LC-247-D Membership of Administra- 
tive Council or Administrative Board. WNC 
Council on Adult Ministries. 

572-LC-247-D Charge Conference. GBGM. 
677-LC-247-D Church Historian. GCAH, 
MNNCAH. 

1390-LC-247-D Permanent file for records. 
Donald H. Schell, First UMC, Hendersonville, 
North Carolina. 

1406-LC-247-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. Robert Dickerson, 
AFL. 



52 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1499-LC-247-D Amend Par. 247.6. PEN 

delegation. 

1763-LC-247-D At Large Members of the 
Administrative Board. Linda Sue Bailey, CIL. 

1935-LC-247-D Eliminate Charge Con- 
ference in charges of only one church. Barrel 
Loar, WON. 

1936-LC-247-D Powers and Duties of 
Ch£irge Conference. Bruce Birch, BAL. 

2627-LC-247-D Financial accountability. 
Paul Wesley, LSA + 3 other individuals. 

1932-LC-248-D Basic organizational plan 
for the local church. Barrel Loar, WOH. 

1937-LC-248-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

2122-LC-248-D Church Conference. 
Marian Brown, Rosemount UMC, Rosemount, 
Minnesota. 

678-LC-249-D Powers and Duties of Charge 
Conference. GBOB. 

1437-LC-249-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. Ernest Harold, 
Reynoldsburg UMC, Reynoldsburg, Ohio. 

1938-LC-249-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

2123-LC-249-D Church Conference. 
Marian Brown, Rosemount UMC, Rosemount, 



2221-LC-249-D Charge or Church Con- 
ference. National Association, Annual Con- 
ference Lay Leaders. 

381-LC-250-D Stewards. SCA. 

679-LC-250-D Chairpersons of work areas. 
GBOB. 

1939-LC-250-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

2124-LC-250-D Stewards. Paul F. Perry, 
SWT. 

39-LC-251-D Local Church Lay Leader. 
MEM. 

442-LC-251-D Church Lay Leader Member 
of Annual Conference. NAK Council on Lay 
Life and Work. 

680-LC-251-D Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader. GBOB. 

681-LC-251-D Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader. MEM. 

682-LC-251-D Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader. GBOB. 

683-LC-251-D Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader. MEM. 

684-LC-251-D Associate Lay Leaders. 
GBOB. 

1026-LC-251-D Election and Respon- 
sibihties of Lay Leader. Paul Wells + Paul J. 
Meuschke, WPA, Laketon Heights UMC, Pit- 
tsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

1438-LC-251-D Dermition of lay leader and 
lay member. Lonnie B. Brooks, Christ UMC, 
Sugar Land, Texas. 

1940-LC-251-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

2125-LC-251-D Lay Leader. Paul F. Perry, 
SWT. 



2 126-LC-251-D Lay delegates. Barbaraand 
Erroll Wendland, First UMC, Temple, Texas. 

2222-LC-261-D Lay leader. National As- 
sociation, Annual Conference Lay Leaders. 

40-LC-252-D Administrative Council. 
RKM. 

685-LC-252-D Work Area on Evangelism. 
GBOB. 

1941-LC-252-D Delete Par. 252. Barrel 
Loar, WOH. 

2127-LC-252-D Administrative Council. 
Gary Ponder-Williams, MOE. 

2128-LC-252-D Responsibility of local 
church for missional use of resources. United 
Methodist Appalachian Bevelopment Commit- 
tee. 

2223-LC-252-D Delete Par. 252. Id. Nation- 
al Association, Annual Conference Lay Leaders. 

41-LC-253-D Board of Stewards. FLA. 

1620-LC-253-D Minutes of Administrative 
Board meetings. Administrative Board, Centen- 
ary UMC, Skowhegan, Maine. 

1942-LC-253-D Delete Par. 253. Barrel 
Loar, WOH 

2224-LC-253-D Membership of Ad- 
ministrative Boeird. National Association of 
Annual Conference Lay, Leaders. 

42-LC-254-D Administrative Board Mem- 
bership. RKM. 

388-LC-254-D Committed to Inclusiveness. 
GCRR. 

686-LC-254-D Coordinator of Scouting 
Ministries. GBOB + Administrative Council, 
Grace UMC, Memphis, Tennessee + 1 in- 
dividual. 

1439-LC-254-D Rights of pastor. Richard 
T. Commander, NCA. 

1621-LC-254-D Membership of Ad- 
ministrative Board. Administrative Board, 
Centenary UMC, Skowhegan, Maine. 

1943-LC-254-D Membership of Ad- 
ministrative Board. Walter J. label, BAL. 

1944-LC-255-D Administrative Board. 
Barrel Loar, WOH. 

261-LC-256-D Clergy Couples Housing. 

acsw, CAP. 

687-LC-256-D Pastor in charge. GBHM. 

689-LC-256-D Editorial deletion. GCFA, 
GCSW. 

1128-LC-256-D Housing for Pastors. 
GCFA. 

1303-LC-256-D Housing as Remuneration. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1440-LC-256-D Responsibilities of Ad- 
ministrative Board. Richard T. Commander, 
NCA. 

1441-LC-256-D Retain Par. 256.3(0. AFL 
UMWEx. Com + Andalusia and Mobile Bist. 
UMW, and 3 local churches. 

1945-LC-256-D Amend Par. 256. Barrel 
Loar, WOH. 

1946-LC-257-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

43-LC-258-D Omcers of Local Church 
Council on Ministries. MEM. 

175-LC-258-D Local Church Council on 
Ministries. GCOM, RIO. 



389-LC-258-D Inclusiveness. GCRR. 

443-LC-258-D Chairperson on Prayer Life. 
Council on Ministries, Ferrisburg UMC, Ferris- 
burg, Vermont. 

444-LC-258-D Church Historian on Coun- 
cil on Ministries. FLA Commission on Ar- 
chives and History. 

690-LC-258-D Membership of Council on 
Ministries. GBOB + Administrative Council, 
Grace UMC, Memphis, Tennessee + 1 in- 
dividual. 

1843-LC-258-D Basic Membership of Coun- 
cil on Ministries. Annual Church Meeting, 
Aldersgate UMC, Bobbs Ferry, New York. 

1947-LC-258-D Chairperson of Council on 
Ministries. Charles W. Lightner, BAL. 

1948-LC-258-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

2225-LC-258-D Membership of Council on 
Ministries. National Association, Annual Con- 
ference Lay Leaders. 

691-LC-259-D Youth and adult ministiy 
coordinators. GBOB. 

1949-LC-259-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

1950-LC-260-D Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference. Barrel Loar, 
WOH. 

159-LC-261-D Local Church Evangelism 
Coordinator. NIN. 

390-LC-261-D Work Areas. GCRR. 

692-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
education. GBOB. 

693-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
higher education and ministry. GBHM. 

694-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
higher education and ministry. GBOB. 

695-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
higher education and ministry. GBHM. 

696-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
stewardship. GBOB. 

697-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
worship. GCRR. 

1507-LC-261-D Work Area on Music. 
Linda Volland, St. Mark's UMC, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, and Susan M. Parker, St. Luke 
UMC, Sanford, North Carolina. 

1619-LC-261-D Amend Par. 261.10. Linda 
Volland, St. Mark's UMC, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

1759-LC-261-D Work area chairperson of 
the status and role of women. Members, North 
Broadway UMC, Worthington, Ohio. 

1844-LC-261-D Change "EvangeUsm" to 
"Church Growth and Evangelism". Richard W. 
Thomas, WOH. 

2129-LC-261-D Responsibility of local 
church for missional use of resources. United 
Methodist Appalachian Bevelopment Commit- 
tee. 

2226-LC-261-D Chairperson of Work Area 
on Stewardship. Robert J. Bexter, NIN + 3 
other individuals. 

2462-LC-261-D Tithing. CAP Cabinet + 2 
other individuals. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



53 



573-LC-262-D Responsibilities of health 
and welfare ministries representatives. 
GBGM. 

698-LC-262-D Superintendent of the 
church school. GBOD. 

2130-LC-262-D Superintendent of the Sun- 
day School. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

44-LC-263-D United Methodist Men. NAL. 

699-LC-263-D Work area chairperson on 
education. GBOD + Administrative Council, 
Grace UMC, Memphis, Tennessee + 1 in- 
dividual. 

700-LC-263-D United Methodist Men. 
GBOD. 

1571-LC-263-D Change "Older Adult" to 
"Golden Age". Lee F. Wynn Sr., First UMC, 
Griffin, Georgia. 

1617-LC-263-D Church Library. Mildred 
Thompson, Church Street UMC, Knoxville, 
Tennessee, and Richard C. Looney Sr, HOL. 

1951-LC-263-D United Methodist Men. 
NEB United Methodist Men. 

2227-LC-263-D Church School Curriculum 
Materials. Harold Oechsle, NIN + Victor 
Goldschmidt, St Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2228-LC-263-D United Methodist Women. 
Victor Goldschmidt, St Andrew UMC, West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

1442-LC-264-D Women and Children Coor- 
dinators. Betty Hill Jones, Bethlehem UMC, 
Moneta, Virginia. 

1572-LC-264-D Change "Older Adult" to 
"Golden Age". Lee F. Wynn Sr., First UMC, 
Griffin, Georgia. 

531-LC-265.-D Work Area Commission. 
GCCU 

45-LC-267-D Committee on Nominations 
and Personnel. GBOD, MEM. 

46-LC-267-D Duties of Pastor-Parish Rela- 
tions and Finance Committees. MEM. 

167-LC-267-D Local Church Staff Posi- 
tions. SWT. 

391-LC-267-D Cross Racial Appointments. 
GCRR. 

445-LC-267-D Clarify requirements for 
membership on committees. J. Richard Ward, 
Christiana UMC, Christiana, Delaware. 

446-LC-267-D Staff Parish Relations Com- 
mittee. Bruce Buller, MNN. 

447-LC-267-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. Gerald R. Lewis, 
WOH 

448-LC-267-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. Jim Beal, NAK. 

449-LC-267-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. Edgar W. Rober- 
sonJr,EPA. 

450-LC-267-D Dismissal of staff. George A. 
Kahl, Grace UMC, Baltimore, Maryland. 

701-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations. GBHM. 

702-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations. GBOD. 



1304-LC-267-D Duties of the Committee on 
Pastor-Parish Relations. John B. Moore, 
Western Reserve UMC, Salem, Ohio. 

1329-LC-267-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. Lester L. Moore, 
IWA + Flora J. Cobb, Edenton St UMC, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

1332-LC-267-D Financial Secretary. Albert 
Van Reenen, WVA. 

1333-LC-267-D Chair of Nominating Com- 
mittee. Edison B. Heard, WPA + 2 local chur- 
ches. 

1361-LC-267-D Duties of Committee on 
Pastor-Parish Relations. John J. Shaffer, CIL. 

1407-LC-267-D Nominating Process. 
i?o6er/ Dickerson, AFL. 

1422-LC-267-D Stewardship. Robert Wal- 
den, Madison United Methodist Church, 
Madison, New Jersey. 

1443-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. Richard T. Commander, 
NCA. 

1444-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor- 
Parish Relations. Richard T. Commander, 
NCA. 

1573-LC-267.D Amend Par. 267.2f(8). 
Richard T. Commander, NCA. 

1622-LC-267-D Adequate life and health in- 
surance and pension benefits. Elizabeth G. 
Taylor, Central UMC, Charlotte, North 
Carolina. 

1623-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor- 
Parish Relations. Archie B. Coleman, MSS. 

1624-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. Members, Graham Road 
UMC, Falls Church, Virginia. 

1626-LC-267-D Employment Practices. 
Southeastern Jurisdiction Association, Con- 
ference Boards ofDiaconal Ministry. 

1627-LC-267-D Pastor's Salary. Jack 
Riley, NMX. 

1628-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor- 
Parish Relations. Administrative Board, Cen- 
tenary UMC, Skowhegan, Maine. 

1629-LC-267-D Board of Trustees. Jim 
Beal, NAK. 

1729-LC-267-D Amend Par. 267.1. Dan 
Tucker, NAK. 

1760-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. H Marie Muddiman, 
Raleigh Court UMC, Roanoke, Virginia. 

1845-LC-267-D Amend Par. 267. Annual 
Church Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs Ferry, 
New York. 

1952-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. H. A. Harrington, LSA. 

1953-LC-267-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. Lois C. DeSantis, 
Richfield UMC, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

1954-LC-267-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. John T. Lundy, 
First-Centenary UMC, Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

1955-LC-267-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. 7 individuals in 
local churches, Baltimore, Maryland, Gulfport, 
Mississippi, Thomasville, North Carolina, 
Washington, DC. 



1956-LC-267-D Membership of Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations. Walter J. Zabel, 
BAL. 

1957-LC-267-D Pastor-Parish Relations 
Committee in Cooperative Parishes. Claudia 
G. Harrelson, WNC 

1958-LC-267-D Evaluation of pastor. 
Eunice Barrett Leyland, Trinity UMC, Newport 
News, Virginia. 

2131-LC-267-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. Adele A. Niblack, 
St. Andrew UMC, Florissant, Missouri. 

2132-LC-267-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel. Philip M. 
Niblack, MOE. 

2133-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. Members, Cambridge 
UMC, Cambridge, Minnesota. 

2134-LC-267-D Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel. William H. Brent, Towson 
UMC, Towson, Maryland. 

2135-LC-267-D ResponsibiUties of Pastor- 
Parish Relations Conmiittee. Kay Gottula and 
Keys Pendleton, WNC. 

2136-LC-267-D Staff-Parish Relations 
Committee. R. Dulaney Barrett, SWT. 

2137-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor- 
Parish Relations. Gordon V. Nelson Jr., VIR. 

2229-LC-267-D Committee on Pastor- 
Parish Relations. MortS. Cox, First UMC, Hot 
Springs, Arkansas. 

2230-LC-267-D Administrative Commit- 
tees. National Association, Annual Conference 
Lay Leaders. 

47-LC-268-D Constituting Church Con- 
ference. ORL 

703-LC-268-D Organizing a new local 
church. GBOD -t- National Federation of Asian 
American, United Methodists. 

1959-LC-268-D Constituting Church Con- 
ference. William E. Ballard, IWA + NC, NE, 
SE Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. + 
Nat. UM Rural Fellowship. 

1761-LC-269-D Delete Par. 269. Leonard 
D. SluU, Hyde Park UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

530-LC-247-D Charge Conference. McCoy 
Gutherie,NAL+ Administrative Board, Whiton 
UMC, Crossville, Alabama. 

157-LC-2500-D Shared Facilities. CNV. 

429-LC-250O-D Shared FaciUties. GCRR, 
MARCHA, NFAAUM and NE Jurisdiction, 
Town and Country Association Executive Com- 
mittee. 

1154-LC-2500-D Local Church Per- 
manent/Endowment Fund Committee. GCFA. 

1155-LC-2500-D Local Church Founda- 
tions. GCFA 

1651-LC-2500-D Local Church Property. 
Jack Riley, NMX. 

1171-LC-2524-D Local Church Board of 
Trustees-Qualifications. GCFA. 

1284-LC-2524-D Board of Trustees. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Olive UMC, Prentess, 
West Virginia. 

1805-LC-2524-D Membership of Board of 
Trustees. Administrative Board, Norwood 
UMC. Norwood, New York. 



54 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1879-LC-2524-D Board of Trustees. An- 
nual Church Meeting, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs 
Ferry, New York 

2065-LC-2524-D Board of Trustees. Wil- 
liam L. Stratton, LVL. 

2066-LC-2524-D Board of Trustees. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Pleasant Valley UMC, 
Wichita, Kansas. 

155-LC-2525-D Local Church Board of 
Trustees. MEM. 

916-LC-2525-D Local Church Board of 
Trustees. GCFA. 

2067-LC-2525-D Chair of Committee on 
Nominations emd Personnel. John T. Lundy, 
First-Centenary UMC, Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

2068-LC-2525-D Board of Trustees. Wil- 
liam L. Stratton, LVL. 

451-LC-2526-D Church Local Conference. 
Peter F. Milloy and Ted G. Colescott, MNN. 

S69-LC-2526-D Church Local Conference. 
Administrative Council, Olive UMC, Fentress, 
West Virginia. 

1 172-LC-2526-D Church Local Conference- 
-Duties, Authority and Membership. GCFA. 

428-LC-2527-D Board of Trustees of 
Cooperative Parish. GCRR. 

1173-LC-2527-D Charge or Cooperative 
Parish Board of Trustees. GCFA 

1174-LC-2528-D Charge Conference- 
Power and Authority. GCFA 

1175-LC-2529-D Local Church Board of 
Trustees-Organization and Membership. 
GCFA 

1590-LC-2529-D Board of Trustees. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Central UMC, Columbus, 
Mississippi. 

2069-LC-2529-D Terms of trustees. Wil- 
liam L. Stratton, LVL. 

1459-LC-2529-D Board of Trustees. R. J. 
Kanary, OKL. 

1176-LC-2530-D Removal of Local Church 
Trustees. GCFA 

2070-LC-2530-D Terminating trustees. 
William L. Stratton, LVL. 

156-LC-2531-D Local Church Board of 
Trustees. CPA. 

1177-LC-2531-D Meetings of Local Church 
Boards of Trustees. GCFA 

452-LC-2532-D Annual Review of Church 
Owned Parsonage. Brian N. Wills, NIN. 

1178-LC-2532-D Board of Trustees- 
Powers and Limitations. GCFA. 

1541-LC-2532-D Clarifying authority of 
Board of Trustees. Edison M. Amos, BAL. 

2286-LC-2532-D Local church property. 
Members, Wesley UMC, Amherst, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

917-LC-2533-D Property Titles-Unincor- 
porated Local Churches. GCFA 

1179-LC-2534-D Unincorporated Local 
Church Property-Notice and Authorization. 
GCFA 

1180-LC-2536-D Incorporated Local 
Church Property-Notice and Authorization. 
GCFA. 

602-LC-2537-D Local Church Property. 
GBGM + Methodists Associated Representing 
the. Cause of Hispanic Americans. 



918-LC-2537-D Resolutions Authorizing 
Local Church Property Transactions. GCFA 

967-LC-2537-D Action to sell or transfer 
property. CPMC. 

603-LC-2S38-D Local Church Property. 
GBGM + Methodists Associated Representing 
the. Cause of Hispanic Americans. 

1181-LC-2538-D Incorporated Local 
Church Property-Sale, Transfer, Lease or 
Mortgage. GCFA 

1182-LC-2539-D Disposition of Church 
Building or Parsonage. GCFA. 

1 183-LC-2540-D Restriction on Proceeds of 
Mortgage or Sale. GCFA 

604-LC-2541-D Building or Purchasing 
New Local Church Property. GBGM. 

968-LC-2541-D Building committee. Billy 
Y. York, NAL. 

1184-LC-2541-D Planning and Financing 
Requirements for Local Church Buildings. 
GCFA 

1277-LC-2541-D Purchase of Property. 
DSW Committee on Congregational Develop- 
ment. 

1185-LC-2542-D Consecration and Dedica- 
tion of Local Church Buildings. GCFA 

605-LC-2543-D Merging Local Churches. 
GBGM. 

1186-LC-2543-D Merger of Local United 
Methodist Churches. GCFA 

2071-LC-2543-D Mergers of two or more 
local churches. Ronald W. Fassett, WMI + NC 
Juris, Urban Network, and Grand Rapids 
Metro Ministry Ex. Committee. 

2072-LC-2543-D Change of terminology. 
Northeastern Jurisdiction Town and Country 
Asso., Executive Committee. 

2073-LC-2543-D Union of two or more local 
churches. William E. Ballard, IWA + NEand 
SE Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. + 
Nat. UM Rural Fellowship. 

2074-LC-2543-D Purpose for uniting local 
churches. William E. Ballard, IWA + 4 or- 
ganizations. 

606-LC-2544-D Merging local churches 
with churches of other denominations. GBGM. 

1187-LC-2544-D Interdenominational 

Local Church Mergers. GCFA 

2075-LC-2544-D Change of terminology. 
Northeastern Jurisdiction Town and Country 
Asso., Executive Committee. 

2076-LC-2544-D Mergers of one or more 
local UMCs with one or more churches of other 
denominations. Ronald W. Fassett, WMI + 
NC Juris. Urban Network, and Grand Rapids 
Metro Ministry Ex. Committee. 

2077-LC-2544-D Uniting of UM congrega- 
tions with congregations of other denomina- 
tions. William E. Ballard, IWA + NC,NE,SE 
Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. + Nat. 
UM Rural Fellowship. 

607-LC-2545-D Deeding church property to 
federated church. GBGM. 

969-LC-2545-D Deeding church property. 
CPMC. 

1188-LC-2545-D Deeding Church Property 
to Federated Churches or Other Evangelical 
Denominations. GCFA. 



2078-LC-2545-D Deeding church property 
to federated church. William E. Ballard, IWA 
+ 4 organizations. 

608-LC-2546-D Discontinuation or Aban- 
donment of Local Church Property. GBGM. 

970-LC-2546-D Discontinuation or Aban- 
donment of Local Church Property. CPMC. 

1156-LC-2546-D Discontinuation or Aban- 
donment of Local Church Property. GCFA 

2079-LC-2546-D Rationale for discontinua- 
tion or abandonment of local church property. 
William E. Ballard, IWA + NC and NE Juris- 
diction, Town and Country Asso. + Nat. UM 
Rural Fellowship. 

2080-LC-2546-D Discontinuation or aban- 
donment of local church property. VIR Cabinet 
+ 4 individuals. 

1189-LC-2547-D Board of Trustees Report 
to the Charge Conference. GCFA 

609-LC-2548-D Small Membership Chur- 
ches. GBGM. 

1190-LC-2548-D Study of Local Church 
Potential. GCFA. 

1191-LC-2549-D Exceptions to Require- 
ments of This Chapter. GCFA. 

349-LC-3000-R Include veteran holidays on 
calendars printed by The United Methodist 
Publishing House. Members, First UMC, 
Meridian, Texas. 

453-LC-3000-R Small Church. Doris W. 
Davis, First UMC, Robinson, Illinois. 

454-LC-3000-R School of Theology Interns. 
Doris W. Davis, First UMC, Robinson, Illinois. 

1518-LC-3000-R Qualifications for Sunday 
School teacher. Anna M. Smith, Mt. Hedding 
UMC. Greenville, West Virginia, and members, 
Hickory Ridge-Tilton Charge, Hickory Ridge, 
Arkansas. 

1710-LC-3000-R Dropping names from the 
rolls in one specific year. Don L. Forsman, 
NMX. 

1711-LC-3000-R "Retired" status for chur- 
ches. Administrative Boards, UMCs, 
Havensville, Soldier, Buck's Grove, Kansas. 

1827-LC-3000-R Titles that Hurt. 
Elizabeth Dill, St. John's UMC, Aiken, South 
Carolina. 

2564-LC-3000-R Local church program and 
facilities for homeless. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Montrose, Colorado. 

2567-LC-30O0-R Membership in supremist 
group, the Ku Klux Han, and membership in 
The United Methodist Church. Members, Wes- 
ley UMC, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

2568-LC-3000-R Charge Conference 
records. Randy J. Strickland, FLA 

2659-LC-3000-R Christian day care 
centers. Administrative Board, Hayes UMC, 
Fremont, Ohio. 

2562-LC-3000-S$ Church-wide study of 
ministerial financial support. EOH Renewal 
Community. 

2563-LC-3000-S$ Church-wide study of 
clergy salary/support structure. National 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, + 5 other 
organizations. 



AprU 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



55 



Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministry 

2207-MN-48-C Amend Par. 48. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2208-MN-53-C Amend Par. 53. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

455-MN-56-C Assistants to the Bishop. 
Odie Gregg, NAL. 

456-MN-57-C Consultations before ap- 
pointments. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

2209-MN-57-C Consultation. Victor 

Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC. West 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

667-MN-llO-D Ecclesiastical Appoint- 
ments. GBHM. 

1300-MN-llO-D Ordain for Service. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

751-MN-300-D Transfers. GBHM. 
709-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal Min- 
istry. GBHM. 

1631-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal 
Ministry. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Clinton, Oklahoma 

1961-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal 
Ministry. Social Concerns Committee, Grace 
UMC, Hicksville, Ohio. 

688-MN-305-D Continuation of Candidacy. 
GBHM. 

55-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy. 
HOL. 

394-MN-306-D Doctrinal Examination. 
GCRR. 

710-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy. 
GBHM. 

711-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy. 
GBHM. 

899-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy. 
GBHM. 

1285-MN-306-D Amend Par. 304.1. 
Portland Affirmation, P. O. Box 12673, 
Portland, Oregon. 

1309-MN-306-D Foundational Studies. 
Eilizabeth Dill, St. John's UMC, Aiken, South 
Carolina. 

712-MN-307-D Consecration. GBHM. 
1463-MN-307-D Consecration Service. 
Shirley L. Ramsey, Red Mountain UMC, Mesa, 
Arizona. 

2138-MN-308-D General Provisions. KSE 
Board of Diaconal Ministry. 

713-MN-309-D Rights of Diaconal Mini- 
sters. GBHM. 

919-MN-309-D Relation of Diaconal Mini- 
sters to Annual Conferences. Leonard D. Slutz, 
HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
1632-MN-309-D Rights of Diaconal Mini- 
sters. AlvinB.Dove,St. James UMC, Pleasant 
Valley, Virginia. 

2139-MN-309-D Lay delegates. Barbara 
and Erroll Wendland, First UMC, Temple, 
Texas. 

714-MN-310-D Service Appointment of 
Diaconal Ministers. GBHM. 



1846-MN-310-D Service Appointment of 
Diaconal Ministers. Members, Asbury UMC, 
Prairie Village, Kansas. 

715-MN-311-D Service of Diaconal Mini- 
sters. GBHM. 

457-MN-313-D Active Service of Diaconal 
Ministers. DonaldABairdandAF.McClung, 

vm. 

752-MN-313-D Change in Conference 
Relationship. GBHM. 

716-MN-314-D Relationship to the Charge 
Conference. GBHM. 

1292-MN-315-D Support of diaconal mini- 
ster. Linda C. Fox, University UMC, Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana 

1962-MN-315-D Relationship to the 
Employing Agency. Ruth Ann Ivey, Bethany 
UMC, Summerville, South Carolina. 

1847-MN-318-D Notification of Dismissal. 
Members, Asbury UMC, Prairie Village, Kan- 
sas. 

79-MN-400-D Extended Parenting Leave. 
CNV. 

81-MN-400-D Readmittance of Elders. 
KEN. 

985-MN-400-D Emerging Missional Mini- 
stries Local Pastor. CNV Board of World Min- 
istries. 

1281-MN-400-D Reappointment to Pas- 
toral Charge after Termination. Manuel V. 
Gaxiola, CNV. 

1338-MN-400-D Clergy participation in 
meirriages of homosexuals and lesbians. Walter 
D. Graham lU, VIR. 

1362-MN-400-D Ordained Ministry. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Levy UMC, North Little 
Rock, Arkansas. 

1848-MN-400-D Special Conditions: Excep- 
tional Promise. Stephen M. Martin, WNC and 
Doris Wellington, Triplett UMC, Mooresville, 
North Carolina 

56-MN-402-D Retain Par. 402.2. 15 annual 
conferences, AFL agencies, IWA, WNC BOMs, 
-^ 568 local groups and 122 individuals. 

57-MN-402-D Delete Par. 402.2. RKM, WIS 
+ 1 local group and 2 individuals. 

58-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. SIL. 
59-MN-402-D Revise Par. 402.2. RKM + 
members, UMC, Earlington, Kentucky. 

60-MN-402-D Amend 402.2. RKM + 4 local 
churches. 

61-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. RKM. 
62-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. RKM. 
63-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. RKM. 
64-MN-402-D Replace Par. 402.2. CNV. 
532-MN-402-D Amend 402.2. NYMO. 
717-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. GCSW. 
718-MN-402-D Amend Paragraph 402.2. 
GBHM + 4 local groups and 1 individual. 

1305-MN-402-D Calling upon ordained 
ministers to demonstrate love of God and 
neighbor. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1306-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Mem- 
bers, Darkesville UMC, Inwood, West Virginia. 
1307-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Robert 
M. Armstrong, Belle Isle UMC, Warners, New 
York. 



1308-MN-402-D Prohibit any ordained min- 
ister from retaining privileges if he/she is 
homosexual. Members, First UMC, Lufkin, 
Texas. 

1348-MN-402-D Retain Par. 402. Ad- 
ministrative Boards, members, 9 local churches 
in Alabama, California, Illinois, New Jersey, 
North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, West Virginia 

1445-MN-402-D Retain Par. 402.1. MaryE. 

Padgett, Callaway UMC, Panama City, Florida. 

1500-MN-402-D Additions to Par. 402. 

Robert M. Armstrong, Belle Isle UMC, 

Warners, New York. 

1511-MN-402-D Disciplined witness by or- 
dained ministers. John R. Dicken, NIB. 

1633-MN-402-D Addition to Par. 402.2. Ar- 
chieB. Coleman, MSS. 

1718-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Christ Church UM, 
Moundsville, West Virginia. 

1849-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. 
Patricia L. Ewing, Union UMC, Bridgeville, 
Delaware. 

1850-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Wil- 
liam C. and Margaret B. Manlove, Union UMC, 
Bridgeville, Delaware. 

1851-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Wil- 
liam and Penny M. E. Pritchett, Union UMC, 
Bridgeville, Delaware. 

1852-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Mem- 
bers, Virginia Beach UMC, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia 

1963-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Union Center UMC, En- 
dicott, New York. 

1964-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Williams Center Asbury 
UMC, Bryan, Ohio. 

1965-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Mem- 
bers, Wesley UMC, Shiloh, and Camden UMC, 
Camden, North Carolina. 

1967-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Councils, 5 local churches, in 
Columbus, Indiana, Frankfort, Kansas, 
Loranger, Louisiana 

2140-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Brian 
E. Carter, IWA. 

2141-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate 
UMC, Atlanta, Georgia. 

2231-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Mar- 
cus Blaising, NIN + 4 other individuals. 

2285-MN-402-D Amend Par. 402.2. Mem- 
bers, Wesley UMC, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

2646-MN-402-D Statement of Concern for 
the Rights of People. United Methodist students 
at Candler School of Theology. 

1549-MN-403-D Retain Par. 403. Members, 
Fairview UMC, Texarkana, Arkansas. 

458-MN-404-D Certified Candidate. SIN 
Committee for Ministry with Single Adults. 

525-MN-404-D Candidacy for Ordained 
Ministry. Gary L. Ball-Kilboume, NDK. 

719-MN-404-D The Inquiring Candidate. 
GBHM. 

720-MN-404-D The Inquiring Candidate. 
GCSW. 



56 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



721-MN-404-D Candidacy for Ordained 
Ministry. GBHM. 

892-MN-404-D The Certified Candidate. 
GCSW. 

1015-MN-404-D Retain Par. 404.4. WNC 
Board of Ordained Ministry, SGA delegation, + 
18 local churches and 8 individuals. 

1266-MN-404-D Retain Par. 404.4(e). AFL 
UMWEx. Com. and 3 Dist. UMW, + IB local 
churches and 2 individuals. 

1565-MN-404-D Retain Par. 404.2. UMW, 
Spring Hill Ave. UMC, Mobile, Alabama, + Ad. 
Councils, Scott- Memorial UMC, Eudora and 
UMC, Parkdale, and members, Fairview UMC, 
Texarkana, Arkansas. 

1634-MN-404-D Retain Par. 404. Ad. 
Boards, St. Francis St. UMC, Mobile, 
Alabama, Williston UMC, East Aurora, New 
York, First UMC, Clyde, Texas + Ad. Council, 
UMC, Williamstown, New Jersey. 

1968-MN-404-D Delete footnote for Par. 
404.4(e). Brian E. Carter, IWA + Alice Knotts, 
St. Paul UMC, Denver, Colorado. 

722-MN-405-D Continuation of Candidacy. 
GBHM. 

459-MN-406-D Terminating Category of 
Local Deacon/Elder. Paul B. Mitchell, KSE. 

723-MN-406-D Local Pastor. GBHM. 

1719-MN-406-D Amend Par. 406.4. CNV 
Board of World Ministries. 

2142-MN-406-D Part-time local pastors. 
Carl L. Pocock, UMC, Burton City, Ohio. 

724-MN-407-D License as a Local Pastor. 
GBHM. 

1969-MN-407-D License as a Local Pastor. 
National Federation of Asian American United, 
Methodists. 

460-MN-408-D Delete Par. 408.1c. Donna 
Hoover, Local Pastor, MOW. 

929-MN-408-D Standards for Ordained 
Ministry. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Stuttgart, Arkansas. 

1253-MN-408-D Local Pastors. LSA Board 
of Ordained Ministry. 

1853-MN-408-D Full-time Local Pastors. 
Stephen M. Martin, WNC, and Doris Wed- 
dington, Triplett UMC, Mooresville, North 
Carolina. 

1970-MN-408-D Rights of full-time local 
pastors. William E. Ballard, IWA + NC, NE, 
SE Jurisdiction, Town and Country Asso. + 
Nat. UM Rural Fellowship. 

1854-MN-409-D Amend Par. 409.1. CNV 
Board of World Ministries. 

725-MN-410-D Local Pastor. GBHM. 

1721-MN-410-D Sacrament and marriage 
privileges for retired minority local pastors. 
Ward D. Pierce, WMI + Michigan Area Indian 
Workers Conference. 

726-MN-411-D Counseling Elders. GBHM. 

65-MN-412-D Ministerial Membership. 
WYO. 

461-MN.412-D Local Pastors. Mark S. 
Womack, Local Pastor, HOL. 

930-MN-412-D General Provisions of Ad- 
mission and Continuance. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Stuttgart, Arkansas. 



1971-MN-412-D Ministerial Membership of 
the Annual Conference. William E. Ballard, 
IWA + NC and NE Junsdictional, Town and 
Country Asso. + Nat. UM Rural Fellowship. 

66-MN-413-D Probationary Membership. 
LVL. 

395-MN-414-D Qualifications for Election 
to Probationary Membership. GCRR. 

462-MN-414-D Qualifications for Proba- 
tionary Membership. SIN Committee for Min- 
istry with Single Adults. 

727-MN-414-D Qualifications for Election 
to Probationaiy Membership. GBHM. 

931-MN-414-D Eligibility for Probationary 
Membership. Administrative Board, First 
UMC, Stuttgart, Arkansas. 

1018-MN-414-D Qualifications for Election 
to Probationary Membership. SGA delegation. 

1386-MN-414-D Retain Par. 414.7. WNC 
Board of Ordained Ministry, + 12 local chur- 
ches and 3 individuals. 

2 143-MN-4 14-D Responsibility for payment 
of required exams. Administrative Board, First 
UMC, Hooks, Texas. 

533-MN-416-D Educational Requirements 
for Probationary Membership. CAP Board of 
Ordained Ministry. 

728-MN-416-D Special Conditions. GBHM. 

893-MN-416-D Special Conditions. Boston 
Area Asian Commission. 

1503-MN-416-D Amend Par. 416. FLA 
Board of Ordained Ministry, + Cabinet and 
Richard J. Wills Jr. 

1855-MN-416-D Amend Par. 416.2(b). 
Stephen M. Martin, WNC, and Doris Wed- 
dington, Triplett UMC, Mooresville, North 
Carolina. 

2619-MN-416-D Associate Members. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Rodney UMC, Rodney, 
Ohio. 

67-MN-417-D Continuation in Probation- 
ary Membership. WYO. 

1550-MN-417-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry Review. William A. Highfield, 
WYO. 

2144-MN-417-D Assignment of counselor. 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Legislative 
and Executive Committees. 

68-MN-418-D Associate Members. SIN, 
WVA. 

69-MN-418-D Associate Members. LVL, 
SIN, WVA, and Larry Ferguson, LRK. 

604-MN-418-D Eligibility of election of as- 
sociate members to General, Jurisdictional or 
Central Conferences. WVA + WOH Toledo 
District Town and Country, Association. 

923-MN-418-D Rights of Associate Mem- 
bers. 1987 Course of Study Student Council, 
Perkins School of Theology. 

1364-MN-418-D Eligibility and Rights of 
Associate Members. Nolan R. Williams, WMI. 

1973-MN-418-D Eligibility of associate 
members to be elected delegates. William E. 
Ballard, IWA + NC and NE Jurisdictional, 
Town and Country Asso. + Nat. UM Rural Fel- 
lowship. 

70.MN-419-D Associate Members. WYO. 



463-MN-419-D Associate Members. SIN 
Committee for Ministry with Single Adults. 

763-MN-419-D Requirements for Election 
as Associate Members. GBHM. 

932-MN-419-D Requirements for Election 
as Associate Members. Administrative Board, 
First UMC, Stuttgart, Arkansas. 

1020-MN-419-D Retain Par. 419. WNC 
Board of Ordained Ministry, SGA delegation, + 
10 local churches and 2 individuals. 

1430-MN-419-D Amend Par. 419. WPA 
Board of Ordained Ministry. 

1551-MN-419-D Education requirements 
for Associate Membership in an annual confer- 
ence. William A. Highfield, WYO. 

1722-MN-420-D Full member status for as- 
sociate members. Administrative Board, 
Lakewood UMC, Lake Odessa, Michigan. 

71-MN-422-D Rights of Full Members. 
HOL. 

464-MN-422-D Guaranteed Appointment. 
Denman E. Frazer, TEN. 

730-MN-422-D Rights of Full Members. 
GBHM. 

1857-MN-422-D Evaluation of a pastor's 
health by District Superintendents. Jerry Eck- 
ert, WIS. 

2145-MN-422-D Rights of fuU members. 
Opal C. Huettner, UMC, Markesan, Wisconsin. 

2146-MN-422-D Rights of Full Members. 
Administrative Board, Pilgrim UMC, St. John, 
Michigan. 

2147-MN-422-D Ministerial Moral Stan- 
dards. Members, First UMC, Welch, West Vir- 
ginia. 

72-MN-423-D Service Equivalency for 
Probationary Members. , CNV. 

465-MN-423-D Requirements for Admis- 
sion. SIN Committee for Ministry with Single 
Adults. 

534-MN-423-D Educational Requirements 
for Probationary Membership. CAP Board of 
Ordained Ministry. 

731-MN-423-D Requirements for Admis- 
sion. GBHM. 

1021-MN-423-D Retain Par. 423.6(g). 
WNC Board of Ordained Ministry, SGA delega- 
tion, + 9 local churches and 3 individuals. 

1574-MN-423-D Retain Par. 423.6. Mem- 
bers, First UMC, Prestonsburg, Kentucky, And 
Trinity UMC, Warner Robins, Georgia. 

1751-MN-423-D Age requirement for full 
membership. Shelton Spivey, Whaleyville 
UMC, Suffolk, Virginia. 

1974-MN-423-D Requiremente for admis- 
sion. John L. Clark, Edgewater UMC, 
Edgewater, Colorado. 

2 148-MN-423-D Responsibility for payment 
of required tests. Administrative Board, First 
UMC, Hooks, Texas. 

732-MN-424-D Examination for Admission 
into FuU Connection £md Associate Member- 
ship. GBHM. 

1086-MN-424-D Questions for Examining 
Candidates for Admission. Members, Grace 
UMC, Rochester, New York. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



57 



733-MN-425-D Ministers from Other An- 
nual Conferences and Other Methodist 
Denominations. GBHM. 

952-MN-425-D Ministers from Other An- 
nual Conferences and Other Methodist 
Denominations. GBPN. 

1425-MN-425-D Define and clarify Par. 
425.1. Robert B. Campbell, MOW. 

734-MN-426-D Transfers from Other 
Denominations. GBHM. 

1635-MN-426-D Transfers. Administrative 
Council, Clair Memorial UMC, Omaha, 
Nebraska 

73-MN-429-D Sacrament of Baptism. CIL. 

74-MN-429-D Act of Ordination. NDK, 
SGA + 156 local churches and 46 individuals. 

466-MN-430-D Qualifications for Ordina- 
tion. SIN Committee for Ministry with Single 
Adults. 

933-MN-430-D Qualifications for Ordina- 
tion. Administrative Board, First UMC, Stut- 
tgart, Arkansas. 

1022-MN-430-D Retain Par. 430.6. WNC 
Board of Ordained Ministry, SGA delegation, + 
27 local churches and 12 individuals. 

1636-MN-430-D Quahfications for Ordina- 
tion. Members, First UMC, Magnolia, Arkan- 
sas. 

75-MN-431-D Act of Ordination. CIL, SGA 
+ 1 VIR local church. 

467-MN-434-D Laying On of Hands. SAL. 

574-MN-434-D Ordination Service. GCCU 

1287-MN-434-D Ordination by the Whole 
Church. WIS delegation and Laity Council. 

1637-MN-435-D General Provisions. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Clair Memorial UMC, 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

2149-MN-435-D General Provisions. Galen 
Luebke,WIS. 

468-MN-436-D Senior Pastor. James L. 
Paulson, NIL. 

469-MN-436-D Appointment Process. J. 
Richard Ward, Christiana UMC, Christiana, 
Delaware. 

735-MN-436-D The Itinerant System. 
GBHM. 

1310-MN-43e-D Appointment of interim 
pastors. MOE Board of Ordained Ministry. 

1728-MN-436-D Appointment of interim 
pastors. MOE UM Rural Fellowship. 

1975-MN-436-D Appointment of Interim 
Pastors. William E. Ballard, IWA + 6 or 
ganizations. 

736-MN-437-D Definition of pastor 
GBHM. 

737-MN-438-D Responsibilities of a pastor. 
GBHM. 

1036-MN-438-D The Pastor. MUMC. 

76-MN-439-D Ministering within the Con 
gregation. NDK +176 local churches and 41 
individuals. 

77-MN-439-D Ministering within the Con 
gregation. WIS. 

78-MN-439-D Ministering within the Con 
gregation. NGA. 

738-MN-439-D Ministering Within the 
Congregation and the World. GBHM. 



739-MN-439-D Ministering Within the 
Congregation and the Worid. GBHM. 

934-MN-439-D Pastoral Counseling of 
Divorced Persons. ORI. 

2232-MN-439-D Pastoral responsibility for 
training lay leadership. Mort S. Cox, First 
UMC, Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

2233-MN-440-D Strengthen ministry of lay 
persons. Mort S. Cox, First UMC, Hot Springs, 
Arkansas. 

1068-MN-441-D Pastor's Reports to 
Charge Conference. Perry S. Miller, WNC. 

1752-MN-441-D Administration. Edwin 
Schell, BAL. 

2234-MN-441-D Pastoral accountability. 
Mort S. Cox, First UMC, Hot Springs, Arkan- 
sas. 

1575-MN-442-D Clergy Couples. Arthur M. 
0'NeilJr.,NGA 

470-MN-443-D Relation to Equalization of 
Lay and Ministerial Members. James G. 
Towler, SDA. 

754-MN-443-D Appointments Beyond the 
Local United Methodist Church. GBHM. 

755-MN-443-D Appointments Beyond the 
Local Church. GBHM. 

763-MN-443-D Working with Ministers. 
GBHM. 

1087-MN-443-D Charge Conference of Con- 
ference Members Appointed Beyond the Local 
Church. Glenn B. Kohlhepp, WPA. 

1267-MN-443-D AfTiliate Relation to a 
Local Church. Madge B. Floyd, WPA. 

1512-MN-443-D Amend Par. 443.1a. 
Thomas E. Frank, MOE. 

1856-MN-443-D Categories of appoint- 
ments beyond the local church. Charles W. 
Brockwell Jr., LVL + 11 other individuals. 

1976-MN-443-D Categories of appoint- 
ments beyond the local church. GCCU. 

2150-MN-443-D Celebrate ministry of per- 
sons appointed to serve beyond the local 
church. Frank S. Dunnewind, Bethlehem 
UMC, Franklin, Tennessee. 

740-MN-444-D Special Provisions. GBHM. 

1282-MN-444-D Rights of Full Members. 
Manuel V. Gaxiola, CNV. 

1311-MN-444-D Amend Par. 444. Robert 
M. Armstrong, Belle Isle UMC, Warners, New 
York. 

741-MN-445-D Evaluation. GBHM. 

1446-MN-445-D Evaluation. Richard T. 
Commander, NCA. 

743-MN-446-D Continuing Education. 
GBHM. 

742-MN-447-D Continuing Education. 
GBHM. 

1468-MN-447-D Educational Leave. Jack 
Riley, NMX. 

1534-MN-448-D$ Sabbatical Leaves. /. Mel- 
vilk Wohrley, EOH 

1312-MN-449-D Change of conference 
relationship. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

47 1.MN-450-D Charge Conference of Those 
on Leave of Absence. Paul B. Mitchell, KSE. 

744-MN-450-D Leave of Absence. GBHM. 

935-MN-450-D Ministerial Leave of Ab- 
sence. ORI. 



936-MN-450-D Leave of Absence. GBHM. 

953.MN-450.D Leave of Absence. GBPN. 

954-MN-450-D Leave of Absence. GBHM. 

1313-MN-450-D Right of Cabinets to in- 
itiate Leave of Absence. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1765-MN-450-D Leave of Absence. 
Leonard D. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2235-MN-450-D Leave of Absence. EarlR. 
Black, SIL. 

745-MN-451-D Maternity/Paternity Leave. 
GBHM. 

95S-MN-451-D Maternity/Paternity Leave. 
GBPN 

956-MN-452-D Disability Leave. GBPN. 

472-MN-453-D Mandatory Retirement. 
Administrative Board, Bethany UMC, 
Hampton, Virginia + D. A Baird, VIR. 

473-MN-453-D Membership of Retired 
Ministers. Donald C. Keck, NIL. 

474-MN-453-D Relation to Equalization of 
Lay and Ministerial Members. James G. 
Towler, SDA. 

746-MN-453-D Changes of Conference 
Relationship. GCSW. 

747-MN-453-D Appointment of Retired 
Ministers. GBHM. 

957-MN-453-D Retirement. GBPN. 

1283-MN-453-D Ministers-in-Residence. 
Manuel V. Gaxiola, CNV. 

1288-MN-453-D Mandatory Retirement. 
Jonnie T. Keith, Cascade UMC, Atlanta, Geor- 
gia. 

1411-MN-453-D Charge Conference mem- 
bership. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1412-MN-453-D Appointment of Retired 
Pastors. Administrative Council, Atwater 
UMC, Ahvater, Ohio. 

1521-MN-453-D Voluntary Retirement 
with 37 Years of Service or at Age 62. James A. 
Smith Jr., MNE. 

1858-MN-453-D EUminate mandatory 
retirement. Harold E. Walton, PEN. 

1977-MN-453-D Death Benefit Program. 
Donald A. Smith, First UMC, Marion, Indiana. 

1978-MN-453-D Rights of retired mini- 
sters. William R. Keeffe, NHA. 

1979-MN-453-D Appointment of retired 
ministers. Charles Dailey, EOH. 

2236-MN-453-D Retirement. Earl R. 
Black, SIL. 

2237-MN-453-D Retirement. Members, 
Metropolitan UMC, Detroit, Michigan. 

80-MN-454-D Honorable Location. SNE. 

475-MN-454-D Transfer of Credentials. 
PNW Clergy Executive Session. 

476-MN-454-D Option to Surrender of 
Credentials. Minnie Lee S. Lancaster, First 
UMC, Grapevine, Texas. 

729-MN-454-D Discontinuance from 
Probationary Membership. GBHM. 

748-MN-454-D Review Full and Associate 
Conference Membership. GBHM. 

749-MN-454-D Honorable Location. 
GBHM. 

750-MN-454-D Review of Full and Associate 
Conference Membership. GBHM. 



58 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



1314-MN-454-D Involuntajy discon- 
tinuance of ministers on probation. Jerry Eck 
erl, WIS. 

756-MN-455-D Grievance Procedures 
GBHM. 

958-MN-455-D Involuntary Termination 
Eugene Blair, WOH. 

1315-MN-455-D Involuntary termination 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1980-MN-455-D Regular evaluation of ef- 
fectiveness of pastors. 6 individuals in local 
churches, In Gulfport, Mississippi, Thomas 
ville, North Carolina, Washington, DC. 

2238-MN-455-D Involuntary Termination 
EarlR. Black, SIL. 

757-MN-457-D Readmission to Conference 
Relationship. GBHM. 

758-MN-458-D Readmission to Conference 
Relationship. GBHM. 

1859-MN-458-D Readmission after Sur- 
render of ministerial office. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

2151-MN-458-D Readmission after sur- 
render of the ministerial office. NAK Board of 
Ordained Ministry. 

89-MN-500-D Accountability of Bishops. 
WIS. 

478-MN-500-D Appointment of District Su- 
perintendents. Administrative Board, Christ 
UMC, Greenfield, Wisconsin. 

767-MN-500-D Renewal Leave. GBHM. 

1251-MN-500-D Qualifications for the epis- 
copal office. Kenneth W. Chalker, EOH. 

1475-MN-500-D Office of Administrative 
Assistant to the Bishop. William R. Johnson, 
NDK. 

382-MN-501-D Presiding Elder. SCA. 

1316-MN-501-D Calling on superinten- 
dents to demonstrate love of God and neighbor. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1981-MN-501-D Bishops as chief executive 
officers. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Montrose, Colorado. 

396-MN-502-D Inclusiveness. GCRR. 

1317-MN-504-D Calling on bishops and su- 
perintendents to demonstrate love of God and 
neighbor. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

477-MN-509-D Retirement of Bishops. 
Keith D. Davis, NIN. 

759-MN-509-D Termination of Office. 
GBHM. 

959-MN-509-D Voluntary Retirement. CC 
Executive Committee. 

1130-MN-509-D Retirement of Bishops. 
GCFA 

1131-MN-509-D Retirement of Bishops. 
GCFA. 

1766-MN-509-D Retirement Age for 
Bishops. Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, 
Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

1767-MN-509-D Rights of a retired bishop. 
Leonardo. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1861-MN-509-D Retirement of bishops. 
Members, Swaim Memorial UMC, Jackson- 
ville, Florida. 

760-MN-510-D Status of Retired Bishops. 
GBHM. 



901-MN-510-D Authority of a Retired 
Bishop to preside over a Conference. GCFA. 

761-MN-511-D Renewal Leave. GBHM. 

902-MN-511-D Remuneration of a Bishop 
on Sabbatical Leave. GCFA. 

1984-MN-511-D Renewal Leave. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Trinity UMC, Jensen 
Beach, Florida. 

536-MN-512-D Consecration of Bishops. 
GCCU 

762-MN-513-D Disposition of Complaint. 
GBHM. 

1768-MN-513-D Review Committee. 
Western Jurisdiction Committee on Episcopacy. 

2239-MN-513-D Sabbatical Leave following 
complaint. Victor Goldschmidt, St. Andrew 
UMC, West Lafayette, + P. Robin Smith, Faith 
UMC, Logansport, Indiana. 

1536-MN-514-D Responsibilities of 
bishops. /. Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

1577-MN-514-D ResponsibiUties of 
bishops. Richard T. Commander, NCA. 

2153-MN-514-D Leadership of Council of 
Bishops. Howard L. Lydick, First UMC, 
Richardson, Texas. 

575-MN-515-D Presidential Duties. 
GBGM. 

1985-MN-515-D Presidential Duties. 
Western Jurisdiction College of Bishops. 

1447-MN-516-D ResponsibiUties of 
bishops. Richard T Commander, NCA. 

1638-MN-516-D Working with Ministers. 
Administrative Council, Clair Memorial UMC, 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

1986-MN-516-D Working with ministers. 
Richard T. Commander, NCA, and Lelia S. 
Commander, Carrboro UMC, Carrboro, North 
Carolina. 

2154-MN-516-D Responsibihties of 
bishops. KSE Cabinet, Boards ofDiaconal and 
Ordained Ministry. 

1318-MN-517-D Election of District Super- 
intendents. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1330-MN-517-D Selection and Assignment 
of District Superintendents. Lester L. Moore, 
IWA 

1862-MN-517-D Appointment of District 
Superintendent. Members, Asbury UMC, 
Prairie Village, Kansas. 

87-MN-518-D Limitation on Years of Ser- 
vice. SNE. 

1268-MN-518-D Limitations of Years of 
Service. Madge B. Floyd, WPA 

88-MN-519-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendent. NGA. 

397-MN-519-D Commitment to Inclusive- 
ness. GCRR. 

479-MN-5 19-D Supervision of Mission Site. 
Ramona Kramer, UMC, Prairie du Sac, Wis- 
consin. 

764-MN-519-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendents. GBHM. 

480-MN-520-D Supervision Respon- 
sibilities. Ramona Kramer, UMC, Prairie du 
Sac, Wisconsin. 

765-MN-520-D Supervision. GBHM. 



1578-MN-520-D Responsibilities of district 
superintendents. Aleta Catron, First UMC, 
Huntsville, Alabama. 

1863-MN-620-D Supervision. Members, 
Asbury UMC, Prairie Village, Kansas. 

2240-MN-520-D Supervision. MortS. Cox, 
First UMC, Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

398-MN-521-D Handicapping Condition. 
GCRR. 

766-MN-521-D Personnel. GBHM. 

1013-MN.521-D Personnel. ORI Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. 

1579-MN-521-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendents. Richard T. Commander, 
NCA. 

2155-MN-521-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendents. KSE Cabinet, Boards of 
Diaconal and Ordained Ministry. 

2156-MN-522-D Responsibihties of District 
Superintendents. KSE Boards ofDiaconal and 
Ordained Ministry. 

2656-MN-522-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendents. KSE Cabinet. 

481-MN-523-D Audit of District Monies. 
Jim Beal, NAK. 

1987-MN-523-D Delete Par. 523.1. Darrel 
Loar, WOH. 

399-MN-524-D Ecumenical and Racial In- 
clusiveness. GCRR. 

1319-MN-524-D Non-personal respon- 
sibilities of District Superintendents. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

2157-MN-524-D Program responsibilities 
of District Superintendents. National United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Legislative and 
Executive Committees. 

1291-MN-526-D Responsibilities of District 
Superintendents. Wendell A. Meggs, TEN. 

1109-MN-528-D Conference Council 
Director's Relationship to Cabinet. GCOM. 

1320-MN-528-D AccountabiUty of District 
Superintendents. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1988-MN-529-D Appointment-making. 7 
individuals in local churches, Baltimore, 
Maryland, Gulfport, Mississippi, Thomasville, 
North Carolina, Washington, DC. 

90-MN-530-D Consultation and Appoint- 
ment-Making. SIL. 

576-MN-530-D Process of consultation. 
SIN. 

769-MN-530-D Consultation and Appoint- 
ment-Making. GBHM. 

1448-MN-530-D Consultation process. 
Richard T. Commander, NCA. 

770-MN-531-D Criteria. GBHM. 

937-MN-531-D Criteria for Pastors. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Stuttgart, 
Arkansas. 

1989-MN-531-D Appointment-making 
Charles Dailey, EOH. 

1990-MN-531-D Appointment-making 
Native American International Caucus. 

2241-MN-531-D Tenure of Appointmente. 
Robert J. Dexter, NIN ■^ 2 other individuals. 

482-MN-532-D Process of Appointment 
Making Gene A. Norris, SCA 

677-MN-632-D Process of consultation 
SIN. 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



59 



924-MN-532-D Process of Appointment- 
Making. Members, First UMC, Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. 

1321-MN-532-D Initiating a change of ap- 
pointment. John B. Moore, Western Reserve 
UMC, Salem, Ohio. 

1322-MN-532-D Consultation Process. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1991-MN-532-D Appointment-making 
process. 5 individuals in local churches, 
Gulfport, Mississippi, Thomasville, North 
Carolina, Washington, DC. 

2158-MN-532-D Ecumenically-related ap- 
pointments. National United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Legislative and Executive Commit- 
tees. 

2 159-MN-532-D Appointment-making. 
KSE Boards ofDiaconal and Ordained Mini- 
stry. 

2628-MN-532-D Appointment-making 
process. Paul Wesley, LSA + 3 other in- 
dividuals. 

1992-MN-533-D Appointment-making in 
cooperative parishes. Claudia G. Harrelson, 
WNC. 

1993-MN-533-D Extending the length of ap- 
pointments to charges and churches. William 
E. Ballard, IWA + 4 organizations. 

777-MN-633-D Joint Jurisdictional Com- 
mittee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry. 
GBHM. 

120-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. IWA. 

121-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dfiined Ministry. SIN. 

122-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. WYO. 

123-MN.732-P Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. LSA. 

162-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. NIN 

173-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. RIO. 

404-MN-732-D Recruitment of Ordained 
Clergy. GCRR. 

405-MN-732-D Ethnic Minority and Lan- 
guage Training. GCRR. 

793-MN-732-D Lay Observers. GBOD. 

794-MN-732-D Duties of Annual Con- 
ference Board of Ordained Ministry. GBHM. 

795-MN-732-D Duties of Annual Con- 
ference Board of Ordained Ministry. GBHM. 

796-MN-732-D Records and files of Con- 
ference Board of Ordained Ministry. GBHM. 

938-MN-732-D Lay Membership on the 
Conference Board of Ordained Ministry. ORI. 

1323-MN-732-D Nomination of Board of 
Ordained Ministry. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

1371-MN-732-D Clergy Membership. IWA 
Board of Ordained Ministry. 

1555-MN-732-D Conference Board of Or- 
dained Ministry Review. William A. Highfield, 
WYO. 

1734-MN-732-D Lay Observers. Pauline 
Niks, Green Trails UMC, Chesterfield, Mis- 
souri. 



1780-MN-732-D Membership of Board of 
Ordained Ministry. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2020-MN-732-D Recording change of mem- 
bership status. Michael W. Walker, NTX. 

2021-MN-732-D Duties of Conference 
Board of Ordained Ministry. William E. Bal- 
lard, IWA + 5 organizations and 2 local chur- 
ches. 

2176-MN-732-D Retain Par. 732.1. NAK 
Board of Ordained Ministry. 

2177-MN-732-D Board of Ordained Mini- 
stry. W. R. Obaugh and Edward W. Paup, 
RKM, + 4 other individuals. 

2178.MN-732-D Duties of Board of Or- 
dained Ministry. Kenneth S. Calhoun, TEX. 

2253-MN-732-D Funds for Conference 
Board of Ordained Ministry. Victor 
Goldschmidt, St. Andrew UMC, West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

2254-MN-732-D Responsibilities of Con- 
ference Board of Ordained Ministry. Mort S. 
Cox, First UMC, Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

2255-MN-732-D Membership of Conference 
Board of Ordained Ministry. National Associa- 
tion, Annual Conference Lay Leaders. 

406-MN-733-D Recruitment for Diaconal 
Ministry. GCRR. 

582-MN-733-D Conference Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. GBGM. 

797-MN-733-D Conference Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. GBHM. 

798-MN-733-D Duties of Conference Board 
of Diaconal Ministry. GBHM. 

1584-MN-733-D Recertification require- 
ments. Board of Directors, Christian 
Educators Fellowship, + VIR Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. 

2179-MN-733-D Responsibilities of Board 
of Diaconal Ministry. KSE Cabinet, Boards of 
Diaconal and Ordained Ministry. 

124-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. SIN. 

125-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. PNW. 

172-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. RIO. 

1112-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. GCOM. 

1452-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. Richard T. Commander, NCA. 

2022-MN-734-D Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. Robert I. Phelps, YEL. 

801-MN-749-D District Committee on Or- 
dained Ministry. GBHM. 

939-MN-749-D Lay Membership on District 
Committee on Ordained Ministry. ORI 

1785-MN-749-D Membership of District 
Committee on Ordained Ministry. Leonard D. 
Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

2027-MN-749-D Responsibilities of District 
Committee on Ordained Ministry. William E. 
Ballard, IWA + NC, NE, SE Jurisdiction, 
Town and Country Asso. + Nat. UM Rural Fel- 
lowship. 

133-MN-751-D Committee on District Su- 
perintendency. PNW. 



802-MN-751-D Purpose of Committee on 
District Superintendency. GBHM. 

1538-MN-751-D Committee on District Su- 
perintendency. /. Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

1589-MN-1526-D Certification in youth 
ministries. DSW Council on Youth Ministries. 

2056-MN-1529-D Responsibilities of 
Division of Ordained Ministry. Gregory D. 
Stover, WOH 

2194-MN-1529-D Responsibilities of 
Division of Ordained Ministry. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Plymouth, Michigan. 

483-MN-3000-R$ Disabled for Itineracy. 
PNW. 

484-MN-3000-R$ Council of Bishops Initia- 
tives. CAP, nVA, NYK. PEN, RIO, WNC. 

485-MN-3000-R$ Central Clearing Agency 
for Clergy Transfers. NIL. 

486-MN-3000-R$ In-Depth Study of 
U.S./U.S.S.R. Relations. , PNW. 

488-MN-3000-R Further studies of minis- 
try or diaconate. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

490-MN-3000-R Appointment Process. 
Mary Ellen Corder, Reger Chapel UMC, Buck- 
hannon. West Virginia. 

491-MN-3000-R Accepted Name for Triune 
God. NIN and William C. Mason, OKL. 

492-MN-3000-R Standardized Salaries. 
Odie Gregg, NAL. 

493-MN-3000-R Administering the Sacra- 
ment of Holy Communion. J. David Roberts, 
Oakdale Emory UMC, Olney, Maryland. 

632-MN-3000-R Status of self-avowed 
homosexuals. Congregational meeting. 
Parkview UMC, Miamisburg, Ohio. 

662-MN-3000-R Terminology in the Book of 
Discipline. GBOD, MEM, + National Asso. of 
Annual Conference Lay Leaders. 

948-MN-3000-R Retain position on 
Homosexuality. SE Juris. BOMs, KEN 
Cabinet, WNCBCS, + 94 local churches and 18 
individuals. 

1014-MN-3000-R Membership of clergy of 
other denominations serving cooperative or 
united churches. Council, St. John UM-Pres- 
byterian (USA) Church, Columbia, Maryland. 

1017-MN-3000-R The Church and Its Min- 
istry. CSMN. 

1019-MN-3000-R$ Recommendations from 
the Commission for the Study of Ministry. 
CSMN. 

1030-MN-3000-R Ordination and appoint- 
ment of homosexuals to ministry or positions 
of leadership in UMC. Church Conference, 
First UMC, Atlanta, Texas. 

1067-MN-3000-R Eligibility for election and 
ordination as elders. M. Thos. Swantner and 
John C. Wilkey, CIL. 

1084-MN-3000-R$ Alternative recommen- 
dations in response to Report of the Commis- 
sion for the Study of Ministry. Council of 
Bishops. 

1255-MN-3000-R Extending the Right of 
Administering Communion. FIF. 

1272-MN-3000-R Against ordination and 
appointment of homosexuals and lesbians. 



60 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 26, 1988 



Calvin B. Johnson, VIR + 2 local churches and 
1 individual. 

1273-MN-3000-R Marriages of 

Homosexuals and Lesbians. Calvin B. Johnson 
andRufusE. O'Quinn. VIR. 

1331-MN-3000-R Homosexuals in the 
church. Administrative Boards, Asbury and 
Haught Chapel UMC + members, Wesley UMC, 
Fairview, West Virginia. 

1394-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Crawford, Carey, Ohio. 

1395-MN-3000-R Against ordination of 
practicing homosexuals. Administrative Coun- 
cil, Trinity UMC, Alexandria, Louisiana. 

1396-MN-3000-R Enforcement of Par. 
402.2. Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

1397-MN-3000-R Enforcement of Par. 
402.2. Church Conference, Paradise Hills 
UMC, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

1398-MN-3000-R Consultation Process. 
Watford Reed, Lincoln Street UMC, Portland, 
Oregon. 

1400-MN-3000-R Take stronger stand on 
homosexuality. William B. Thielking, SNJ + 
3 local churches and 1 other individual. 

1401-MN-3000-R Diaconal Ministers. Wat- 
ford Reed, Lincoln Street UMC, Portland, 
Oregon. 

1508-MN-3000-R Against ordination of 
homosexuals. Members, 10 local groups, in 
Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, New Jersey, 
New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Texas, West Vir- 
ginia. 

1532-MN-3000-R Uphold Par. 402.2. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Gardnertown UMC, New- 
burgh, New York. 

1563-MN-3000-R Accept truth of Scripture. 
AlbertaBrown, First UMC, Williamstown, West 
Virginia. 

1564-MN-3000-R Value seriously the feel- 
ings of the people at the grass roots of the 
Church. Administrative Board, Forrest Bur- 
dette UMC, Hurricane, West Virginia. 

1567-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Harrison Chapel UMC, 
Killen, Alabama 

1712-MN-3000-R Recognize members of 
Mission Society for United Methodists for ap- 
pointments beyond local church. Robert D. 
Snyder, EOH + UMW, St. Mark's UMC, 
Raleigh, North Carolina and 2 local churches. 

1713-MN-3000-R Clarify Julian Rush issue. 
Sharon A. Hardman, WOH and Matthew W. 
Hardman, Union Furnace UMC, Logan, Ohio. 

1714-MN-3000-R Responsibilities of 
bishops. Administrative Council, Pleasant 
Ridge UMC, Middletown, Ohio. 

1716-MN-3000-R Retain wording in Dis- 
cipline regarding homosexuality and diversity 
in ministry. AFL Pensacola District United 
Methodist Women. 

1720-MN-3000-R Against ordination or ap- 
pointment of practicing homosexuals. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Waterville UMC, 
Waterville, Ohio. 

1723-MN-3000-R Against homosexuals in 
all phases of Christian ministry within the 



UMC. Administrative Council, UMC, Pember- 
ton. New Jersey. 

1724-MN-3000-R Recognize Mission 
Society for United Methodists for appoint- 
ments beyond the local church. Arthur R. Kirk, 
EOH + 2 local churches. 

2509-MN-3000-R Administering the Lord's 
Supper. Juhani Pielarinen, FIF + 2 other in- 
dividuals. 

2669-MN-3000-R Appointment-making. 
Beverly Perkins, Grace UMC, Gallipolis, Ohio. 

2571-MN-3000-R Orders of Deacon and 
Elder. Kent Marrs, CTX. 

2572-MN-3000-R Status of National Fel 
lowship of Associate Members and Local Pas 
tors of The United Methodist Church 
Administrative Council, Rodney UMC, Rodney, 
Ohio. 

2573-MN-3000-R Status of Diaconal Mini 
sters. National Association, Annual Con- 
ference Lay Leaders. 

2574-MN-30O0-R National appointment 
system for Native American pastors. Native 
American International Caucus. 

2575-MN-3000-R Order of Deacon. Mem- 
bers, Corinth UMC, Cunningham, Kentucky. 

2576-MN-3000-R Baptism. Young Adult 
Sunday School Class, Corinth UMC, Cunnin- 
gham, Kentucky. 

2577-MN-3000-R$ Development of a com- 
prehensive approach to Native American min- 
istries. Native American International Caucus. 

2578-MN-3000-R Appointment-making. 
James Albert Trickett, LSA. 

2579-MN-3000-R$ National Consultation 
on Pastoral Care for Native Americans. Native 
American International Caucus. 

2580-MN-3000-R$ National Convocation 
on the Ordained Ministry for Native 
Americans. Native American International 
Caucus. 

2581-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem- 
bers, Fourth Street UMC, Aurora, First UMCs, 
LaGrange and McHenry, Illinois. 

2582-MN-3000-R Committees for Goodwill 
Industries of America, Inc. Howard C. Neefe, 
ML Tabor UMC, North Canton, Ohio. 

2583-MN-3000-R Second baptism. Mem- 
bers, Massac UMC, Paducah, Kentucky. 

2584-MN-3000-R Baptism. Juhani 

Pietarinen, FIF + 2 other individuals. 

2586-MN-3000-R Enforcement of Par. 
402.2. Members, Parker UMC, Panama City, 
Florida 

2587-MN-3000-R Diaconal ministry terms. 
Carol Iwerks, First UMC, Aberdeen, North 



2588-MN-3000-R$ Enforcement of prohibi- 
tion regarding homosexuality. James 
Woodrum, Westbury UMC, Houston, Texas. 

2590-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Wesley Chapel UMC, Rus- 
ton, Louisiana. 

259 1-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. J. S. and 
Margaret Edwards, First UMC, SUUon, Texas. 

2592-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Washington Avenue UMC, 
Columbus, Ohio. 



2593-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Newtonsville UMC, New- 
tonsville, Ohio. 

2594-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad 
ministrative Boards, Grace UMC, Des Moines, 
and First UMC, Raton, New Mexico. 

2595-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Dannie 
B. Hooker, UMC, Leachville, Arkansas. 

2596-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Juhan 
Pietarinen, FIF + 2 other individuals. 

2597-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers, Corinth UMC, Cunningham, Kentucky. 

2598-MN-3000-R Homosexuality, Chargt 
Conference, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, 
Maryland. 

2599-MN-3000-R Enforce present position 
on homosexuality. Members, UMCs, Car- 
dington and Waldo, Ohio. 

2600-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers. Hickory Ridge-Tilton Charge, Hickory 
Ridge, Arkansas. 

2601-MN-3000-R HomosexuaUty. Mem- 
bers, Marysville UMC, Marysville, Arkansas. 

2602-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers. Beagle UMC, Osawatomie, Kansas. 

2603-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad 
ministrative Board, Friendship UMC, Arkadel- 
phia, Arkansas. 

2604-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers, Gnadenhutten UMC, Gnadenhutten, 
Ohio. 

2605-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Victor R 
Trussell, Asbury UMC, Lubbock, Texas. 

2606-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers, SL Paul UMC, Midland, Texas. 

2607-MN-3000-R HomosexuaUty, Ad 
ministrative Board, Salem UMC, Keedysville, 
Maryland. 

2608-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad 
ministrative Council, Randolph UMC, Ran 
dolph, Kansas. 

2609-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Trinity UMC, Logan, Ohio. 

2610-MN-30O0-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Garrett UMC, Garrett, In 
diaruL 

2611-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers. Lake UMC, Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

2612-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, First UMC, Houston, 
Texas. 

2613-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers, Burgoon UMC, Burgoon, Ohio. 

2614-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem 
bers, Salem UMC, Salem, Kentucky. 

2615-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Maxine 
Manering, Ashford UMC, Houston, Texas. 

2616-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Rondel 
E. and Catherine R. Wilkinson, Steele Memorial 
UMC, Barbourville, West Virginia 

2617-MN-300O-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Washington UMC, Stras- 
burg, Illinois. 

2618-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Nancy J. 
Smith, Waterville UMC, Waterville, Ohio. 

2620-MN-30O0-R Homosexuality. Ad- 
ministrative Board, Trinity UMC, Opelika, 
Alabama 



April 26, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



61 



2621-MN-3000-R HomosexuaUty. Ad- 
ministrative Council, Middleburg UMC, Mid- 
dleburg, Ohio. 

2622-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Dennis 
L. McOwen, York UMC, Medina, Ohio. 

2623-MN-3000-R The Ordained Ministry. 
NGA LaGrange District Ministers Meeting, + 
14 local churches and 1 individual. 

2624-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem- 
bers, Orangeburg UMC, Maysville, Kentucky. 

2625-MN-3000-R Homosexuality. Mem- 
bers, Hawley Memorial UMC, Pine Bluff, 
Arkansas. 



2626-MN-3000-R Homosexuality and the 
Church. Joseph H. Garrett, First UMC, Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

2632-MN-3000-R Clergy spouses. DeeAnne 
Henke, UMC, Trenton, Missouri. 

2637-MN-3000-R$ Foundational Courses. 
Alice M. Trost, Chnst UMC, Troy, New York. 

2638-MN-3000-R Clergy spouses. DeeAnne 
Henke, UMC, Trenton, Missouri. 

265S-MN-3000-R Recruitment of Native 
American Clergy. Native American Interna- 
tional Caucus. 

487-MN-3000-S$ Theological Perspective 
in Dealing with A.I.D.S. PNW. 



489-MN-3000-S$ Diaconal Ministry. MEM, 
SIL. 

949-MN-3000-S$ Study of Term Epis- 
copacy. ORI and National UM Rural Fellow- 
ship, NC Juris. + Vf OH Toledo Dist. Town and 
Country Asso. 

1547-MN-3000^$ Study of Par. 453.1. /. 
Melville Wohrley, EOH. 

1715-MN-3000-S$ Task Force on 
Homosexuality and the Church. GailMcClain, 
Covenant UMC, Rochester, New York. 

1717-MN-3000-S$ Design system to im- 
prove process for pastoral changes. H. B. Pas- 
ley, Dunton UMC, Gaffney, South Carolina. 



xm/i 




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THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Vol. VII 



St. Louis, Missouri, Wednesday, April 27, 1988 



No. 2 



Delegates Exhorted to Seek Identity and Unity 



United Methodists should face the 2 1st 
century with confidence, their chief pas- 
tors declared Tuesday night as clergy and 
laity, gathered from around the globe in 
the Gateway City, opened the 1988 
General Conference. 

"If anything is clear at this moment of 
history, it is that God has momentous 
things in mind for the people called 
United Methodists," Bishop Jack M. 
Tuell of Los Angeles said in the tradition- 
al "state of the church" Episcopal Ad- 
dress. He called on the 996 delegates, and 
the approximately 9.7 million people 
they represent in the United States, 
Africa, Europe and the Philippines, to 
address themselves "to some basic ques- 
tions of identity and direction" in the 
days and years ahead. (See text of ad- 
dress on page 78). 



Agenda 

Wednesday, April 27 

9:00 a.m. Laity Address 

9:30 a.m. UM Publishing House Gift 

9:35 a.m. Old John Street UMC 
Board of Trustees 

9:40 a.m. Election Inter-jurisdiction- 
al Committee on Episcopacy 

9:45 a.m. Committee Plan of Or- 
ganization & Rules of Order 

10:15 a.m. Test Voting Equipment 

10.20 a.m. Agenda for Thursday, 
April 28 

10:22 a.m. Adjournment to Legisla- 
tive Sessions 
12:30 p.m. Lunch 

2:30-5:00 p.m. Legislative Commit- 
tees 
7:30 p.m. Legislative Committees 



Bishop Tuell's address, given on behalf 
of the church's Council of Bishops, was 
a major feature of the first day of the 
quadrennial session that will continue 
through May 6 in the Cervantes Conven- 
tion Center. 

A liturgical procession of almost 100 
bishops, a sermon by Bishop Earl G. 
Hunt Jr. of Florida, and a celebration of 
Holy Communion attended by an es- 
timated 3,000 persons, opened the con- 
ference. The procession of episcopal 
leaders presented several firsts, for 
United Methodism in the United States, 
including the first black woman bishop, 
the first Hispanic-American bishop, and 
the fu-st Japanese-American bishop. 

Seated before a brillant blue back- 
ground with crimson and white accents, 
the worshippers joined in a service draw- 
ing extensively from the proposed new 
hymnal and worship book that will come 
before the delegates later in the session 
for approval as the denomination's offi- 
cial volume. 

In his sermon. Bishop Hunt, outgoing 
president of the Council of Bishops, said 
that "we would do well to remember that, 
in Wesleyan religion, social conscience 
and courage must spring from a saving 
awareness of God in Jesus Christ, other- 
wise they are impermanent and 
dangerous." The church, he continued 
"dare not erect a constantly expanding 
superstructure of social activism upon a 
steadily diminishing foundation of 
religious faith." 

As the eucharistic liturgy continued, 
the bishops distributed the cup and loaf 
to 100 clergy from the St. Louis area who 
then joined in serving the delegates and 
visitors. 

Bishop Forrest C. Stith, Syracuse, 
N.Y., was liturgist for the service, and 
Bishop Ernest T. Dixon, San Antonio, 
Texas, incoming Council president, was 
celebrant. Bishop Rueben P. Job, Des 
Moines, Iowa, is coordinator of worship 
for the 1988 General Conference. 




Music was 
provided by the 
choir of St. 
Mark's United 
Methodist 
Church in New 
York City, the St. 
Louis Brass En- 
semble., and or- 
ganist Charles 
H. Webb, Dean 
of the School of 
Music at Indiana 
University and a 
member of the 
Hymnal Revision Committee. The Rev. 
Carlton R. Young is music director for 
the conference. 

Once the worship was concluded, 
delegates began the first legislative ses- 
sion and ran into what undoubtedly will 
be one of many procedural snags. Tests 
of a brand-new electronic voting system 
turned up about 100 fewer votes being 
recorded than the 964 delegates reported 
as registered. Conference Business 
Manager DeWayne Woodring promised 
that the system would be rechecked and, 
with good-natured chuckles, the 
delegates reverted to the famUiar raising 
of hands for the remainder of the after- 
noon. 

Another electronic innovation was 
more successful. Two large screens 
flanked the platform and carried close- 
up television pictures of speakers and 
other participants. 

Monday night the delegates attended 
the traditional reception for bishops that 
was cast by the Missouri hosts as a 
reenactment of the famed 1904 St. Louis 
World's Fair, complete with jazz band, 
carousel and calliope. 

Wednesday, the conference will listen 
to the Laity Address at 9 a.m. and then 
begin what is expected to be a week's 
worth of legislative committee meetings. 

-Robert Lear 



66 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



General Conference Opens! 



Months of planning in St. Louis and elsewhere 
culminated April 25 as final preparations were 
made for several thousand visitors and 
delegates to the 1988 General Confernce. 
Photos on this page are but a small sampling 
of the activity around the Cervantes Conven- 
tion Center as displays, books, equipment and 
supplies were unloaded. Scenes on the op- 
posite page include arrival of delegates at St. 
Louis' Lambert Field and at the convention 
center. Monday evening attendees enjoyed 
the traditional -Bishops' Reception which 
employed a 1904 World's Fair theme. Fea- 
tures included a mime troupe, an old- 
fashioned pocorn wagon and host Bishop W. 
T. Handy attired in turn-of-the-century garb. 

(PHOTOS BY RALPH BAKER, LAYOUT BY JAMES 

STEELE) 





asajrf 





^r lov)^'' 



Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference of 
the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 
published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist Publishing 
House, P.O. Box 801, Nashville, TN 
37202. 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
Display in Civic Center Exhibition Hall. 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Bette Prestwood Associate Editor 

Sheila W. McGee Managing Editor 

AndrewMiller Business Manager 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Meredith Danaher Calendar & Proceedings Editor 

Richard Street Composition Manager 

News & Features 

Mike Cunningham Composition Manager 

Calendar & Proceedings 

Barbara J. Wyno Assistant Composition Manager 

James Steele News/Roundup Manager 

Kathy Kruger Assistant News Editor 

Crys Zinkiewicz Chief Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg Assistant Copy Editor 

Cindy Solomon Assistant Copy Editor 

Louise McEowen Assistant Copy Editor 

Jane M. Schwara Assistant Copy Editor 

Vivian Mitchell Secretarial Pool Manager 

Angela R. Butler Secretary 

Mochell Anderson Secretary 



Bradford L. Motta Feature Editor 

Glenn Hinton Index Editor 

Thelma Boeder Assistant Index Editor 

John Goodwin Photographer 

JuanitaBellenfant Sales Manager 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Joyce Wolf Circulation Manager 

Robert K Feaster Publisher 



Subscriptions: Daily Reports (binder included) 
J34.50 if picked up at the DCA booth (final issues 
mailed 1st class); $57.50 maileddaily from St. Louis 
by 1st class mail; $46.00 mailed after General Con- 
ference. Individual copies $3.00 each at DCA booth. 
Roundup Edition (one copy included in Daily 
Reports 8ubscription),ten or more to one address, 
$1 each; Single copies, $2 each. Sets mailed after 
Conference: Advance Editions Workbook, $17.50; 
Bound Volumes: Advance Editions Workbook and 
Daily Reports, $126 a set (mailed in August). 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 




DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 




Participating in today's worship service will be the West Ohio United Methodist Ministers Choir. The choir, formed in 1948 to provide musical leader- 
ship for the daily worship services of the Annual Conference sessions, consists of 57 pastors who serve throughout the Conference. The choir gives 
several concerts each year in churches throughout Ohio. During the past ten years the choir has traveled to England and Western Europe twice as 
well as the United States. Carol Ann Bradley, in her sixth year as director, is Diaconal Minister of Music at North Broadway United Methodist Church 
in Columbus, Ohio. 

Morning, afternoon worship services to begin today 



Bishop James M. Ault and the Rev. 
Zan W. Holmes, Jr. will be today's 
General Conference preachers. Bishop 
Ault will preach during the 8:30 a.m. ser- 
vice in Cervantes Convention Center. 
Dr. Holmes will preach at 2:30 p.m. at St. 
Patrick's Catholic Church. 

Episcopal leader of the Pittsburg Area 
since 1980, Bishop Ault moved there 
from the Philadelphia Area where he 
was assigned after his election to the 
episcopacy in 1972. 

When elected, Bishop Ault was dean 
and professor of pastoral theology at 
Drew University School of Theology in 
Madison, N.J. Before that he was a pas- 
tor in New York, New Jersey and Mas- 
sachusetts and on the faculty of Union 
Theological Seminary in New York City. 

Bishop Ault presided over the Council 
ofBishops from April 1986 to April 1987. 
In March, he completed four years as 
president of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. He is a member of the Central 
Committee of the World Council of 
Churches and the executive committee 
of the World Methodist Council. 

A native of Sayre, Pa., Bishop Ault 
graduated from Colgate University and 
Union Theological Seminary. He has 
also studied in Scotland. 

Bishop Ault and his wife, Dorothy, are 
the parents of three grown children. 

Dr. Holmes, chairperson of the North 
Texas delegation to the General Con- 
ference, will be the preacher for the first 
of eight afternoon services. These will 



be at 2:30 p.m. each day of General Con- 
ference except Sunday, May 1, and 
Friday, May 6. 

Senior pastor of St. Luke Community 
United Methodist Church in Dallas, 
Texas, he has also been associate profes- 
sor of preaching at Perkins School of 
Theology at Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity in Dallas since 1978. 

Dr. Holmes began his pastoral career 
at Hamilton Park UMC in Dallas. He has 
been a district superintendent, served in 
the Texas Legislature and been associate 
director of the Perkins intern program. 
He recently was a visiting professor at 
Garrett Evangelical Theological Semi- 
nary, Evanston, 111. 

Author of several books and publica- 
tions, he narrated the video portion of 
the DISCIPLE Bible study. 

Raised in Austin, Texas, Dr. Holmes 
graduated from Houston-Tillotson Col- 
lege in Austin and SMU. He received an 
honorary doctor of divinity from Hous- 
ton-Tillotson. 

Liturgist for the afternoon service will 
be U.S. Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D.-Ind.). 
A layspeaker and active member of First 
UMC, Columbus, Ind., he worships at 
Foundry Church when in Washington, 
D.C. 

Rep. Hamilton chaired the House 
Select Committee investigating the Iran- 
Contra arms transactions. He was 
recognized for his fairness and concise 
summary satements. 



A graduate of DePauw University, 
Rep. Hamilton was raised in a Methodist 
parsonage. His brother is the Rev. 
Richard Hamilton, prominent senior 
pastor of North UMC in Indianapolis. 

Announcements 

The delegates' lounge will be open for 
cookies and conversation, daily 8 a.m. - 8 
p.m. Northwest corner of Hall A (ad- 
jacent to Cokesbury). You are invited. 

The Portland Area (Oregon-Idaho 
Conference and Alaska) delegates, reser- 
ves and guests will meet for dinner at 6:00 
p.m. on Wednesday, May 4th at Walter's 
Restaurant in the St. Louis Center. 
Honored guest will be Bishop Calvin Mc- 
Connell. 

Saturday night, April 30, 8 p.m. at Cen- 
tenary United Methodist Church, 
Methodist Federation for Social Action is 
sponsoring its 80th Anniversary Jubilee. 
A reception will follow, and child care will 
be available. Tickets are $15 and avail- 
able from MFSA representatives or in our 
Hospitality Suite at Days Inn, Room 610. 

Alaska-Pacific University invites 
delegates, friends, and staff of the 
General Conference to their hospitality 
suite at the Sheraton Hotel. The suite will 
be open 4-8 p.m., Wednesday through 
Friday. 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



69 



PLANNING FOR THE 1988 GENERAL CONFERENCE 



When Methodism first arrived in Mis- 
souri, the flag of Spain was waving over 
the Government House in St. Louis. 

A gentlemen by the name of John 
Clark was the first Methodist to preach 
in Missouri. The event took place in late 
summer of 1798. John Wesley had been 
dead only six years. The Methodist Epis- 
copsd Church in America had been or- 
ganized for just 14 years. 

Clark preached from a tiny boat to a 
small group of settlers who had gathered 
near the mouth of a creek. He lived al- 
most directly across the Mississippi, in a 
small Illinois settlement where he was a 
part-time teacher and preacher. With 
John Clark's sermon, Methodism 
reached into the farthest western edge of 
the American frontier. 

These many years later, as the church 
looks to the frontiers of the future, it is 
appropriate that the first General Con- 
ference in our third century be held in 
this Gateway City. 

Establishing the Territory 

WUliam McKendree, presiding elder of 
the Cumberland District, visited Mis- 
souri in the summer of 1807. His district 
reached from Nashville, Tennessee, to 
all of the settled portions of Missouri, a 
major portion of Kentucky, all of Illinois, 
western Indiana and Arkansas. Its enor- 
mous size indicates how thinly and wide- 
ly scattered were the settlements. 

One day McKendree was asked if he 
could travel over and through so large a 
district. He replied that he could "if 
Bishop Asbury would furnish him an im- 
mortal horse." 

Accompanied by a few others, Mc- 
Kendree rode by horseback to the bank 
of the Mississippi. Since there was no 
way to get the horses across the river, 
they lefl them in Illinois and took a 
canoe or small boat across the river. 
Finding no horses available on the Mis- 
souri side, they set out for a camp meet- 
ing some forty miles north, walking and 
carrying their baggage. 

It was at this camp meeting the first 
service of Holy Communion was 
celebrated by Methodists of Missouri. 
Crusts of corn bread were used and the 
wine was the juice of polk berries 
sweetened with maple sugar. 

These many years later, it is ap- 
propriate that the 1988 session of the 
General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church will officially open 
with Communion as did that camp meet- 
ing in 1807. The service is slated for 1:30 
p.m. Tuesday, April 26. Following that, 
and for the next ten days until Friday 



Ed. note: DeWayne Woodring gave the 
following talk at a pre-General Con- 
ference press briefing in St. Louis in 
November 1987. 



evening May 6, the business sessions will 
be held. 

Within this time-frame, the Book of 
Discipline will be written, and you in the 
audience will be taking part in one of the 
largest and longest conclaves of any 
religious or secidar organization. 

One hundred eighty years ago when 
John Clark preached from that boat, the 
gathering of the faithful was planned on 
almost a spur of the moment basis. 

Preparations Today 

Unlike that service, preparations for 
the forthcoming General Conference 
began years ago. The responsibOity for 
the planning is vested in a body known 
as the Commission on the General Con- 
ference. It is composed of lay and clergy 
representatives who are nominated by 
the Council of Bishops and elected by the 
General Conference, plus certain ex-of- 
ficio members. 

Six years ago, the commission an- 
nounced that invitations were now being 
received from annual conferences inter- 
ested in hosting the 1988 event. 

After receiving the invitations, a Site 
Task Group visited the proposed cities. 
In each one, the group met with conven- 
tion bureau management, hoteliers, con- 
vention center personnel and United 
Methodists of the area. 

The members studied the airline ser- 
vice to the city, the freeway system, per- 
sonally visited hotel rooms, walked the 
streets, observed restaurants, assessed 
safety, and spent extensive time in the 
convention center studying it from stem 
to stern. 




During this study, the Site Task Group 
asked a variety of questions. Can the 
convention center adequately hold, in 
one room, 1,000 delegates seated school- 
room style, a stage 40 by 96 feet plus 
5,000 visitors, reserve delegates and 
staff? Are there sufficient rooms to hold 
the legislative committees, subcommit- 
tees, communications center, food ser- 
vice, editorial and other offices? 

The pioneer Methodists met wherever 
they could: rough-hewn cabins, taverns, 
court-houses, groves, under bush arbors 
and even on ferries ~ almost any kind of 
building or public gathering place suf- 
ficed. 

The 1988 General Conference will be 
located in the modern Alfonso J. Cer- 
vantes Convention and Exhibition 
Center, which occupies two square 
blocks in downtown St. Louis. Around 
6,000 persons will be drawn to that 
facOity each day of the eleven-day con- 
ference. 

In contrast to the last General Con- 
ference, which had to be in two separate 
buildings in Baltimore, all the plenary 
sessions, legislative committees, sub- 
committees and offices will be con- 
veniently located under one roof. 

Housing Then and Now 

The participants in early camp meet- 
ings slept in covered wagons, tents, lean- 
tos of branches cut from nearby trees, or, 
if fortunate, in windowless log shelters 
with earthen floors. 

The Task Group for this General Con- 
ference had to look for nearly 1,900 
rooms in modem hotels, hopefully lo- 
cated near the convention center. And 
the committee actually walked the dis- 
tance to be sure that when the local folks 
said 2 1/2 blocks, it was not 2 1/2 miles 
they were talking about. 

After rating each city on 12 different 
concerns, ranging from the accessibility 
and overall costs to the appropriateness 
of the convention center and the 
availability of hotel space, the Task 
Group then made its recommendation to 
the Commission on the General Con- 
ference, which took the final vote on the 
site more than five and one-half years 
ahead of the conference. 

The church founders had few if any 
formalized agreements concerning the 
meeting sites, whereas today the com- 
mission must enter into contracts with 
the convention center, each hotel, the 
convention bureau, decorating firm, 
sound, lighting and audio visual com- 
panies and various equipment rental 
agencies. 



70 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



Early camp meetings required little in 
the way of resources or equipment. The 
attendees brought their own Bibles, 
food, clothing and cooking equipment. 

The delegates to General Conference 
will be arriving not only with their lug- 
gage, but will also be carrying the Ad- 
vance Edition of the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate, which will weigh about four 
pounds. 

To serve the needs of the General Con- 
ference, we are currently looking for 65 
typewriters, 66 secretarial chairs, 780 
tables, 60 office chairs, plus 5,780 other 
chairs, five copying machines, 31 
microphones, a very large sound system, 
several computers and one swivel chair 
for the presiding officer. 

In addition, personnel are busily 
rounding up calculators, staples, paper 
clips, metal files, coat racks, wastepaper 
baskets and 40 tons of paper for use 
during the conference, plus two image 
magnification projectors, each capable 
of projecting an image 32' x 24'. 

Arriving on the Scene 

In the late 1700s and early 1800s, the 
attendees at church meetings arrived 
mainly by horseback. They rode 40 to 60 
miles a day, staying in cabins, aban- 
doned buildings, barns or under the 
stars using saddlebags as pillows. 

The concerns of the Methodist 
pioneers attending a gathering were 
whether or not the roads and trails 
would be passable and the waters ford- 
able. Today we worry about how many 
seats there are on planes, buses and 
trains servicing the host city in a 24-hour 
period, and we seek to negotiate special 
fares for the travelers. 

The farthest distance traveled by 
those early settlers to attend a meeting 
could be measured in tens or hundreds 
of miles. Nearly two hundred years later, 
the farthest distance traveled by a 
delegate to this General Conference will 
be 10,204 air miles, which will be 
traversed by jet plane in about a day. 

Once in St. Louis, in addition to busi- 
ness deliberations, the delegates, will 
witness three special events. They are 
the Episcopal Address, Tuesday evening 
(April 26); the Address of the Laity, Wed- 
nesday morning (April 27); and the host 
area presentation, Sunday evening (May 
1). 

Local Plans 

In addition to preparing the area 
presentation, the Local Committee is 
hard at work arranging for the general 
hosting of the delegates and visitors. 
These tasks range from providing 
stewards for the Communion Service, 



skilled nurses, secretarial personnel and 
registration staff to the planning of 
preaching assignments, a reception, 
sightseeing tours and an information 
area. 

As with any major event, problems are 
bound to arise during the last months of 
preparation. 

We discovered, for instance, that the 
housing forms sent to the Minnesota 
delegation were burned due to an acci- 
dent of the postal truck carrying the 
mailings. A hotel with a block of 200 
rooms for our conference announced 
last week that it is dosing to turn the 
facility into an all-suite hotel. They 
won't be open again until next Novem- 
ber. Another hotel with 125 rooms 
leased much of its space to the U.S. 
government. And the portable bleachers 
we were counting on in the convention 
center were left out in the rain. They 
rusted so badly the fire marshall has con- 
demned them. Such are some of our 
recent "challenges." 

Turning a moment to costs, the expen- 
ses of holding those early pioneer meet- 
ings were negligible ~ a little more wood 
for the fire in the winter and some addi- 
tional candles for the evening hours. 
The participants paid their own expen- 
ses. The meetings had very little finan- 
cial impact on the communities where 
they were held. 

The St. Louis Convention and Visitors 
Commission tells us that the economic 
impact of next spring's conference on 
the St. Louis community will be 
$9,245,520. 

The budget for the 1988 General Con- 
ference is $2.5 million. This covers the 
cost of the transportation of the official 
delegates, a per diem of $55 a day, the 
rental of meeting facilities, equipment 
and services and the printing of the 
Daily Christian Advocate. However, the 
total expended is much, much greater, 
since many of those in attendance have 
expenses paid out of other church funds. 
Taking the budgeted amount of money 
and applying it to just those hours when 
the delegates will be together in worship, 
plenary sessions or in legislative com- 
mittees, the cost comes out to be at least 
$30,086 an hour or $501.43 a minute. 

What do we get out of this massive ex- 
penditure of funds? Theyears of advance 
planning, the time of 1,000 delegates, 
plus the participation of thousands of 
others in this quadrennial event. 

We get the law, the policies, the goals 
of our denomination. How worthwhile 
they will be and how relevant to our age 
is the responsibility of you the elected 
delegates. And how well the goals and 
programs are transmitted and inter- 
preted within our denomination rests 
heavily with you the communicators. 



Attend Pastors' 
School Without 
Leaving Home 




Hear the best lecturers from pas- 
tors' schools across the nation for 
only $5.60 per tape. 
\o more three-day trips a\va\' 
from the family and church. \o 
more plane fares or motel bills. 
Just the best lectures available. 
A complete list of speeches is not 
available. We want to give you 
the best of the best. If a tip-top 
lecture comes in at the last min- 
ute, we will slip it in. Lecturers 
featured in the past have includ- 
ed: Dean Marjorie Suchocki, Dr. 
Ted Runyan, Dr. Fred Craddock, 
Bishop Woodie W. White, Bishop 
Judith Craig, Dr. Walter Harrel- 
son, Dr. C. S. Song, Dr. John 
Claypool, Dr. William Willimon, 
Dr. Zan Holmes, Dr. Mortimer 
Arias, the Rev. Will D. Campbell. 



n Yes, I want you to send me 
one tape a month from the best of 
pastors' schools for only $5.60 per 
tape ($67.50 per year). 
I understand that I may cancel 
my subscription at anytime and 
receive the balance of my sub- 
scription. 



Newscope Lecture Series 
P. O. Box 801 
Nashville, TN 37202 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



71 



Artist donates 4,000 hours 
to complete backdrop 



The hammering, sawing, sketching 
and painting that began on a farm along 
the Ohio River in 1986 is now a 25-foot 
high, 800 pound centerpiece for the 1988 
general conference. 

"I'm just elated to be a part of this 
thing," effervesces designer Jerry N. 
Baum, an art instructor at the University 
of Southern Indiana in Evansville. "This 
is the most meaningful thing I've ever 
been involved in." 

That says a lot. Mr. Baum seems to 
have made a career of volunteering his 
talents in meaningful things, ranging 
from watercolors in Africa sold for 
United Methodist mission support to 15 
years of designing the Christmas card 
prints for the American Cancer Society 
in Indiana. 

While Mr. Baum is the designer, the 
production supervisor for the General 
Conference backdrop is a farmer who 
has a reputation for being quiet, modest 
and one of those people who is called on 
to fix things around the Simpson United 
Methodist Church in Evansville to which 
both he and Baum belong. 

His name is Michael J. Kolb and the 
family farm is a large one, located not far 
from where Indiana, Illinois and Ken- 
tucky all come together and where there 
are a couple of tiny towns called 
Farmersville and Solitude. 



The work (afler the initial design) 
began at the farm and moved to the fel- 
lowship hall of Simpson Church where 
the whole community became involved. 

Even a neighboring Catholic Church 
offered space for the construction when 
it appeared the pieces of the backdrop 
were going to be too large for the 
Simpson doors. 

Total cost of the backdrop, which will 
be used in other events by the Indiana 
United Methodists after the General 
Conference, is expected to be about 
$750-900. With 4,000 volunteer hours in 
its completion, artist Baum estimates it 
could have cost six times that much. 

He is most excited by the three-dimen- 
sional aspect of the backdrop. The 
denominational symbol is forward of the 
global base by 16 inches, which under 
the St. Louis Convention Center lights 
will cast impressive shadows on the 
world. 

"Never in my life have I enjoyed some- 
thing as much as this," says Baum. Per- 
haps. But only days after General Con- 
ference the water-color specialist who 
has painted around the world will be off 
to West Germany to paint live on stage 
during a symphony concert, his work 
being projected on a large screen for the 
audience. 

-Robert L. Friedly 




UMPH Bicentennial Diorama 




Jim Steele 



A Bible, a circuit rider, and a printing 
press are the focal points of a diorama 
focusing on the contribution of The 
United Methodist Publishing House in 
advancing the cause of Christianity 
through its publishing. This session of 
General Conference begins a year-long 
celebration of the publishing house's 
200th anniversary. 

Stop by and view the bicentennial 
video presentation, across from the dis- 
play, which shares the publishing 
house's continued commitment to the 
church through the printed word, 
videotapes, and satellite programming. 



Robert K. Feaster, President and 
Publisher of The United Methodist 
Publishing House, and Jean Sanborn, 
his administrative assistant, admire the 
diorama celebrating two hundred years 
of publishing. 



72 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



Looking for a quick lunch 
or breakfast near Cervantes Convention Center? 



It's lunch time and the agenda calls for 
you to be back in place shortly. The ques- 
tion: "Where do we grab a quick 
sandwich and drink?" 

Some may choose to patronize Con- 
vention Center refreshment bars and 
wait 'til evening for "the real meal." 
Others will want to stretch the legs and 
breathe the outside air, polluted or not. 

But as an alternative to the limited 
fare of the "in-house" stands and the 
more expensive hotel food, most all 
Gateway City observers have two sugges- 
tions within easy walking distance of the 
Center: (1) The remodeled Union 
Market and (2) the St. Louis Centre. 

The closest food-serving facOities are 
located immediately to the east of the 
front entrance to the Convention 
Center. One-and-a-half blocks to the left 
is a Burger King (located in the Bus 
Depot). Across Convention Plaza (a 
street) at Sixth Street is the aforemen- 
tioned Union Market. On the ground 
level, arranged around the outside walls, 



Read on! 

are a series of short-order eating shops; 
in the center are tables and chairs. 
These include a Grecian food place, a 
pizza shop, the China Town Express, an 
ice cream stand, a bakery, and a branch 
shop for St. Louis' most famous chili 
house~O.T. Hodge. On the balcony is a 
cafe where patrons are served at tables. 
The fare includes some specialties and 
sandwiches, plus a variety of "non- 
Methodist" drinks. 

However, the "crown jewel" of 
downtown St. Louis since August 1985 is 
the St. Louis Centre on Sixth Street, only 
two blocks from the Convention Center. 
(The St. Louis Centre is "anchored" at 
each end of two of the city's prominent 
department stores, Farmous-Barr and 
DUlard's.) 

On the fourth level are 20 short-order 
food shops of almost every conceivable 
type, surrounding a common seating 
area; hundreds may eat at any one time. 
In addition, there are other fast-food ser- 
vice areas on other levels of the Centre, 



all available by escalators or an elevator 
for use by persons with handicapping 
conditions. (More exclusive dining 
rooms are on the first level.) 

Across from the St. Louis Centre, in 
the first floor area of the Ambassador 
Building, is a breakfast-lunch cafe which 
has served St. Louis people since 1812 (it 
must be an O.K place). 

Depending how far one wants to 
wander for lunch, there are many other 
eatingplaces to the south and west of the 
Convention Center. There are no public 
eating places to the immediate north of 
the Center. 

Those who enjoy cafeteria fare may 
wish to sample Miss Hullings, 11th and 
Locust, a St. Louis tradition since the 
mid-1930s. Medium-priced fare, it is ap- 
proximately a four or five-block walk 
from the Convention Center. Miss Hull- 
ings is also open for evening meals until 
8 p.m. 

-Charles McEowen/James Steele 



Video and Audiotapes 'Catch the Spirit' of General 

Conference 



If you are wondering how you will be 
able to capture the flavor of General 
Conference for your friends and 
parishioners back home, set your mind 
at ease. A variety of video and 
audiotapes are being produced to make 
your work easy. 

United Methodist Communications in 
cooperation with the United Methodist 
Publishing House is producing a 30- 
minute summary for "Catch the Spirit," 
the weekly cable television show. 
UMCom earlier produced a 30-minute 
pre-conference briefing for "Catch the 
Spirit." The videos set the mood and give 
quick overviews. That gives you time to 
fill in some of the details and lead a dis- 
cussion on the actions of the 1988 legis- 
lative assembly. 

Perhaps, you want a longer, more 
detailed summary of the event. That also 
will be available. Good News Television 
(GNTV), based in Macon, Ga., and the 
publishing house are co-producing a 45- 
to 60-minute summary. The 1988 as- 
sembly is the second such event that has 
been featured on videotape. The first 
videos were produced for the General 



Conference celebrating the Bicentennial 
of Methodism. 

For the fourth time, audiotapes of a 
General Conference session are being 
produced. GNTV and the Newscope Lec- 
ture Series, a product of the publishing 
house, are joining forces to create two 
audiotapes of the session. As in previous 
events, the Lay and Episcopal addresses 
will be available on audiotape. Also, a 90- 
minute post-conference summary will be 
produced. Earlier, GNTV and the lecture 
series, which offers monthly audiotapes 
of seminary and pastors' schools to sub- 
scribers, co-produced a 90-minute pre- 
conference briefing. The three tapes are 
automatically sent to subscribers to the 
Newscope Lecture Series as part of the 
annual package. They can also be or- 
dered on an individual basis or as a three- 
tape package. 

Whether you use the video or audio 
resources to present General Conference 
to your church friends, you will find a 10- 
minute slide/audiotape package helpful 
in setting the stage for your presenta- 
tion. The audiovisual helps listeners to 
see the way the conference operates. 



Bette Prestwood, editor of Newscope 
and director of the Newscope Lecture 
Series, has coordinated the development 
of the resources. UMCom executives 
Nelson Price and Bruno Caliandro 
produced the "Catch the Spirit" 
videotapes. GNTV head Don Wood and 
Prestwood developed the audiotapes, 
slide/tape package, and the longer video 
summary. UMPH audio technician 
George Dunn edited the on-site 
audiotapes. 

Both video and audio resources can be 
ordered at the General Church Periodi- 
cals sales booth, just outside the United 
Methodist Publishing House exhibit. 
They will be mailed as soon as possible 
after the close of the conference. 



CORRECTION 

A DCA subscription is $34.50 
(not $30) when picked up daily at 
the booth and $46 (not $40) when 
mailed to a church or home ad- 
dress. Single copies of the DCA are 
$3 (not $2). 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



73 



Eating out in St. Louis 
Fine dining abounds in downtown and beyond 



Consistent with pride in their multi- 
ethnic neighborhoods, St. Louisans 
boast a great number of fine restaurants 
which reflect their heritage. 

Many believe an extended visit to the 
Gateway City isn't complete without 
sampling excellent food on "The Hill," lo- 
cale for many outstanding Italian res- 
taurants; or Westport Plaza with its 
great variety of cuisine; or world-class 
Tony's downtown; or eating places as- 
sociated with sports heroes such as 
Shannon's or Dierdorf and Hart; or great 
restaurants along Watson Road on the 
way out to Crestwood; or South County 
spots; or KemoU's, an internationally- 
known Italian restaurant just off Inter- 
state 70; or even across the mighty Mis- 
sissippi to sample some of the good cook- 
ing in western Illinois. 

The Hill, incidently, is bounded rough- 
ly by Hampton Avenue on the west. 
Kings highway on the east, 1-44 to the 
north, and Southwest Avenue. A number 
of the restaurants are relatively expen- 



Lots to Choose from 

Whether you stay close to downtown 
or roam by car or taxi to far reaches of 
the metropolitan area, there's no lack of 
great dining in this historic river city. In 
fact Bon Appetit cited St. Louis in 1985 
for its wealth of fine eating places. 
Tony's, at 826 N. Broadway, is one of 
only 12 restaurants in the nation given 
Mobil's five-star rating. It's a standout 
Italian restaurant in the city (although 
not in "The Hill"). Anthony's, also 
downtown at 10 Broadway, is a four-star 
continental restaurant serving such 
dishes as veal francoise and rack of lamb. 
In either case, it won't be cheap. 



Nearby restaurants 

Within a short walk or cab ride from 
the Cervantes Convention Center are 
three "clusters" of good restaurants 
catering to a variety of tastes and pock- 
etbooks. They are: 

St. Louis Centre -Opened in 1985, it 
is a $176.5 million shopping and dining 
aggregation with 1.5 million square feet 
of space. On Sixth Street just two blocks 
from the Convention Center, it anchors 
the city's two leading department stores, 
Farmous-Barr and Dillard's. Many term 
it "the crown jewel" of downtown St. 
Louis. 

Laclede's Landing - Head east from 
the Convention Center toward the Mis- 



sissippi. This 19th century rivertown set- 
ting (complete with cast iron street 
lamps and cobblestone streets) is located 
on the levee just north of historic Eads 
Bridge. It's the site where Pierre Laclede 
first stepped onto the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi to found St. Louis in 1764. A 
dozen years ago, it was an area of aban- 
doned, decaying warehouses, but now ~ 
a lively collection of restaurants, night 
spots and offices. Among eating places 
are the Old Spagetti Factory and Han- 
nigans. 

Union Station - at 18th and Market, 
it is approximately 19 blocks from the 
convention center - an invigorating walk 
for those up to it, otherwise a short cab 
ride. A beautiful Romanesque-style 
train terminal built in 1894 and once the 
busiest in the nation, it saw the last train 
leave in 1979. Six years later, the 
renovated complex opened again hous- 
ing an array of restaurants, boutiques 
and unique shops. A variety of eating 
places are within Union Station includ- 
ing the German Biergarten (on the shore 
of a human-made lake) and Dierdorf and 
Hart, well-known for steak. 

Some restaurants are permanently 
moored at the Mississippi River's edge 
near the Gateway Arch. Best known of 
these is the Lt. Robert E. Lee, noted for 
seafood and steak. (It's not a misprint; 
the famous Confederate general was a 
lieutenant during his earlier days with 
the U. S. Army Engineers at St. Louis.) 
Those wishing an inexpensive meal on 
the water's edge can patronize a 
McDonald's, a Burger King and others. 

Hotel Restaurants 

Several of St. Louis' hotels also offer 
excellent restaurants. The Omni Inter- 
national Hotel, located in Union Station, 
features the American Rotisserie, named 
for its $750,000 rotisserie. The Top of the 
Riverfront, perched high atop the 
Clarion St. Louis Hotel, offers excellent 
food and an unmatched view of the city 
as the entire dining area rotates once an 
hour. Faust's, at the Adams's Mark 
Hotel, has revived the tradition of fine 
dining reestablished by the renowned 
19th century restaurant, Tony Faust's. 
M&B's Bar and Grill, located in Hotel 
Majestic, is a successor to Stan Musial 
and Biggies, a popular St. Louis res- 
taurant owned in part by baseball Car- 
dinal Stan "The Man" Musial. The Breck- 
enridge Inn-Frontenac's restaurant. The 
Provinces, serves both French and 
American cuisine in a French provincial 



atmosphere. Posh's at the Park, at the 
Park Terrace Hilton across from the air- 
port, has continential and French 
nouvelle cuisine. 

Listed below are a few other selected 
restaurants in the "fine dining" category. 
Obviously what has been covered in this 
brief account is only a sampling; check 
entertainment guides, Yellow Pages, 
hotel listings, newspapers, etc. for a 
more comprehensive look at eating out 
in the Gateway City. 

Al Baker's, 8101 Clayton Road., 863- 

Catfish & Crystal, 409 N. 11th St., 231- 
7703 

Cheshire Inn, 6301 Clayton Rd., 647- 
7300 

Dominic's, 5101 Wilson Ave., 77 1- 1632 

Giovanni's on the Hill, 5201 Shaw, 
772-5958 

Henry VIII, 4690 N. Lindbergh Blvd., 
Bridgeton, 731-4888 

KemoU's Restaurant, 4201 N. Grand 
Ave., 534-2705 

Richard Perry, 3265 S. Jefferson Ave., 
771-4100 

Tenderloin Room, in the Chase Park 
Plaza, 361-2500 

Wade's A Gathering Place, 611 N. 
Lindbergh Blvd. 997-5151 

-James Steele/Charles McEowen 

''' f^ night perfor- 

mance may be picked up at the Sheraton 
Hotel. Suggested donation $5 per per- 
son. Delegates have been issued tickets 
in their packets. 



Assembly Organ Has 
Pipe/Organ Sound 

The organ specially installed for this 
event is a Rodgers Oxford 925. This in- 
strument uses advanced microprocessor 
controls in a large specification of tradi- 
tional pipe organ design. It has complete 
voicing and scaling capabilities that allow 
adaptation to any acoustical environ- 
ment. As on all Rodgers classical instru- 
ments, real wind-blown pipes are option- 
al on the Oxford 925. This magnificent 
instrument creates both traditional pipe 
organ sound and visual impressiveness 
when restricted budgets preclude large, 
full pipe instruments. 

Rodgers Organ Company in Hillsboro, 
Oregon provided this organ to General 
Conference at a reduced fee. 



74 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



Further Updating 
Handbook For Delegates 

(Section A, Advance Edition) 
Seating Assignment Corrections 



North Mississippi (A-8) 

Section A, Row 10, Seats 5-12 

Switzerland/France (A-9 and A-61) 

Section C, Row 19, Seats 1-2 

Standing Administrative Conmiittees 

(A-13) 

Committee on Calendar 

Remove: Glenda C. Thomas 
Add: Donna LaPoint 

Committee on Reference 

Remove: Ray Wagner 
Add: James Anderson 
G. Jackson Miller 

Committee on Credentials 

Add: LeonVetta 
Tellers (A-14-15) 

Group I - Section A 

Remove Ruth Harlow and move Ressie Mae Bass from reserve 
to regular teller 

Standing Legislative Committees 
Church and Society (A- 17) 

Remove: Messer, Donald E. Rocky Mountain 
Add: Geis, Sally B, Rocky Mountain 
Morales, Secundino M. Panama 
Osorio, Juan. Chile 
Vivas, Nolberto Ecuador 

Conferences (A- 18) 

Remove: Phoenix, Sybil., Great Britain 
Add: Bullock, Clifton V. West Michigan 

Discipleship (A- 18) 

Add: Diaz, Roberto C, Costa Rica 
Hutauruk, Laurentius, Indonesia 
Li, Ping-Kwong, Hong Kong 
Sarabia, Ivan Patricio, Ecuador 

Faith and Mission (A- 19) 

Add: Aco, Isac Alberto Rodrigues , Brazil 
Herrera, Elias Hernande,z Mexico 
Pagura, Federico J. ,Argentina 

Financial Administration (A-20) 

Add: Garcia, Magaly. Cuba 
Rios, Roberto, Bueno Mexico 

General Administration (A-21) 

Remove: Anderson, Rodney Rocky Mountain 

Global Ministries (A-22) 

Add: Lin, David Huo-fu Hong Kong 



Osorio, Miguel A., Cuba 
Poma, Eugenia, Bolivia 
Vargas, R. Kenneth, Costa Rica 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy (A- 
23) 

Remove: Geis, Sally B., Rocky Mountain 
Add: Anderson, Rodney, Rocky Mountain 
de Souza Maia, Adriel, Brazil 
Fajardo, Juan, Panama 
Tambunan, R. P. M., Indonesia 

Independent Commissions/ Judicial Ad- 
minstration (A-24) 

Remove: Bullock, Clifton V., West Michigan 
Add: Bleyle,DeannaM., Rocky Mountain 
Braga, Lucia Leiga Oliveira, Brazil 
Flores, Francisco, Bolivia 
Phoenix, Sybil, Great Britain 
Shwe, U. Saw Burma 

Local Church (A-24) 

Add: Gallardo, David Chile 
Myat, U Tun Burma 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministy (A-25) 

Remove: Bleyle, Deanna M. Rocky Mountain 
Add: Messer, Donald E^ Rocky Mountain 

Voting and Reserve Delegates 

Northeast Zaire Annual Conference (A- 
51) 

Change name from Menatu Wayna Onema to MeNato Tete 
Wanya 

Non-Voting Delegates 

Iglesia Evangelica Metodista de Costa 
Rica (DCA first edition) 

Remove: Morales, Fernando 

Add: Diaz, Roberto C. (3); bishop; Apartado 5481, San Jose, 
Costa Rica 

Evangelical Methodist Church in 
Bolivia (2) 

Sec. A Row 22, Seats 2-3 

Poma, Eugenio (7); bishop; Casilla 356, La Paz, Bolivia 

Flores, Francisco (9); lay pastor; Casilla 356, La Paz Bolivia 

The Methodist Church in Brazil (3) 

Sec. A Row 22 Seats 4-6 

Aco, Isac Alberto Rodrigues (4); bishop; Caixa Postal 1219, 
90.000 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 

de Souza Maia, Adriel (8); bishop; Caixa Postal 1466, 30.000 
Bela Horizonte, MG, Brazil 

Braga, Lucia Leiga Oliveira (9); teacher; Caixa Postal 1466, 
30.000 Bela Horizonte, MG, BrasU 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



75 



Methodist Church of Chile (2) 

Sec. A Row 22, Seats 7-8 

Osario, Juan (1); pastor; Casilla 2341, Concepcion, Chile 

Gallardo, David (10); teacher; Casilla 2341, Concepcion, Chile 

The United Evangelical Church of 
Ecuador 

Sec. D. Row 22, Seats 1-2 

Vivas, Nolberto (1); pastor; Casilla 236-A, Quito, Ecuador 
Sarabia, Ivan Patricio (3); president. The United Evangelical 
Church of Ecuador; Casilla 236-A, Quito, Ecuador 



The Evangelical Methodist Church in 
Panama (2) 

Sec. D, Row 22. Seats 3-4 

Morales, Secundino M. (1); bishop; Apartado 7453, Panama 5, 
Panama 

Fajardo, Juan (8); president, Pan-American Institute; Apar- 
tado 7453, Panama 5, 

Panama 



Officers of Standing Administrative Committees 



Committee on Agenda 

Chair John E. Bevan 
Vice-chair James M. Lawson, Jr. . 
Secretary Dorothy Luckert 
Committee on Calendar 
Chair Donna La Point 
Vice-chair Nancy Fowlkes 
Secretary Jane Schairer 
Committee on Correlation 
and Editorial Revision 
Chair Earl W. Riddle 
Vice-chair Bruce E. Krause 
Secretary Naomi G. Bartle 
Committee Courtesies 
and Privileges 
Chair S. Clifton Ives 
Vice-chair Phyllis S. Ferguson 
Secretary Jeff Bross 
Committee on Credentials 



Chair Tal Oden 
Vice-chair James S. Gadsden 
Secretary Judy Brummet 
Committee on Journal 
Chair Jamima P. Demarcus 
Vice-chair Patricia Bigler 
Secretary Edward W. Paup. 
Committee on Presiding Officers 
Chair James M. Walker 
Vice-chair Richard W. Cain 
Secretary Sue Davidson 
Committee on Reference 
Chair Ernest Lyght 
Vice-chair Mary A/in Swenson 
Secretary Fritz Mutti 
Legislative Committee 
Coordinators 

1) Church and Society - B.F. Carroll 

2) Conferences -A. Fritz Mutti 



3) Discipleship - G. Jackson Miller 

4) Faith & Mission - E. Robert Dicker- 
son III 

5) Financial Administration - Joel E. 
Huffman 

6) General Administration - James 
Anderson 

7) Global Ministries - Mary Ann Swen- 
son 

8) Higher Education and Chaplaincy - 
John L. Francis 

9) Independent Commissions & Judi- 
cial Administration - Thomas Queen 

10) Local Church - C. Wilbourne Han- 
cock. 

11) Ordained & Diaconal Ministry - 
Clelia D. Hendrix 

12) Central Conference Affairs - Wil- 
liam Hemphill 



Officers of Legislative Conunittees 



Commission on Central 
Conference Affairs 

Emerito P. Nacpil, chair 
Arthur F. Kulah, vice-chair 
Edwin C. Boulton, secretary 

Conferences 

Harry Kent, chair 

Dollie Watkins Crist, vice-chair 

Becky Thompson, secretary 

Church and Society 

Richard S. Parker, chair 

Pat Callbeck Harper, vice-chair 

Helen G. Taylor, secretary 

Discipleship 

Rex C. Bevins, chair 

MoUie M. Stewart, vice-chair 

Sharon Neufer Emswiler, secretary 

Financial Administration 

David Dolsen, chair 
Ewing Werlein, vice-chair 
Beverly Beriy, secretary 



Faith and Mission 

Thomas A. Langford, chair 
Barbara Blackstone, vice-chair 
R. Sheldon Duecker, secretary 

General Administration 

Walter Kimbrough, chair 
Jean Dowell, vice-chair 
Twick Morrison, secretary 

Global Ministries 

Sharon Brown-Christopher, chair 
Gordon Goodgame, vice-chair 
Thalia Matherson, secretary 

Higher Education and 
Chaplaincy 

Nancy Carruth, chair 
Joan Hoover, vice-chair 
Thelma Johnson, secretary 

Independent Commissions/ 
Judicial Administration 

Carolyn Johnson, chair 
Donald A Ott, vice-chair 



Faith J. Conklin, secretary 

Local Church 

Carolyn Marshall, chair 
C.L. Henderson, vice-chair 
dflnice Hvie, secretary 

Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministry 

Dan E. Solomon, chair 
Rosa Washington, vice-chair 
June D. McCullough, secretary 



76 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



Judicial Council Decisions 



MEMORANDUM 586 

IN RE: Request for a re-hearing 
on Memorandum 586. 

The request is denied. 
AprU 25, 1986 
Tom Matheny, President 
Hoover Rupert, Secretary 

MEMORANDUM NO. 590 

IN RE: Delegation of Power to 
the Conference Council on Finance 
and Administration or Any Other 
Conference Agency to Act For the 
Annual Conference. 

A written request was made of Bishop 
James S. Thomas for a decision as to 
whether the Annual Conference has the 
authority to delegate to the Conference 
Council on Finance and Administration 
or any other annual conference agency 
the right to distribute remittances for 
the administrative budget either in 
amounts or percentages difTerent from 
that established by the Annual Con- 
ference. 

In making his ruling, the bishop 
referred to the general principle that 
"boards and agencies are always 
amenable to the Annual Conference and 
are not free to assume any delegation of 
powers that is not specifically stated." 
Citing para. 703 and 710.1 (1984 Dis- 
cipline), he ruled: "The specific answer 
given to the question stated above is: 
No." 

The ruling is before the Judicial Coun- 
cil for review as provided in para. 2612 
of the 1984 Z)jscip/me. 

The Judicial Council has consistently 
held that the Annual Conference may 
not delegate any authority given it by the 
Discipline. See Decision No. 584. 

The ruling of the Bishop is affirmed. 

AprU 25, 1988 

Tom Matheny, President 

Hoover Rupert, Secretary 

MEMORANDUM NO. 591 

IN RE: Review of a Ruling by 
Bishop James S. Thomas in the 
East Ohio Conference Concerning 
the Adoption by an Annual Con- 
ference of a unified "Administra- 
tive Budget" Which Prioritizes Ap- 
portionments for Ministerial Sup- 
port. 

At the 1987 East Ohio Annual Con- 
ference, Bishop James S. Thomas was 
asked to rule on the following question: 

May an Annual Conference, when 
adopting a unified "administrative 
budget" with single figure apportion- 
ment which includes apportionments 



for ministerial support items, namely, 
apportionments for bishops, district su- 
perintendents, conference claimants 
(pensions and benefits) and the Equi- 
table Salary Fund establish a priority 
claim for such items of ministerial sup- 
port and direct that the remittances 
from a local church treasurer shall be 
credited fully to ministerial support 
items for the local church shall have 
been met? 

Relying on the provisions of para. 
710.1 and para. 715.2 of the 1984 Dis- 
cipline, the Bishop ruled that such action 
would violate the Discipline. 

Pars. 710, 711, and 715 require that 
the amounts contributed in each local 
church for each of the budgeted funds be 
remitted to the Conference and applied 
by the Conference to such fund. These 
provisions are mandatory. The ruling of 
Bishop Thomas is affirmed. 

AprU 25, 1988 

Tom Matheny, President 

Hoover Rupert, Secretary 

DECISION NO 592 

IN RE: A Request From the North 
Carolina Annual Conference for a 
Decision on the Legality of its Ac- 
tion Requiring General and Juris- 
dictional Conference Delegates to 
Submit a Record of Their Voting. 

Digest 

An Annual Conference may not legis- 
late a requirement that delegates to 
General and Jurisdictional Conferences 
submit a record of their voting in the 
General and Jurisdictional Conference 
to be distributed to pastors and churches 
in the Annual Conference. There is no 
authority for the action of the North 
Carolina Conference and it is declared 
null and void. 

Statement of Facts 

In June 1987, the North Carolina An- 
nual Conference approved the following 
motion: 

that the delegates to General and 
Jurisdictional Conferences be required 
to submit a record of theirvotingon mat- 
ters of ordination and other critical mat- 
ters affecting the life of The United 
Methodist Church and that this record 
be distributed to pastors and churches 
through the first coordinated mailing 
following each of these conferences. 

Following this action the conference 
approved a motion appealing to the Judi- 
cial Council for a ruling on the "legality 
of the action." 

Jurisdiction 

The Judicial Council has jurisdiction 
under para. 2615 of the 1984 Discipline. 



Analysis 

The question here raised is whether an 
Annual Conference is empowered to re- 
quire from delegates to General Con- 
ference and Jurisdictional Conference a 
written record of their individual votes 
in the course of the sessions of the 
General Conference and Jurisdictional 
Conference. 

The Judicial Council dealt with a case 
similar in nature in Decision 109. 

A resolution was adopted in 1954 by a 
local church as to its members of the An- 
nual Conference instructing them to 
vote against "...any motions. Report, a 
Resolution that might be presented to 
the Annual Conference favoring any 
relaxation of the practice of racial 
segregation." 

The legality of that action taken in 
1954 was brought before the Presiding 
Bishop at the request of the Central 
Texas Conference. (See Decision 109. 

The Bishop ruled: 

In conformity with the generally ac- 
cepted principle that delegated members 
of a Church Council shall be free to make 
decisions in the light of facts and discus- 
sions concerning issues that are con- 
sidered by such body, the Discipline of 
The Methodist Church does not 
authorize an Official Board or a Quarter- 
ly Conference to order and instruct its 
Lay Member, or Reserve Lay Members of 
the Annual Conference to vote in any 
specified manner on matters coming 
before the Annual Conference. 

The Judicial Council affirmed that 
decision. The same principles apply to 
the question now before us. 

In The United Methodist Church 
delegates to General and Jurisdictional 
Conferences are historically and tradi- 
tionally elected without instruction. 

All requirements for qualifications, 
elections and service that are contained 
in the Discipline are powers reserved to 
the General Conference. We find no lan- 
guage in the Constitution or Discipline, 
nor has any been called to our attention 
giving authority to the Annual Con- 
ference to require that delegates report 
their votes; and they need not do so. 

Delegates to General Conference, just 
as members of an Annual Conference, 
are boimd to do as their conscience dic- 
tates what is good for the Church of 
Jesus Christ, The United Methodist 
Church in particular, and that only. 

Decision 

An Annual Conference may not legis- 
late a requirement that delegates to 
General and Jurisdictional Conferences 
submit a record of their voting in the 
General and Jurisdictional Conference 



AprU 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



77 



to be distributed to pastors and churches 
in the Annual Conference. There is no 
authority for the action of the North 
Carolina Conference and it is declared 
null and void. 

AprU 25, 1988 

Tom Matheny, President 

Hoover Rupert, Secretary 

DECISION NO. 593 

IN RE: Precedence of para. 810.3 
or para. 1702 as it Relates to 
Eligibility for Consecutive Quad- 
rennial Membership on General 
Agencies. 

Digest 

Para. 810.3 does not conflict with para. 
1702 (General Board of Publication) in 
regard to the election of its members 
which occurred prior to the close of the 
1984 General Conference but para 8 10.3 
applies to election that occur subsequent 
to the effective date of the legislation. 

Statement of Facts 

Two members were elected to the 
General Board of Publication until 1992 
under para. 1802 or the 1980 Discipline, 
now numbered 1702. 

In 1984, General Conference enacted 
an amendment to para. 810.3 declaring 
ineligible for election to a general agen- 
cy in the succeeding quadrennium any 
person who has served as a voting mem- 
ber of general agencies for four consecu- 



tive quadrennia, effective at the close of 
the 1984 General Conference. 

The two board members whose tenure 
is in question were declared ineligible to 
serve beyond 1988 by the Secretary of 
the Council of Bishops and the Secretary 
of the General Conference. 

The General Board of Publication at 
its October 1987 meeting voted to ask 
the Judicial Council for a declaratory 
decision in regard to the tenure of the 
two members in question. 

Jurisdiction 

The Judicial Council has jurisdiction 
under para. 2615 of the 1984 Discipline. 

Analysis 

The 1984 General Conference enacted 
para. 810.3 which prohibit election of a 
voting member to a general agency who 
has already served four consecutive 
quadrennium. Members of the epis- 
copacy are exempted. That legislation 
did not abrogate any elections that oc- 
curred prior to its effective date, the 
close of the 1984 General Conference. 

The 1980 General Conference enacted 
what is now para. 1702 which provided 
that membership on the General Board 
of Publication shall be for classes of one 
to three quadrennium. In effect, this 
meant that General Board of Publica- 
tion members could serve for three con- 
secutive quadrennium as opposed to two 
consecutive quadrennium for all other 
general agencies. 



Para. 810.3 does not conflict with para. 
1702 because there is no express lan- 
guage that prevents service on a general 
jigency for more than four consecutive 
quadrennium but the prohibition con- 
tained in the legislation addresses future 
elections. The two board members in 
question were elected prior to the effec- 
tive date of the legislation which 
restricts tenure. The language is neither 
vague nor ambiguous and there is noth- 
ing contained therein from which we can 
infer an intent to invalidate or nullify 
past elections. The express intent con- 
tained in the legislation prohibits elec- 
tions in subsequent quadrennia and does 
not invalidate or curtail a term of valid 
election that was held in a previous 
quadrennium. 

Decision 

Para. 810.3 which limits tenure on 
general agencies to four consecutive 
quadrennium does not conflict with 
para. 1702 (General Board of Publica- 
tion) insofar as it relates to the service of 
members who were elected to that agen- 
cy prior to the close of the 1984 General 
Conference but para. 810.3 is applicable 
to elections that occur subsequent to 
that date. 

April 25, 1988 

Tom Matheny, President 

Hoover Rupert, Secretary 



Petitions Re-referred by the Committee on Reference 



Old Petition Number 

226-CO-3000-R 

238-FA-3000-R 

279-FA-3000-M 

281-FA-3000-R$ 

341-GA-3000-R$ 

342-GA-3000-R 

343-GA-3000-R 

344-GA-3000-R 

349-LC-3000-R 

946-GA-3000-R 

952-MN-425-D 

1109-MN-528-D 

1193-CO-3000-R 

1201-GA-3000-R 

1241-FA-3000-R 

1248-FA-3000-R 

1254-GA-3000-R 

1327-GA-3000-R 



New Petition Number 

226-CS-3000-R 

238-CS-3000-R 

279-IJ-3000-M 

281-GM-3000-R$ 

341-CS-3000-S$ 

342-DI-3000-R 

343-DI-3000-R 

344-DI-3000-R 

349-GA-3000-R 

946-DI-3000-R 

952-FA-425-D 

1109-CO-0528-D 

1193-FA-3000-R 

1201-DI-3000-R 

1241-GA-3000-R 

1248-GM-3000-R 

1254-CS-3000-R 

1327-DI-3000-R 



Old Petition Number 

1340-GA-3000-R 

1347-FA-3000-R 

1406-IC-247-D 

1506-GA-3000-R 

1524-CO-3000-R 

1677-DI-3000-R 

1682-FA-3000-R 

1697-GA-3000-R$ 

1709-IJ-3000-R 

1750-GA-3000-R 

1820-GA-3000-R 

2050-GA-1414-D 

2276-GA-3000-S$ 

2279-CO-300-R 

2425-FA-3000-S$ 

2445-GA-3000-R 

2582-MN-3000-R 



New Petition Numberl 

1340-CS-3000-R 

1347-DI-3000-R 

1406-LC-267-D 

1506-IJ-3000-R 

1524-FM-3000-R 

1677-CS-3000-R 

1682-GM-3000-R 

1697-LC-300-R$ 

1709-CS-3000-R 

1750-DI-3000-R 

1820-CS-3000-R 

2050-GM-1414-D 

2276-DI-3000-S$ 

2279-DI-3000-R 

2425-GM-3000-S$ 

2445-DI-3000-R 

2582-CS-3000-R 



78 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



THE EPISCOPAL ADDRESS 
1988 General Conference 



To the United Methodist General Con- 
ference; to the members and friends of 
The United Methodist Church around 
the world: Grace to you and peace from 
God our Father and the Lord Jesus 
Christ. 

"God has delivered us from the power 
of evil and transferred us to the 
dominion of God's beloved Son, in whom 
we have redemption, the forgiveness of 
sins, who is the image of the invisible 
God, the first-born of all creation. For in 
Christ all things were created, in heaven 
and on earth, visible and invisible 
whether thrones or dominions or prin- 
cipalities or authorities-all things were 
created through Christ and for Christ. 
Christ is before all things, the one in 
whom all things hold together. Christ is 
the head of the body, the church, and is 
the beginning, the first-born from the 
dead, that in everything Christ might be 
pre-eminent. For in Christ all the full- 
ness of God was pleased to dwell, and 
through Christ to reconcile all things, 
whether on earth or in heaven, making 
peace by the blood of the cross." ^ 

Dear sisters and brothers, with the 
Apostle's words to the church at Colos- 
sae, we greet you. 

IN MEMORIAM 

Since we last gathered four years ago, a 
number of our colleagues in the Council 
of Bishops have stepped out of our midst 
into the service of the Church Eternal. 
Though separated from our immediate 
presence, these stalwart ministers of 
Jesus Christ are still bound to us all in 
warm bonds of love, affection and com- 
mon purpose which mark the com- 
munion of saints: 



Name 

William Clyde Martin 
Walter Earl Ledden 
Charles Franklin Golden 
Fred Pierce Corson 
Shot Kumar Mondol 
Robert Edward Goodrich, Jr 
Marjorie Swank Matthews 
Walter Lee Underwood 
James Chess Lovern 
Finis Alonzo Crutchfield. Jr. 
Hermann Walter Kaebnick 



Date of Death 

Aug. 30, 1984 
Oct. 20, 1984 
Nov. 17, 1984 
Feb. 16, 1985 
June 10, 1985 
Oct. 30. 1985 
June 30, 1986 
Apr. 17, 1987 
Apr. 23, 1987 
May 21. 1987 
May 25, 1987 




The Episcopal Address, like many 
things in the United Methodist Church, 
started by accident. It was a humdrum 
day at the General Conference of 1812- 
they had been struggling with the peren- 
nial question of the appointment of 
presiding elders. Suddenly Bishop Wil- 
liam McKendree took the floor-he was 
four years in the episcopacy--and 
proceeded to deliver what is now con- 
sidered the first Episcopal Address. He 
sat down. Father Asbury, in the chair, 
was fuming. Glaring across at Mc- 
Kendree, he said: "I have something to 
say to you before the conference. This is 
a new thing. I never did business in this 
way, and why is this new thing intro- 
duced?" 2 

McKendree, with the kind of agile epis- 
copal diplomacy which has served his 
successors ever since, replied: 'You are 
our father: we are your sons. You never 
have had need of it. I am only a brother, 
and have need of it." ^ 

Asbury smiled, and a new tradition 
was born. 

This story typifies the United 
Methodist Church -like Asbury, we often 
say "We never did it this way before." But 
the Holy Spirit in a variety of forms has 
a way of breaking through old barriers 
toward the fulfillment of God's purpose 
for us. 

Perspective 

Four years ago, we, all of us, celebrated 
the Bicentennial of American 
Methodism. It was natural for us in 1984 
to celebrate all that had gone before-the 
matchless saga of heroes and heroines of 
the church "who through faith con- 
quered kingdoms, enforced justice, 
received promises, stopped the mouths 
of lions, . . . won strength out of weak- 
ness " * It was appropriate in 1984 to 



celebrate those brave women and men 
who walked this way before us, and we 
celebrate them now. 

But tonight we stand 12 years from the 
21st century, and we mtist focus our 
vision on the road which lies ahead. For 
if anything is clear at this moment of his- 
tory, it is that God has momentous 
things in mind for the people called 
United Methodists. Let us address our- 
selves to some basic questions of identity 
and direction. 

Who Are We? 

To ask this question is to be reminded 
of the matrushka, the unique doll made 
by the Russians, the doll within a doll, 
within a doll. For we possess identities 
within identities, within identities. 

Who are we? In our larger identity, we 
are members of the human family- 
human beings, made in the image of 
God- five billion of us, "riders on the 
earth together." God made us in order 
that we might "glorify God, and enjoy 
him forever." ^ And now God's creation 
is in danger, imperiled by the very beings 
God created "to have dominion." We 
must ask the question, "Have thousands 
of years of himian history come to this- 
that we have in our possession weapons 
of terror which could effectively destroy 
life for all five billion of us?" That we 
should live together so long and learn so 
little is eloquent testimony to the reality 
and the pervasive power of human sin. 

In the name of God and the 
humankind created in God's image, we 
implore the leaders and rulers of the na- 
tions to lay down their arsenals of death 
and seek anew together the oneness of 
the human community. 

The United Nations, imperfect and 
fragile as it is, remains the most viable 
symbol of the deep desire of peoples 
everywhere to resolve their differences 
not by sending their young out to 
slaughter one another, but by sitting 
down together at tables of mediation and 
reconciliation. We affirm a strengthened 
United Nations. 

This human family is further 
threatened by the emergence of Ac- 
quired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
(AIDS). This disease is causing immense 
suffering among people all over our 
world. We declare our unconditional 
love for persons with AIDS and their 
families, and affirm all efforts toward 
fuller understanding and deeper com- 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



79 



passion, as well as the funding of re- 
search to discover a cure. 

In this five-billion member family, two 
economic systems vie for ascendancy. 
Both grew out of particular historical 
contexts and have made important con- 
tributions to the question of how the 
management of economic forces can 
contribute to the good of humanity. But 
the events of history are calling both sys- 
tems into question. As an anonymous 
person in Poland put it recently: "In 
capitalism man exploited man, and 
under communism vice versa!" Today, 
both systems are found morally wanting: 
communism, because it has faOed both 
economically and in its inability to 
guarantee the most basic human rights 
of free speech, free press, and free 
religion; capitalism because of its failure 
to cope with the growing numbers of 
homeless people, the expanding world 
population living in poverty, and the 
erosion of the middle class, mostly into 
the ranks of the poor. While these sys- 
tems have been modified and continue to 
be modified in many places to remove 
some of their harsher edges, the world 
looks with longing for a better way for 
this five billion member world com- 
munity to share the enormous resources 
God has made available for us. We 
believe this better way must be based on 
the God-given freedom and dignity of 
each person, on standards of truth and 
justice among peoples and nations, and 
the abolition of the racism, sexism and 
militarism so prevalent in the systems of 
today. 

Furthermore, no "new system" can 
change anything if it is not accompanied 
by a profound sense that we are sisters 
and brothers in a global community 
under God, called to respond in love to 
hunger and homelessness and human 
need wherever it appears. 

Who are we? In slightly smaller iden- 
tity, we are members of a world com- 
munity of those who believe in God- 
some 2 1/2 bOlion of us. ' Among this 
community are Buddhists, Hindus, Mus- 
lims, Jews and many others. We have sig- 
nificant differences with them and cer- 
tain barriers divide us. But our com- 
monalities are profound. Chinese 
religious leaders found this out the hard 
way during the "Cultural Revolution" of 
1966-1976. Their houses of worship were 
closed; they themselves were arrested 
and sent to the countryside to till the soil. 
Often, they were placed in barracks 
together, and here the Islamic imam, the 
Buddhist priest, the Jewish rabbi, the 
Catholic priest and the Protestant pastor 
broke bread together, washed the dishes 
together, cleaned the latrines together, 
suffered together, and came to love one 
another. So that today, returned now to 



their houses of worship and their min- 
istries, there exists a bond of mutual af- 
fection and respect and caring which has 
transformed the religious community 
there. 

Do we have to wait until there is a 
world catastrophe before the leaders of 
the world religions will find their com- 
mon humanity? Surely the overwhelm- 
ing nuclear threat is enough to drive us 
together and to find our commonality of 
compassion. What an impact it could 
have if the 2 1/2 billion people of our 
earth who are believers in God could 
speak with one voice for peace on earth! 

Who are we? We are members of the 
Christian church, some 1,062,000,000 
members strong.* We are part of an in- 
credible array and variety of persons 
living in every countiy on the face of the 
earth bound together by our common al- 
legiance to Jesus Christ as our Lord and 
Savior. In some places our brothers and 
sisters gather under threat of repression 
and persecution, and we lift our prayers 
for them tonight. We pray for them in 
the sure knowledge that God's church 
will be preserved to the end of time, and 
that nothing can separate us from one 
another or from the love of Christ. 

One of the concrete ways in which we 
symbolize our membership in this world 
Christian community is through our 
membership in the World Council of 
Churches. While we clearly recognize the 
fallibility of the World Council and of na- 
tional councils of churches, we strongly 
affirm our United Methodist commit- 
ment to such conciliar bodies as a way of 
declaring our essential oneness in Christ 
with his followers everywhere. 

Who are we? We are United- 
Methodists, some 9 1/2 million of us. ^ 
We should be proud to be United 
Methodists! Not in a chauvinistic sense 
-not in the sense that we are better than 
someone else or that we have some kind 
of comer on the truth-nothing could be 
further from the spirit of our founders. 
Rather, our pride might better be 
described as a sense of joy and gratitude 
that we are privileged to be a part of a 
movement within Christ's church which 
has had and continues to have an impact 
for good far beyond what its numbers 
would indicate. 

United Methodists are Christians who 
have lifted up certain emphases of the 
gospel, emphases which have possessed 
a power to reach out and change the lives 
of people. Bishop Charles Wesley Flint 
once made this summary of Methodist 
conviction: 

1. Everyone can be a child of God. ^° 

2. If you're a child of God, you'll know 
it. 

3. If you're a child of God, you'll show 
it. 



"Everyone can be a child of God." 
While Bishop Flint was aware that in 
one sense everyone is already a child of 
God by virtue of being lovingly created 
by Grod in God's image, he was speaking 
of a more profound relationship. Free 
grace! Whosoever will may come! This 
invitation extends across all the barriers 
and the chasms that divide human 
beings from human beings. And-amaz- 
ing truth!-even though we, in our sinful 
and selfish state, may not be able to ac- 
cept this gift, the grace of God has al- 
ready come into our hearts that enables 
us to say "yes!" Prevenient grace! Bishop 
Flint was right-everyone can be a child 
of God! 

"If you're a child of God," said Flint, 
"you'll know it." Christian assurance! If 
there is one reason which explains our 
failure to evangelize in recent years, it 
may be this. For how can United 
Methodists share the good news with 
someone else, if they are not sure that 
they have accepted the good news into 
their own hearts, and that it has 
revolutionized their lives? There is no 
chance of reversing our membership 
trends, let alone of doubling our mem- 
bership, until there comes a resurgence 
of assurance-an assurance of God's love 
so compelling that I've got to share it 
with my neighbor. "If you're a child of 
God, you'll know it." 

Finally, Bishop Flint says, "If you're a 
child of God, you'll show it." Christian 
perfection! This may be the most distinc- 
tive of the Wesleyan emphases, and we 
are constantly in peril of turning it into 
a kind of "works righteousness," in 
which, out of guilt, we busily engage in 
activism. But rightly understood, going 
on to perfection is a grateful response to 
having received God's grace and love in 
our hearts and lives, and is one of the 
most powerful and central themes of 
Wesleyan theology. It remains the most 
significant motivating force behind both 
personal holiness and social holiness. It 
has served as the mainspring that has 
made the United Methodist Church 
among the most vital and socially in- 
volved denominations in the Christian 
world. Yes, "if you're a child of God, 
you'll show it." 

The time has come to say the last rites 
over the notion that the defining charac- 
teristic of United Methodist theology is 
pluralism. The word may have some 
descriptive value, but it has no defming 
value. It carries philosophical overtones 
which contradict our understanding of 
Christian faith. The dictionary defmes it 
as "a theory or system that recognizes 
more than one ultimate substance or 
principle." ^ ^ It is little wonder then that 
many people, including some United 
Methodists, have been led to believe that 



80 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



"United Methodists can believe anything 
they want to." That is simply not true. 

This is not to deny that we have many 
differing perspectives and interpreta- 
tions of Christian faith. It is only to say 
that we should be defining ourselves 
more along the lines of Bishop Flint's 
suggestions than by the use of mislead- 
ing terms borrowed from philosophy 
which give a false impression of who we 
are. This is essential both for our own 
self-understanding as well as for our 
ability to evangelize. There is no evan- 
gelistic appeal to join a group whose prin- 
ciple identifying mark is that everyone 
disagrees with everyone else. 

We look with hope and anticipation to 
the reports from the three study commis- 
sions on mission, ministry, and our 
theological task, for they can help us in 
this task of self-definition. 

So, who are we? We are 9 1/2 million 
United Methodists, a part of 
1,062,000,000 Christians within a com- 
munity of 2 1/2 billion people who 
believe in God, and finally we are mem- 
bers of the human family of five billion 
souls. In each of these identities which 
God has given us, we face both great 
perils and supreme opportunities. 

Where Have We Been? 

Four years ago at our Bicentennial, we 
celebrated our past. We rejoiced in the 
memories of Wesley and Asbury, of Ot- 
terbein and Albright, of Boehm and 
Hosier and Heck. We gloried in the tales 
of circuit riders who died young, and of 
lay people whose courage and faith led 
them to break new ground for mission 
and ministry. This is a history we must 
never forget, and we acknowledge our in- 
debtedness to all the marchers in that 
endless line of splendor. 

But tonight we mark 20 years since the 
1968 union which brought The Evangeli- 
cal United Brethren Church and The 
Methodist Church together. Those who 
were present at Dallas for that Uniting 
Conference will never forget the drama 
of that high hour. 

As we ask the question, "Where have 
we been?" let us center our attention on 
where we have been in these past 20 
years. 

We have been down the road of reor- 
ganization. The first task which the 
"New Church for a New World" set for it- 
self was a restructuring of its general 
agencies. A commission created in 1968 
worked throughout the quadrennium 
and brought its report to the 1972 
General Conference, where it was 
debated and adopted. That structure, 
with few changes, remains substantially 
intact today. We believe that the general 
agencies are working well together, and 



that cooperation continues to grow. It is 
always difficult to know whether such 
cooperation is due to structure or to the 
personnel who fill key places in the struc- 
ture, but we expect the latter is the more 
important. At any rate, while not 
precluding the possibility that changes 
should be made, the structures adopted 
in 1972 have served us well. 

During these 20 years, we have 
travelled the road of self-examination. 
We refer to the fact that it was at the 1968 
Uniting Conference, held in the wake of 
the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther 
King Jr., that the Commission on 
Religion and Race was created. Four 
years later the Commission on the Status 
and Role of Women came into being, first 
as a temporary four-year body, and then 
as a standing commission. The creation 
of these two bodies by the General Con- 
ference represent the first time that our 
church had, on an ongoing basis, 
provided ways of examining ourselves - 
our own structures, methods and ways of 
doing things - to help us move to a more 
authentic practice of the inclusiveness 
we preach to others. This move has been 
controversial, and critics sometimes ac- 
cuse us of "navel gazing." But the need to 
create these agencies is a testimony to 
the reality of sin, and our willingness to 
sustain them is a sign of our need for self- 
examination of our own practices if we 
are to be effective in proclaiming the 
gospel to the world. We believe we have 
made some progress in these 20 years, 
but it is abundantly clear that the task is 
far from accomplished. To practice our- 
selves the inclusiveness we preach 
remains high on our agenda. 

These past two decades have seen the 
emergence of a more aggressive epis- 
copal leadership, culminating in the 1986 
pastoral letter, "In Defense of Creation: 
The Nuclear Crisis and a Just Peace." 
This letter, two years in preparation, was 
produced by the Council of Bishops in 
close cooperation with our general 
boards and agencies, and has made a 
greater impact on church and society 
than almost anything the church has at- 
tempted in decades. The Council of 
Bishops believes that the church is call- 
ing upon its leaders to lead and has 
sought to respond to that challenge. But 
the whole church needs to clarify its ex- 
pectations, so that this emerging epis- 
copal leadership can truly be understood 
as a servanthood on behalf of all who 
bear the name United Methodist and of 
all those whom we would serve. 

One of the most significant develop- 
ments of this 20-year period has been the 
concept of the missional priority. First 
adopted in 1976, the priority for the first 
quadrennium was threefold: 



1. Developing the Ethnic Minority 
Local Church 

2. World Hunger 

3. Evangelism 

After 1980 and through the present, 
the one priority has been "Developing 
and Strengthening the Ethnic Minority 
Local Church for Witness and Mission." 
A summary of what has been ac- 
complished during these three quadren- 
nia cannot begin to measure the real im- 
pact of this priority on the life of our 
church, but these figures give us some 
idea of the scope of this historic effort. 
A total of 2,746 different projects 
received funding in the amount of 
$39,440,164. 

The Hispanic-Asian-Native American 
(HANA) scholarship program, initiated 
through EMLC, has provided scholar- 
ships for 793 Hispanic-Americans, 902 
Asian-Americans, and 225 Native 
Americans in the amount of 
$3,336,225.00.12 

Furthermore, the portion of funds 
retained by annual conferences has 
made possible significant gains. Reports 
from 41 conferences show 116 new con- 
gregations started, 85 new churches 
built, 56 parsonages erected and 289 
elders ordained. 1^ 

It is impossible to assess what the ul- 
timate impact of this priority has been 
on the life of ethnic minority local chur- 
ches. Honesty calls for us to admit that 
some in our church have not been en- 
thusiastic about the priority. Neverthe- 
less, its overall effect has been notable, 
and when the history of The United 
Methodist Church for the last half of the 
20th century is written, the missional 
priority "Developing and Strengthening 
the Ethnic Minority Local Church for 
Witness and Mission" will stand as a 
major enterprise on behalf of inclusive 
outreach in the church of Jesus Christ. 

As we ask where we have been these 
last 20 years, we have to acknowledge we 
have been on a constant downhill slide 
in our membership. This is not true 
everywhere, particularly in lands outside 
the United States. But what is incon- 
trovertible is that when the delegates 
came to the General Conference at Dal- 
las 20 years ago, they came representing 
a church of 10,994,403 members. ^^ In 
1988, you came representing a church of 
9,696,797 members. ^^ What happened 
to those 1,297,606 people? We have all 
heard many theories advanced, and it is 
not simple to sort out the reasons. One 
fact seems clear, however, from the ob- 
jective studies which have been made. 
That is that the loss in membership has 
not been due to abnormally large num- 
bers of people leaving our ranks, but 
rather to a greatly diminished number of 
people entering our ranks. Respon- 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



81 



sibility, then, lies with our over 42 
thousand local congregations, for that is 
where people are evangelized, made dis- 
ciples, and nurtured in the faith. 

But we all share in the responsibility, 
and whatever priorities or special 
programs this General Conference 
adopts, empowering local congregations 
to make disciples has to be a first order 
of the day. 

Finally, we have maintained a remark- 
able level of giving to the local and con- 
nectional ministries of our church. 
Despite heavy pressures for localism, our 
congregations and their leaders have un- 
derstood that the fullness of mission 
calls us to connectional ministries in 
Christ's name. We are grateful for this 
loving and loyal response toward em- 
powerment of our common ministry. 

We have been over a fascinating road 
these 20 years since union - we have 
restructured our boards and agencies, we 
have instituted a self-examination of our 
own inclusiveness so that our message 
might be more authentic. We have asked 
our bishops to assume a greater leader- 
ship role. We have undertaken a mis- 
sional priority which is without parallel 
in other major religious bodies. We come 
to this conference with 1,297,606 fewer 
members than we had 20 years ago. And 
we celebrate the loyal stewardship of our 
people. This is where we have been. 

Where Are We Going? 

1. We are going to be a more evangeli- 
cal church. We are aware that this term 
is subject to a variety of definitions, but 
here we mean simply this: A profound 
conviction of the power and efficacy of 
God's good news of love in Christ to 
change, redeem and transform human 
life. The end result is holiness of heart 
and life, both for individuals and com- 
munities. We have not said much in 
recent years about personal holiness, 
particularly as it relates to personal 
habits. Take the matter of the use of 
tobacco and alcohol for instance ~ for a 
variety of reasons, perhaps from fear of 
appearing legalistic, we have backed 
away from these issues. But while we 
have been doing that, the community 
has not - so that today, 73 percent of 
adults in the United States abstain from 
tobacco, and the percentage is rising. ^^ 
In regard to alcohol, the percentage of 
abstaining adults is at 35 percent and the 
rising concern for health and highway 
safety point toward an increasing num- 
ber of non-drinkers in the future. ^ It is 
ironic that in this, as often in other so- 
cial issues, the church is not leading but 
tagging along behind. This is but one ex- 
ample of the biblical idea of holiness 
which sees our bodies as temples of God's 



spirit. It is out of this profound biblical 
conviction that we re-affirm the stan- 
dard spelled out in our 1984 Episcopal 
Address and in the actions of the General 
Conference of fidelity in marriage and 
celibacy in singleness. Holiness is truly 
wholeness, a concept which exalts the 
sacredness of human life and love, as well 
as the environment in which we live and 
move and have our being. A more evan- 
gelical church ~ a church concerned with 
holiness of heart and life ~ will take 
leadership in every move toward health 
and wholeness, in joyous gratitude for 
the gift of God's love in Christ. 

A more evangelical church will possess 
what our forebears called a "passion for 
souls." By this we mean that we hurt for 
every person who has not accepted and 
experienced the love of God in his or her 
heart and who does not know the trans- 
forming joy of being a part of Christ's 
beloved community. A more evangelical 
church will proclaim God's good news 
with loving and persuasive power. 

A more evangelical church will be 
deeply concerned about nurturing grow- 
ing disciples, knowing that God's 
redeeming love often is not absorbed in- 
stantaneously, but may be received and 
understood as a person prays and studies 
and experiences the loving ministry of 
the community of faith. A more evangeli- 
cal church will believe that every dis- 
ciple, by God's grace, should be a grow- 
ing disciple. 

2. We are going to be a more socially 
responsible church. Those persons who 
interpret being more evangelical as 
being a retreat from activism just don't 
understand The United Methodist 
Church. For it is the acceptance of God's 
good news of love in our hearts that 
motivates us to bring that good news to 
bear on every part and aspect of God's 
creation, including our political life 
together. We cannot exclude any feature 
of God's creation from the applicability 
of the good news without blasphemous- 
ly discounting the cosmic scope and 
authority of that good news. We rejoice 
that for 80 years, since 1908, we have had 
a Social Creed which expresses this full- 
ness of God's purpose. We undertake this 
ministry not in the belief that our efforts 
will establish God's kingdom, but as 
cooperators with God as God brings to 
fruition that shalom marked by freedom, 
truth, justice and love-a shalom revealed 
most clearly to us in the life, death and 
resurrection of Jesus Christ. Therefore, 
a church that is truly evangelical will be 
one which is authentically activist in its 
application of the gospel. 

3. We are going to be a singing church. 
This has always been one of our marks, 
for it represents a way of saying the un- 
sayable and speaking the unspeakable. 



The work of the Hymnal Revision Com- 
mittee which you created in 1984 will be 
before you for action, an action which 
will determine the hjTnns we will be 
singing into the 21st century. We com- 
mend the Hymnal Revision Committee 
for having conducted the most thorough 
and open process of hymnal revision in 
modem history and urge your thought- 
ful consideration of their report. 

4. We are going to be a more inclusive 
church. We are grateful for forward 
strides made in recent years, both in eth- 
nic and gender inclusiveness. But when 
we measure what we have done against 
what God is calling us to do, we bow in 
contrition. Breaking through subtle bar- 
riers of racism, sexism and ageism takes 
a deliberate intentionality that we have 
not yet been able fully to muster. For all 
our efforts these three quadrennia on be- 
half of our missional priority, we must 
confess that for large numbers of United 
Methodists the missional priority never 
came alive as anything more than one 
more apportionment. But we are hear- 
tened by the directions emerging from 
the Convocation on Racism convened 
last September in Louisville, and we 
pledge ourselves to unremitting opposi- 
tion to racism in all its forms. 

Our ethnic richness continues to 
proliferate with the ongoing arrival in 
the United States of thousands of im- 
migrant people. Our future as a church 
is closely tied to the effectiveness of our 
evangelization of ethnic peoples. 
Whatever the action of the General Con- 
ference is regarding a missional priority, 
the developing and strengthening of the 
ethnic minority local church must and 
will remain at the heart of our mission. 

We feel compelled to say however, that 
strengthening of the ethnic minority 
congregation does not minimize our 
commitment to the development and 
growth of racially and ethnically in- 
clusive congregations. Effective evan- 
gelization will enable us to have both 
strong ethnic congregations as well as 
those that are interracial. 

We are grateful for the increasing par- 
ticipation of women at all levels of our 
life together, and rejoice that the mem- 
bership of this General Conference 
reflects this growing reality. The con- 
tribution being made by increasing num- 
bers of clergywomen is bringing new life 
and vitality throughout the connection. 

5. We are going to be a more global 
church. We are in the process of a long 
evolution in this regard. Originally, we 
were strictly a North American church. 
Then, largely as a result of the work of 
our missionaries, congregations and an- 
nual conferences were established in 
other nations. But bishops from the 
United States presided over these con- 



82 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



ferences. Then came missionary bishops 
and later Central Conference bishops, 
but they were never quite given the 
status of a bishop elected by a jurisdic- 
tional conference. Only in the past 15 
years have we finally recognized that 
bishops elected by Central Conferences 
are truly full bishops of The United 
Methodist Church. Only since 1972 have 
we provided for non-episcopal members 
from the Central Conferences on 
General Council on Ministries, and only 
since 1984 on other boards and agencies. 

But we are now at a time in history 
when we should move decisively toward 
being an authentic global church. One 
reality leading us in that direction is that 
while our membership has been declin- 
ing in the United States, it is growing in 
other countries. If present trends con- 
tinue, sometime in the 21st century 
there could occur a quantum shift in our 
membership. We should be preparing for 
that by becoming more fully global. 

6. We are going to be a more connec- 
tional church. Dean Walter Muelder 
used to quote Joseph Fletcher to the ef- 
fect that the world ecumenical move- 
ment was made up of about 200 people 
in the world. What he meant by this was 
that if you counted the people in the 
world who were really excited about the 
world ecumenical movement, it was the 
200 people who went to all those meet- 
ings.^« 

There is a corollary with connec- 
tionalism here. Yes, we are excited about 
connectionalism — the Council of 
Bishops, the members of the General 
Conference, thestaff and directors of our 
general boards and agencies ~ at the 
most, three or four thousand people, less 
than 1/10 of one percent of all United 
Methodists. Even if we include all the lay 
and clergy members of annual conferen- 
ces and annual conference boards and 
jigencies, we may be speaking of 80 or 90 
thousand people ~ still less than 1% of 
our membership. What about the other 
99 percent of oiu- people? Does connec- 
tionalism really excite them or do they 
consider it a code word used by "the 
hierarchy" to justify larger apportion- 
ments? We suspect the latter view is 
more widespread than we would like to 
believe. 

Furthermore, connectionalism is 
sometimes identified with a monolithic 
conformity which discourages dissent 
and discussion of alternative views. But 
true connectionalism should encourage 
the free expression of a variety of views, 
and provide a reconciling arena where all 
come together in mutual respect and 
love. 

In fact, connectionalism is an operat- 
ing principle which has made it possible 
for over 42,000 local congregations to be 



involved in the mission of Christ in a 
focused and effective way that is often 
the envy of other denominations. Con- 
nectionalism is a priceless gift which 
must not be abandoned but rather 
strengthened. But we need to find ways 
to make connectionalism come alive in 
the minds and hearts of the large per- 
centage of our members for whom it is 
only a word. They need to catch the 
vision of being a part of a great adven- 
ture on behalf of Christ and Christ's mis- 
sion. We are going to be a more connec- 
tional church, and what is more, the 
average lay person in the pews is going 
to know that and be excited about it, and 
that can revolutionize our mission. 

7. We are going to redeem and renew 
the itineracy. While we recognize that 
many different means of clergy deploy- 
ment are utilized in different denomina- 
tions, we affirm the unique role of 
itineracy in our own heritage. Itineracy 
has been a powerful instrument for mis- 
sion, but it has come under increasing 
pressures in the last two decades. There 
are some who frankly question its adap- 
tability to the present age and call either 
for sharp modification or outright aban- 
donment. Many others believe the sys- 
tem should be renewed and 
strengthened. The future of itineracy 
depends on how we answer some basic 
questions: 

A. Is the itineracy basically an employ- 
ment agency for clergy or an instrument 
for Christ's mission? The expectation 
often laid on bishops and cabinets is that 
"taking care of the clergy" far outranks 
in priority serving the needs of congrega- 
tions and ministries. To the extent 
bishops have allowed such expectations 
to rule our decisions, we share respon- 
sibility for failures of the itinerant sys- 
tem to be a truly missional instrument. 
Some of the responsibility also lies with 
attitudes of some congregations and cler- 
gy- 

Itineracy is based on the assumption of 
itinerants who are ready-yea, who long 
to be sent and used in God's mission ac- 
cording to their gifts and graces, and of 
congregations who are ready to accept 
their appointed pastor as one particular- 
ly fitted to meet their unique needs. To 
put it another way, there will not be a 
renewal of itineracy without a profoimd 
spiritual, theological and ecclesiological 
renewal of both itinerant clergy and of 
congregations. 

B. Can the itineracy be renewed when 
considerable numbers of itinerant mini- 
sters declare themselves de facto non- 
itinerant? The answer must be no, be- 
cause one of the assumptions of itineracy 
is equality of opportunity for every 
itinerant to serve in any place. But if all 
the places in what are deemed the more 



attractive locations are locked up by cler- 
gy who will serve only within a limited 
area, then the truly itinerant clergy are 
destined to serve out their lifetimes in 
less desirable places. Thus two classes of 
clergy are created, itinerant and non- 
itinerant, separate and unequal, with all 
of the advantages going to the non- 
itinerant. 

We have a pastoral concern for the per- 
sonal and family situations of all ap- 
pointed clergy, yet if equity is to be res- 
tored and itineracy renewed, bishops 
and cabinets must insist that the mini- 
ster who places personal and unofficial 
limits on itineracy can have no as- 
surance ofsuch limits being honored nor 
appointment within such limits guaran- 
teed. 

C. Can the itineracy be renewed in the 
face of the enormous disparity in salaries 
paid to pastors? The impact of salary dif- 
ferential on the appointive system has 
been debated for years. At one time. The 
Book of Discipline contained provisions 
for a basic salary plan in annual con- 
ferences which wished to adopt it. But 
the option was rarely used, and the 1976 
General Conference removed it from 
The Book of Discipline. 

But we face a situation in some annual 
conferences where the setting of pas- 
toral salaries is being used as a way to 
step out of the appointive system. Al- 
though the authority to set salary rests 
with the charge conference, the danger 
of a rampant Congregationalism here 
must be recognized. One legislative ap- 
proach which might at least ameliorate 
the situation could be a disciplinary 
provision requiring a local congregation 
which wanted to raise its pastor's salary 
beyond a certain level to do so only if it 
committed an equal amount (over and 
above its apportionments) to the Equi- 
table Salary Fund. 

So, fully recognizing the stresses being 
placed upon the itineracy today and ac- 
knowledging there is much reforming 
work to be done, we nevertheless, in the 
name and for the sake of our common 
mission, commit ourselves to a renewed 
itineracy. 

8. We will be a growing church. The ac- 
tion of the 1984 General Conference set- 
ting a goal of doubling our membership 
by 1992 has been roundly criticized, with 
some justification. But that action did 
get the attention of the church, and the 
church is committed more than it has 
been in many years to becoming a grow- 
ing church. 

We believe such growth will happen 
for five basic reasons: 

I. We are under orders from Christ. 
As sharers in the great commission, we 
make disciples as part of God's plan for 
a renewed humanity. 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



83 



II. We have a sound theology. Wes- 
leyan theology based on God's grace 
reaching out to all people in their need, 
offering them Christ, and then helping 
them on the way to holiness of heart and 
life both as individuals and on the social 
scene, is a matchless instrument for the 
redemption of individuals and the heal- 
ing of the nations. 

III. We have the human resources. 
The laity and the clergy of our church 
constitute an incredible reservoir of 
people power-redeemed by Christ and 
through the power of God's spirit they 
stand ready to be used for the building of 
the church and the healing of humanity. 

rV. We have the material resources. 
There are 42,212 established congrega- 
tions, located in strategic places in our 
cities, towns, villages and open countiy. 
What an incalculable resource this is ~ a 
resource that other faiths or ideologies 
would give their eye teeth to possess. 
There we are based strategically to par- 
ticipate in God's mission to the world. 

V. We have the organization. Our 
connectional system provides a means of 
communication and accountability 
which is unmatched. It needs only to be 
put to work anew in the service of the 
Spirit. 

But one thing is needful ~ a profound 
longing and desire to grow - based not 
upon institutional aggrandizement, but 
on our understanding of God's purpose 
- to bring all persons to Christ. 

9. We are going on to perfection! This 
United Methodist emphasis, often 
misunderstood by others, sometimes 
looked upon with condescension even by 
some of our own family, actually 
provides for us our most powerful 
motivation for mission and our greatest 
reason for hope. Jesus would not have 
commanded us to be perfect if he didn't 
want and expect us to give it our best, 
and he accepts our best as a contribution 
to the coming of the Kingdom. 

United Methodism, at its greatest, has 
never been willing to give up on perfec- 
tion. And so we say to you tonight, rep- 
resentatives of a great church poised on 
the brink of an open future, "Never lose 
faith that the Christ who calls you to be 
perfect will honor your efforts, however 
feeble. "For 

"The kingdom is coming 

O tell ye the story, 

God's banner exalted shall be! 

The earth shall be full 

of His knowledge and glory, 
As waters that cover the sea." ^^ 

The struggle may be long, the way 
hard, the immediate results discourag- 
ing, but in those times remember the an- 
cient words of the sursum corda, which 
mean literally, "Up, hearts!" 



Up hearts! Hatred and violence and 
war may seem to rule the world, but we 
are a part of God's long range plan to 
beat swords into ploughshares, and 
spears into pruning hooks, and to create 
a world where a little child can lead us! 

Up, hearts! Life around us may be 
characterized by persons excluding 
other persons because of their different- 
ness, but we are a part of God's grand 
plan where we shall all sit down at the 
table of the Lord together! 

Up hearts! We live in a world where 
the rich seem to get richer and the poor 
poorer, but we are the followers of One 
who has "put down the mighty from 
their thrones, and exalted them of low 
20 



Up hearts! We are going on to perfec- 
tion! 

"And when the strife is fierce. 

The warfare long ~ 

Steals on the ear the distant triumph 
song 

And hearts are brave again. 

And arms are strong. 

Alleluia, Alleluia! ^r 

In the name of the Father, and the 
Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen. 

Footnotes 

1 Inclusive Language Lectionary: 
Readings for Year C, (Colossians 1:13- 
20). Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1985. p. 
235 (adapted). 

2 Buckley, James M. A History of 
Methodism in the United States, (Vol. 1). 
New York: The Christian Literature Co., 
1897. p. 409. 

3 Ibid. 

4 The Holy Bible: Revised Standard 
Version, (Hebrews 11: 33-34). New York: 
Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1952. p. 254. 

5 Steel, Robert. The Shorter 
Catechism. London: T. Nelson & Sons, 
1888. p. 9. 

6 Steven, Stewart. The Poles. New 
York: Macmillan, 1982. p. 12. 

7 Hoffman, Mark S. (Ed.). 1987 World 
Almanac & Book of Facts. New York: 
Scripps Howard Co., 1986. p. 340. 

8 Ibid. 

9 1986 General Minutes of the Annual 
Conferences of the United Methodist 
Church. Evanston: General Council on 
Finance & Administration, 1987. p. 26, 
29. 

10 Flint, Charles Wesley. Charles Wes- 
ley & His Colleagues. Washington D.C.: 
Public Affairs Press, 1957. p. 97. 

11 Barnhart, Clarence L. (Ed.). The 
American College Dictionary. New York: 
Random House, 1957. p. 933. 

12 Current, Angella. (1988, March). 
[HANA Scholarship Program 1977- 
1987]. General Board of Higher Educa- 



tion & Ministry, The United Methodist 
Church, Unpublished raw data. 

13 MUler, Leonard. (1988, Jan.). [Mis- 
sional Priority-the EMLC]. General 
Council on Ministries, The United 
Methodist Church. Unpublished raw 
data. 

14 1968 General Minutes of the Annual 
Conferences of the United Methodist 
Church. Evanston: The Council on 
World Service & Finance, 1969. pp. 29, 
66, 67. 

15 1987 General Minutes of the Annual 
Conferences of the United Methodist 
Church. Evanston: The Council on 
Finance & Administration, 1988. p.29. 

16 Cigarette-smoking rate at all time 
low in U.S. (1987, Sept. 11). Sacramento 
Union, p. A-3. 

17 Gallup, George, Jr. (1987, August 
24). Americans Are Drinking About as 
Much as Ever. San Francisco Chronicle. 
p. 19. 

18 Muelder, Walter. Dean Emeritus, 
Boston School of Theology (personal 
communication, fall 1987.) 

19 "From all the dark places," The 
Methodist Hymnal. Nashville: The 
Methodist Publishing House, 1939. p. 
483. 

20 The Holy Bible: Revised Standard 
Version, (Luke 1:52). New York: Thomas 
Nelson & Sons, 1952. p. 63. 

2 1 "For All the Saints," The Methodist 
Hymnal. Nashville: The Methodist 
Publishing House, 1966. p. 536. 




The Episcopal Address has been writ- 
ten by Bishop Jack M. Tuell who was 
selected by the Council of Bishops. It has 
been perfected for presentation at the 
1988 session of the General Conference 
after considerable preparation, includ- 
ing discussion and debate at regular 
meetings of the Council of Bishops. 
Though not reflecting the view of every 
bishop at every point, in finished form 
this address has been approved by the 
Council of Bishops of The United 
Methodist Church. 



84 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



Proceedings of the 1988 General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church 



Opening Session 

Tuesday Afternoon, 

April 26, 1988 

The 1988 General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the 
Cervantes Convention Center, St. Louis, 
MO, April 26, 1988, at 1:30 p.m. with the 
College Presidents as liturgists. The com- 
munion sermon was preached by Bishop 
Earl G. Hunt, Jr. 

(Service of Holy Communion) 



BISHOP EARL G. HUNT, JR (Presid- 
ing): Dear friends, in a moment I am going 
to call the General Conference to order. 
Will you find your seats immediately, 
please? Thank you. 

The General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church will come to order. As 
we come for these 1988 sessions, a proper 
prayer in which to engage might be that 
the character and the performance of this 
great General Conference may be such as 
that in this year of the Aldersgate anniver- 
sary, the General Conference of 1988 may 
be remembered as the Aldersgate General 
Conference. I recognize the secretary of 
the General Conference, Dr. Faith 
Richardson, for matters related to the roll 
call and the quorum. 

DR. FAITH RICHARDSON: Bishop 
Hunt, 994 voting delegates were elected to 
this 1988 General Conference. This would 
make a quorum of 498 in order to do busi- 
ness. As of now, we have 964 present; cer- 
tainly we have a quorum. The roll call will 
be taken in accordance with the plan of or- 
ganization. Heads of delegations have 
received the roll call information at your 
places, with all the instructions you need, 
I believe. Thank you. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you, Dr. 
Richardson. And now we turn to the 
report of the Commission on the General 
Conference, Miss Francis Alguire, Dr. De- 
Wayne Woodring, and Dr. Clifford Droke, 
associated with her. 

FRANCIS ALGUIRE (Northern Il- 
linois): I ask you to hear these words from 

1 Corinthians 12:6, "...there are varieties 
of working, but it is the same God who in- 



spires them all in every one." Please share 
in a moment of prayer. 

(Prayer) 

FRANCIS ALGUIRE: Bishop Hunt, 
members of the Council of Bishops, 
delegates, officials, and visitors, members 
of the Commission on the General Con- 
ference extend personal greetings and a 
warm welcome to each one of you. This is 
a most significant conference for several 
reasons. We come together as Christians 
to discern God's direction for the future as 
we enact legislative guidelines. 

In 1984, we celebrated our 200th an- 
niversary as a church. Welcome to this 
first conference of our third century and 
the 250th anniversary of Wesley's 
Aldersgate experience. We are pleased to 
be celebrating the 200th anniversary of 
The United Methodist Publishing House 
in 1989. Our many thanks to the persons 
providing the very useful tote bags in 
recognition of this event, as well as the 
lovely commemorative hymnals. Among 
the many other causes for celebration are 
the 200th anni...the 100th anniversary of 
the first women elected to General Con- 
ference. Even though the (ap- 
plause). ..even though the brethren of that 
era would not allow them to be seated. We 
rejoice that almost one-third of our cur- 
rent delegates are female and women are 
involved in many General Conference 
leadership roles. Eighty years ago our first 
Social Creed was adopted. We celebrate 
the 40th anniversary of the Advance 
program. Twenty years ago we became 
United Methodists, we also celebrate 20 
years of Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal, and the Ministerial Education 
Fund. 

The Commission on the General Con- 
ference has the responsibility of determin- 
ing the time and place of General 
Conference and making all the arrange- 
ments for its sessions. You will find the 
names of the members of the commission 
listed on page A-5 of the Advance Edition 
of the Daily Christian Advocate and the 
names of the Missouri Area Local Com- 
mittee on page A-6. These persons have 
worked together carefully and prayerfully 
to prepare for your arrival. Later, during 
the conference, they will be presented to 



you. Each one of them deserves much of 
our gratitude. We were very.. .we very 
much appreciate the gracious hospitality 
extended by our local hosts and hostesses. 
At this time we are privileged to receive of- 
ficial greetings from the Missouri Area 
host bishop. May I present to you Bishop 
W. T. Handy, Jr. 

BISHOP HUNT: Bishop Handy. 
BISHOP W. T. HANDY: Members of 
the conference, Ruth and I bring you 
greetings from the Missouri East Annual 
Conference and welcome you to the City 
of St. Louis. The Local Committee has 
gone to great lengths in order to make 
your stay with us one of joy, and one in 
which you can do that which we will 
believe to be the wQl of God. This is under 
the leadership of the Reverend Dr. 
Gregory K. Poole. St. Louis is the home of 
many wonderful sites. It's the home of 
that magnificent engineering feat, the 
Arch. It's the home of the famed Botani- 
cal Gardens. It is the home of Forest Park, 
one of the largest parks in the United 
States of a public nature. It is the home 
also of the zoo, one of the great zoos in our 
country. And it is also the home of many 
other facilities which we will not name 
here in these facilities and on this site. 

I want to say to you that we in St. Louis 
are really proud of Methodism and this an- 
nual conference. We claim to have the 
oldest church congregation and the oldest 
church building west of the Mississippi 
River. We also believe that you will find 
the finest physical facilities and appoint- 
ments that the General Conference has 
ever had in its entire history, here in this 
and on this site. But as we sought to try to 
make things welcome for you and to bring 
the proper setting, we realized that in 1984 
we celebrated our 200th anniversary. You 
have before you the little sack, which The 
United Methodist Publishing House has 
given, which will celebrate 200 years of its 
birth and its function. But when we got to 
thinking, 204 years just didn't 
sound... didn't have the right ring, so 
therefore we decided we might have to do 
somethings differently, and you can attest 
from that which happened last night. 
Someone saw me in the hall and said, "W. 
T., Where's your hat?" I said, "Friend, I had 
the hat on last night, twice, my first and 
last time." Some of you also have asked 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



85 



what about the St. Louis Cardinals; are 
they in town? We asked that they would 
leave town in order that we would be sure 
that we would have a quorum at each ses- 
sion. 

So on behalf of the committee and on 
behalf of the Missouri East Annual Con- 
ference, again I bring you greetings and 
welcome, and also hope that these physi- 
cal surroundings will provide you the op- 
portunity to heed the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit, and that you will find and make 
decisions, the spiritual decisions which 
will help us to heed the word of Almighty 
God, and also to become the true church 
of Jesus, the Christ. Amen. (Applause) 

FRANCES ALGUIRE: Thank you very 
much, Bishop Handy. This session of the 
General Conference has been planned in 
accordance with the plan of organization, 
as listed in Section B-4 of the Advance Edi- 
tion of the Daily Christian Advocate. To 
facilitate the work of the conference, 
members of the commission recommend 
the following schedule of special activities 
for your approval. The Laity Address at 9 
a.m. on Wednesday, April 27; Missouri 
Area Programs, Sunday night, 7:30 p.m. 
on May 1; presentation of ecumenical rep- 
resentatives on Tuesday, May 3, at 9 a.m. 
Bishop Hunt, I move these recommenda- 
tions. 

BISHOP HUNT: If you will approve 
these recommendations, lift your hand. 
Opposed? And they are approved. 

FRANCES ALGUIRE: Thank you. 
Other requests for orders of the day will 
be determined by the Committee of Agen- 
da, whose names are printed on page A-13 
of the Advance Edition of the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate. Assigned seating for ofiicial 
delegates is determined by lot by the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Commission on 
General Conference. We ask that the plan 
be approved as printed in the Advanced 
Edition, Section A, of the Daily Christian 
Advocate. We further recommend that 
our commission be authorized to make ad- 
ditional seating assignments as may be 
foimd necessary. I so move these seating 
assignment recommendations. 

BISHOP HUNT: If you will approve 
these recommendations, lift your hand. 
Opposed? And they are approved. 

FRANCES ALGUIRE: Sections of the 
hall have been set aside for persons with 
handicapping conditions. Marshals will be 
pleased to direct those requiring such seat- 
ing to the appropriate sections. It is re- 
quested that there be no smoking in public 
areas during sessions of the General Con- 



ference. Food service will be provided in 
the cafeteria in Hall A throughout the 
Conference. Breakfast and lunch will be 
available each day except Sunday. Snack 
counters will also be open. Worship ser- 
vices wUl be held each weekday at 2:30 
p.m. across the street at St. Patrick's 
Church. All visitors are welcome to attend. 
We thank our director of music. Dr. 
Carlton R. Young, for his work on these 
and other worship services so carefully 
planned and coordinated throughout the 
conference. 

FRANCIS ALGUIRE: I remind you that 
announcements shall be made through 
the Daily Christian Advocate. Oral or 
projected announcements shall be 
restricted to the official operation of the 
General Conference and its Legislative 
and Administrative committees. J. 
Richard Peck, editor of the Advance Edi- 
tion and also editor of the Daily Christian 
Advocate, has spent countless hours along 
with other staff members preparing 
printed resources for us. We thank these 
staff members most sincerely. I add that 
Rich received word yesterday that his 
mother died. Please remember him and 
his family in your prayers during these 
days of bereavement. 

Members of the Commission on the 
General Conference are recommending 
that the 1988 journal be sections A-H of 
the Advance Edition of the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate, along with the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate and the approved United 
Methodist hymnal. The last section of the 
Daily Christian Advocate will contain a 
complete index to the first two volumes. 
Bound copies of the three volumes will be 
available for purchasing in one package. I 
move this recommendation. 

BISHOP HUNT: It is before you. Are 
you ready? If you will approve this recom- 
mendation, lift your hand. Opposed? And 
it is done; it is approved. 

FRANCIS ALGUIRE: The commission 
recommends that two offerings be 
received during General Conference~the 
one just received during worship and 
designated by the Council of Bishops for 
human relief in Mozambique, the second 
one to be received on Wednesday, May 4, 
in appreciation for our marshals and 
pages. I remind you that these persons are 
dedicated volunteers who provide their 
own travel and daily expenses. We are in- 
deed indebted to them. I move this recom- 
mendation. 



BISHOP HUNT: If you wUl approve 
these two offerings as indicated, lift your 
hand. Opposed? And they are approved. 

FRANCIS ALGUIRE: The inspiration- 
al backdrop that serves as a focal point of 
our conference setting was designed by an 
Indiana artist, Jerry N. Vaughn. Mr. 
Michael Cove supervised the construction 
which involved many hours of work by 
many United Methodists. We are grateful 
to them for this fine work, (applause) We 
have carefully reviewed previous evalua- 
tion forms and requests that have come to 
us for electronic voting and projection 
equipment. Thanks to careful shopping 
and firm negotiating by our business 
manager, we can respond to your request 
affirmatively. I'm going to ask Dr. De- 
Wyane Woodring to share these impor- 
tant details. First, let me say that Dr. 
Woodring, the General Conference busi- 
ness manager/executive director, has 
been most thorough in caring for all arran- 
gements. He is highly respected as a per- 
son of integrity and has saved our church 
countless dollars by his firm, fair negotia- 
tions. I have admired his thoroughness for 
detail during these past eight years that I 
have worked with him. Dr. Woodring. 

DEWAYNE WOODRING: For the first 
time in the history of the United 
Methodist General Conference, you, the 
delegate, will have the opportunity to util- 
ize and benefit from two marvels of the 
electronic age. First is the image mag- 
nification system which you have already 
experienced during the communion ser- 
vice and thus far in this plenary session. 
The enhancement of the visual images 
surrounding us should enable each person 
to feel more closely involved in the presen- 
tations, discussions and debates on the is- 
sues facing our church today. What you 
have not experienced is the utilization of 
this image magnification system for the 
purpose of helping all the attendees keep 
abreast of the discussion. When a specific 
item in the Daily Christian Advocate is 
under consideration, the page number and 
the report number will appear as you see 
illustrated at this time, (applause) You 
notice I had to look to be sure it worked. 
You will, therefore, not only have the oral 
announcement of the topic being dis- 
cussed; you will also have the visual an- 
nouncement so that all will know the 
subject on which we are focusing our at- 
tention at a particular moment. 

The second new innovation is that of 
electronic voting. For some years we have 
had in our rules of order that we shall vote 



86 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



by electronic means or by the show of 
hands. Technology has finally advanced to 
the point that this earlier wish has now be- 
come a reality. There is a response pad in 
front of each one of the voting delegates. 
Using these pads, you can vote instantly. 
There are six buttons on the face of each 
pad. However, we will only be using but- 
tons 1, 2 and 3. Button number 1 repre- 
sents a "yes" vote, button number 2 
represents a "no" vote and button number 
3 represents abstention. When a motion is 
presented for vote, a numerical 
countdown will commence on the screen. 
It is only during this countdown that votes 
can be recorded. No votes will be received 
before or after the countdown, and only 
votes cast on buttons 1, 2 or 3 will be ac- 
cepted by the system. During the 
countdown the little red light on each key 
pad will be lit. It's not yet lit, folks. It's 
coming. This is another indication that it 
is time to respond. It is possible to change 
your vote during the countdown. The com- 
puter will always accept the last number 
entered, so if you voted "yes" and you 
thought, gee, I really ought to have voted 
"no," you can change your vote while the 
countdown is showing. Please remember 
also that only one response will be taken 
from each pad. So pushing the button 10 
times will not get you 10 votes. As the 
countdown reaches zero, the voting is 
closed and a graph appears indicating the 
actual number of votes for and against as 
well as the percentage of votes "yeah" and 
"neigh" options. We now will demonstrate 
the system. 

For this purpose we will assume a mo- 
tion is before you. We request that those 
in Section A vote yes. Not yet, folks. But- 
ton number 1, right? Those in Section D 
don't like this motion and will vote no on 
button number 2. And those in the center 
two sections vote any way your heart 
desires. Bishop Himt will now call for the 
vote. 

BISHOP HUNT: The motion is sup- 
posed to be before you. Please vote now. 
(applause) The motion prevails. You folks 
out there can't believe how relieved I am. 

WOODRING: Bishop Hunt, last night 
we were going over this, and he suggested 
that we try this a second time so we might 
become accustomed to this new manner of 
voting. For this vote, all those in the cen- 
ter of the hall, Sections B and C, think of 
the petition you would really like to see 
passed. Those in Section A think about the 
one petition in all the world you would like 
to see defeated, and those in Section D, 



you're really not sure how to vote, so you 
visually flip a coin and you all vote accord- 
ingly. Bishop Hunt, wOl you please call the 
motion? 

BISHOP HUNT: Please vote now. 
Again the motion prevails. 

WOODRING: You have now ex- 
perienced the new voting system, which is 
designed to save time as well as ensure the 
accuracy of the count. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right. In the back. 
Section B, microphone 14. 

BILL WALKER (Oregon-Idaho): 
Bishop, a question about the countdown. 
Does it give enough time for the transla- 
tion to be made? I have a feeling it does 
not for some of our delegates. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right. Dr. Woodr- 
ing. 

WOODRING: The translation at that 
point is only three key words, which all the 
bishops will be utilizing: Please vote now. 
That is the only part that gets close to the 
time of the voting, so you have the three 
words. Please vote now, is the key for the 
computer system. And as we proceed, Bill, 
I would think that they would become ac- 
customed to those three key words. There 
is no speaking during the time of the 
voting. 

WALKER: Bishop, I hope that we are 
sensitive, at least as we begin to practice 
this procedure, because I really fear that 
we are mechanizing some folks out of the 
process. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you. I see one 
here, and then I'll come here. Yes, the 
woman. ..will you go to microphone 4 
please? 

JUNE GOLDMAN (Iowa): Bishop, I'd 
like to have you explain why we had only 
610 total votes recorded. I understood that 
we did have a quorum of 960 some. Either 
three hundred and some people are not 
voting, or it was not recording accurately 
the total number that were cast. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, is there an 
answer to this inquiry? 

WOODRING: Some may not be voting, 
or secondly some may not be in their seats. 
The system was tested a number of times 
and we will test it again, but if everybody 
votes it should add up to the number that 
are presently in their seats. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, was there 
a.. .that was your concern. All right, I see 
someone in the very back, a woman, 
microphone 11. 

THELMA JOHNSON (West Ohio): I 
know that we have tested the system, oh, 
I'm Thelma Johnson, West Ohio. 



BISHOP HUNT: YES 

JOHNSON: I know that we have tested 
the system, but I'm concerned about 
during the process of time is there any way 
of knowing whether or not something 
does happen to some of these that will not 
record as we begin to vote. A test that 
began, at the very beginning, I don't know 
whether it would hold through the entire 



WOODRING: The system is checked 
before and after each session. Each one of 
these buttons is checked to assure that it 
is recording. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, sir, 
microphone 4 

MILES: John MUes, Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas, I appreciate, sir... 

BISHOP HUNT: John MUes, Little 
Rock, Arkansas. 

MILES: I appreciate, sir, you testing it; 
but I would like to move that we test it 
right now and that everybody in here vote 
and let's see how many yes votes we get up 
there. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, that is a mo- 
tion. Are you ready? We will do this by 
hand. If you are in favor of the motion to 
test, lift your hand. Opposed? And we shall 
test. The motion prevails. All right, are 
you ready now? Everyone is to vote yes. 
Please vote now. Well.. .we have.. .we have 
fewer than those who are here, certainly. 
Will you comment on this, Doctor?. 

WOODRING: You can hardly imagine 
how I have been dreading this moment. 
We will check and have the people with 
the company check the electronic voting 
system again at the dose of this session 
and do it the old-fashioned way with the 
show of hands... I would suggest for the 
remainder of this session because if you 
are only getting 400.. .let me, would you 
mind, Bishop, if I asked them a question? 
Is there anyone who's keypad did not have 
the red button showing. 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes, many. 

WOODRING: OK Thank you, that 
answers some of our question right there. 

BISHOP HUNT: May I see, sir, what 
your point is? Microphone 3. 

MOORE: Roy Moore, Iowa. 

WOODRING: Roy Moore, Iowa. 

MOORE: Bishop, I have a hunch that 
we are not too slow, but we are too fast. 
People are punching that button as soon 
as you say, "Now," and before the numbers 
appear on the screen; and, Dewayne, those 
wouldn't count, would they? 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



87 



WOODRING: They would not count; 
that is correct. Anything before the 9 but- 
tons, the 9 shows, would not count. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, 

WOODRING: I think they would like to 
do it again, Bishop. 

BISHOP HUNT: I think...! think, we 
are ready to proceed at the suggestion of 
Dr. Woodring with hand voting for the 
remainder of this session and a test of the 
system at the close of the session. Is that 
what you asked for? 

WOODRING: Well, I did untU this 
gentleman mentioned that perhaps what 
was happening was a number of the 
delegates are pushing when you say -- 
"Please vote now" rather than waiting for 
the red light and the 9. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, we can test 
this very quickly. Everyone is to vote yes 
and no one is to vote until the countdown 
begins. Please vote now. I think we had 
better vote by hand for the remainder of 
this session. 

WOODRING: All right, the firm supply- 
ing this system to us indicated that we 
were the first denomination to utilize this 
innovative approach to voting. It's been 
used by General Motors, General Electric 
and so forth. Why it has to depend upon 
me that it doesn't work, I don't know. OK, 
thirdly. At the 1980 General Conference, 
a new system was utilized which helped as- 
sure an equal application of the time 
limitation imposed upon individual 
presentations, as well as those making 
committee reports to the conference. The 
timing device proved to be so successful 
that it is once again being utilized at this 
General Conference. The system is before 
you. It is composed of green, yellow and 
red lights which are set for the time limits 
allowed. The green light comes on when 
the speaker has 2 minutes remaining. The 
yellow light is illuminated when 1 minute 
remains to close. When the red light 
comes on, the time is up and the presiding 
officer will rap the gavel. 

For the second time in the long history 
of General Conferences, we are providing 
simultaneous translations by electronic 
means for the elected delegates requiring 
such services. Utilizing wireless equip- 
ment, all plenary sessions and worship 
services are being translated into five lan- 
guages, and broadcast to special receivers 
designed for use by the individual 
delegates. Translations of the proceedings 
are currently in French, German, 
Spanish, Portuguese, and Korean. Any 
delegate requiring translations may check 



out a headset for each session by stopping 
by Room 116. 

For those persons requiring sign lan- 
guage, the section of the hall by Section A 
has been set aside for this purpose. Signers 
will be there to convey the proceedings 
within this area. It is our sincere hope that 
through the use of the image magnifica- 
tion, the new electronic voting system, the 
automatic timing device, wireless inter- 
pretation, and the signers for those with 
hearing impairment, that the efficiency of 
the conference will be enhanced and it will 
be more meaningful to you, the par- 
ticipants. Thank you so much. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you, sir. (ap- 
plause) 

FRANCES ALGUIRE: The Commis- 
sion on the General Conference recom- 
mends that the per diem allowance be set 
at $55 per day for the days that the 
delegate is in attendance at the sessions of 
the conference, April 26 through May 6. 1 
move this recommendation. 

BISHOP HUNT: Is there any question? 
If you will approve this recommendation, 
lift your hand. Opposed? And it is ap- 
proved. 

FRANCES ALGUIRE: At this time, 
may I present Dr. Clifford Droke, general 
secretary and treasurer of the General 
Council on Finance and Administration 
and General Conference treasurer. Please 
listen very carefully as he gives instruc- 
tions and information regarding filing of 
travel expense vouchers and the issuance 
of checks. Dr. Droke... 

BISHOP HUNT: Dr. Droke. 

CLIFFORD DROKE: Clifford Droke. 
Bishop, if I take the word of the General 
Conference secretary, there are some 964 
persons who are interested in this; if I 
depend upon the voting machines, there 
are some 513. However, many of you who 
are present and are interested in having a 
portion of your expenses reimbursed 
might want to pay attention to this 
presentation. The delegates are going to 
receive two expense reimbursement 
checks during the course of the General 
Conference. The first one that you will 
receive this week is for travel; the second 
one, which you will receive next week is 
for the per diem expense, that is, the daUy 
allowance of the $55 for housing and 
meals. As you arrived today and took 
places at your desk, the chairpersons of 
each delegation should have discovered 
waiting an envelope containing travel ex- 
pense vouchers for all members of their 
delegations. It is the chairs of the delega- 



tions who are responsible for distributing 
those expense vouchers to you, receiving 
them back from you, approving them, and 
then submitting them to the General Con- 
ference Treasurer's office, which is in 
Room 272, second floor of this building, 
far south wall. Delegates are asked to care- 
fully read the instructions related to the 
allowable expenses. They're on the 
reverse side of those travel expense 
vouchers. Any questions you have can be 
addressed either to your delegation chair- 
persons; or if additional information or as- 
sistance is needed, to the staff of the 
Treasurer's office in Room 272. That of- 
fice also has available a staff person who 
has the particular responsibility for assist- 
ing delegates to the General Conference 
who come from lands other than the USA. 
We're asking delegates to complete those 
travel expense vouchers as promptly as 
possible, give them back to the chairper- 
son of your delegation so they're ap- 
proved. Chairpersons, collect them all 
together; it will help us in the office; bring 
them to the Treasurer's office. If we can 
have them no later than Wednesday, that 
is, tomorrow, before the evening session 
begins, it will be possible for you to have 
in hand on Friday these travel expense 
checks. Please note that the per diem 
checks that we will be processing next 
week, when we'll distribute vouchers on 
Monday, you'll get them back to us Wed- 
nesday, we'll get you the checks on Friday. 
Those per diem checks will only be for 
the 11 days from the opening to the clos- 
ing of the General Conference, so that if, 
for example, you had to travel in here 
yesterday and you had some meal expen- 
ses, perhaps some housing expenses re- 
lated to that because it was essential for 
travel reasons for you to be here, you are 
to charge those actual expenses up to the 
$55 per day, per diem, limit on the voucher 
that you are handling now and the same 
thing if on the other end of the trip you 
have to stay here or you're traveling and 
you're going to buy some meals, give as ac- 
curate an estimate as you can of what 
those expenses will be and submit that on 
this travel expense voucher. The per diem 
of voucher will be simply eleven days, $55 
a day, $605 a month. The only other thing 
I have. Bishop, are-well two things really- 
-some of you may want to cash personal 
checks while you're here in St. Louis. 
We've made an arrangement for that so 
that there should be no difficulty what- 
soever, if you do a couple things: 1) If you'll 
make the personal check out in any 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 27, 1988 



amount up to $100, make the check pay- 
able to the Mercantile Bank, bring the 
bank...the check by theTreasurer's Office, 
Room 272, have us stamp it, initial it; and 
then you can take it three blocks south, 
that-a-way down 8th Street, to the Mer- 
cantile Bank on the comer of 8th and 
Locust; and they should cash it with no 
problem. If you've got a pen in hand, let 
me give you three references that may be 
helpful: 1) If three days from now you 
want to cash a personal check and you 
can't remember a thing I said because you 
were still intrigued with the marvels of the 
electronic age, you might want to note 
that page 5 contains the instructions, page 
5 of today's DCA contains the instructions 
about personal check cashing and that 
B14 Advance Daily Christian Advocate 
(page 14 in Edition B) contains the rules 
of this conference related to delegates' ex- 
pense. And that concludes this an- 
nouncement, Bishop. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you, sir. 

ALGUIRE: I wish to report that the 
Commission on the General Conference 
has selected Louisville, Kentucky, as the 
site for the 1992 General Conference. The 
dates of the conference will be May 5-15, 
1992. We express thanks to Bishop Paul 
Duffey and the members of the Louisville 
Annual Conference for this invitation. My 
sincere thanks to members of the staff of 
United Methodist Communications for 
their thorough news coverage of General 
Conference. We have greatly appreciated 
Robert Lear's work with the commission 
during this past quadrennium. In closing, 
I wish to share a favorite quote from Mary 
McCloud Bethune, missionary-minded 
educator and founder of Bethune-Cook- 
man College. I quote: "Stand with your feet 
pointing the way to a better world." These 
are your moments now; your vision ex- 
tends; your creative ability is getting into 
action." End quote. These are our mo- 
ments. I pray that God will point our feet 
in the right direction and give us clear 
vision for action today and in eveiy tomor- 
row, (applause 

BISHOP HUNT: We express great ap- 
preciation to these who have labored in 
our behalf so faithfully and who have here 
reported to us. The report of the Commis- 
sion on the General Conference is before 
yoiL If you will approve it as a whole, lift 
your hand. Opposed? And it is approved. I 
turn now to Dr. Frank Nestler to report 
for the Committee on Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order. 



FRANK NESTLER: You have the 
report of our committee in the Advance 
Edition B. I am going to select certain 
items of priority nature because it does not 
appear that we would finish this report in 
time for us to do what comes at 4:30, so let 
me pick out several and take them first. 
And then we will pick the others up later. 
We have some elections to follow. If you 
will turn to B-5, IV, Secretarial Staff. 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes, over here, sir. 
Microphone 5. Well, will you go to another 
microphone; that doesn't seem to be ac- 
tive. Back to 10, please. 

MARK BLAISING (Northern Indiana): 
Bishop Hunt and members of the con- 
ference, I would like to make a motion 
relative to a nomination, but I think in 
order to do that I need a suspension of the 
rules. Is that correct? 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, I think perhaps 
we had better know what the motion is. 

BLAISING: All right. In that I know 
that there are at least three petitions relat- 
ing to the office of the Secretary-designate 
of the General Conference, I would move 
that when the report of the Nominating 
Committee is given on today's agenda that 
the nomination for the position of 
Secretary-designate of the General Con- 
ference be deferred until the petitions 
relating to the Secretary-designate have 
been acted upon by the appropriate legis- 
lative group and the General Conference. 
BISHOP HUNT: Well, it is seconded. 
Now, Dr. Nestler, is this the place? I do not 
know what you were dealing with when 
you announced this portion of the report. 

NESTLER: I was not dealing with that 
particular part. I was dealing... 

BISHOP HUNT: I would have to say 
that that part, that that particular motion 
would not be in order now. It would come 
at the time the nominations are to be 
heard. 

BLAISING: Thank you very much. 

BISHOP HUNT: Please continue. Doc- 
tor. 

NESTLER: IV, on B-5, Secretarial Staff. 
The reason we want this before you is, as 
you can see in the boldface type, we are 
making some changes. Section B: "Other 
persons from the ministry or lay member- 
ship of The United Methodist Church 
shall be selected by the Secretary of the 
General Conference and, after approval by 
the Commission on the General Con- 
ference, shall form the secretarial support 
staff." You can see by the deleted lines 
what essentially we are doing is changing 
it from an election by this group to a selec- 



tion by the Secretary of the General Con- 
ference after approval by the Commission 
on the General Conference. It does not 
seem appropriate that some of the work is 
done before they ever get here. The 
Secretary needs this staff, has the staff 
working, and then to come to the site of 
the General Conference and have them 
elected after they have been working for a 
period of time. It has been perfunctory to 
elect, so the recommendation here is 
simply that they be selected by the 
Secretary of the General Conference, but 
that there be accountability after approval 
by the Commission on the General Con- 
ference. So I'll move that Section B be 
changed as is worded here in the report. 

BISHOP HUNT: It is before you. If you 
will approve this motion, lift your hand. 
Opposed? And it is approved. 

NESTLER: Section D under secretarial 
staff is a really sort of putting into the ac- 
count what has been done after ascertain- 
ing that petitions, resolutions, and regular 
communications in hand and dealing with 
the regular business of the conference 
meet the requirements therein specified 
in the Discipline Par. 608. The secretary 
shall prepare the same for reference to the 
appropriate standing administrative, or 
legislative committee subject to review by 
the Committee on Reference. This is keep- 
ing with procedure, but we wanted it espe- 
cially stated here so it would be under the 
duties of the secretarial staff. I move its 
adoption. 

BISHOP HUNT: Ifyou will approve this 
motion, lift your hand. Opposed? And it is 
approved. 

NESTLER: Section E has to do with the 
tellers. If you will turn to B-9, the right- 
hand column towards the bottom, you'll 
see "9 tellers" that's been stricken there. 
What we have done is essentially move 
that over as the responsibility of the 
secretary and grouped it here, rather than 
putting it under the committees; for it's 
not actually a committee in the sense that 
the others are committees. It's not 
the.. .the only change is that if a person 
who is appointed as a teller is elected as an 
officer of a standing committee, he or she 
shall cease serving as a teller and a replace- 
ment teller shall be appointed by the 
secretary. The names of the tellers shall be 
printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. I 
move the adoption of each. 

BISHOP HUNT: Ifyou wiU approve this 
motion, lift a hand. Opposed? And it is ap- 
proved. 



AprU 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



NESTLER: In Section F, the only 
change there is that instead of making the 
work of the secretary being supervised by 
the entire Commission on the General 
Conference, we thought there would be 
times when the Executive Committee 
would have to act on behalf of the commis- 
sion and so we specifically worded that the 
work of the secretary shall be supervised 
by the Executive Committee of the Com- 
mission on the General Conference, and I 
move that change. 

BISHOP HUNT: If you will approve this 
motion, lift your hand. Opposed? And it is 
approved. 

NESTLER: Now I want to move to B- 10, 
Section C, Standing Legislatives Commit- 
tees. Let me first of all say that the 1984 
General Conference gave the Plan and Or- 
ganization Committee the authority.. .the 
interim authority to determine the num- 
ber and responsibilities of the standing 
legislative committees for the General 
Conference. And so this Section C is a 
report that we have come up with to meet 
that requirement. There is one correction 
I need to make. If you will note, under 6, 
General Administration, we have listed 
para. 747, but if you will look under Com- 
mittee 2, Conferences, we also have para. 
747 listed. It should probably belong with 
the Conferences and should be stricken 
from General Administration. This error 
was an oversight when we brought every- 
thing together and did not clear then. We 
have one other action that is of a little dif- 
ferent nature. Following the setup of these 
committees, the sending of the forms to 
the appropriate secretaries of the annual 
conferences listing the standing legisla- 
tive committees and their responsibilities, 
it was brought to our attention that there 
needed to be correlation between 
paragraphs 2620 and 2626, which you will 
find under Committee 9, Independent 
Commissions and Judicial Administra- 
tion, with certain paragraphs that are to 
be found in Number 11, Ordained and 
Diaconal Ministry. Our first response to 
that was that since we had already sent out 
the forms that it would remain as is. In fur- 
ther dialogue and discussion brought the 
conmiittee to the opinion that there is a 
legitimate concern so that there is consis- 
tency of language and consistency of ap- 
proach with the paragraphs— 450 
paragraphs primarily, I believe-in the Or- 
dained and Diaconal Ministry with this ac- 
tion of investigation trials and appeals. 

NESTLER: We were not exactly sure 
what authority we had, and when those 



committees became the authority.. .be- 
came the possession of the General Con- 
ference. But we are announcing, subject to 
your approval, that Paragraphs 2620 and 
2626 will be transferred from Committee 
No. 9, Independent Commissions and 
Judicial Administration, to Committee 
No. 11, Ordained and Diaconal Ministry. 

BISHOP HUNT: If there is no objec- 
tion, I guess that will stand. That's an an- 
nouncement subject to... Yes? Is this a 
comment on this particular point? Come 
to microphone 7. 

VERNON BIGLER (Western New 
York): Vernon Bigler, Western New York. 
It seems to me, sir, that this matter of 2620 
and 2000 paragraphs should be sent to the 
Committee on Judicial Matters. I am 
wondering at this point if the chair of this 
committee who is reporting would see any 
wisdom in establishing a joint conversa- 
tion committee between these two legisla- 
tive groups so that we could work at it in 
that manner. Would you comment on 
that, sir? 

NESTLER: Yes. One of the criticisms 
that came to us was that four years ago 
these two worked in opposite directions 
and there was not that kind of com- 
munication, and therefore they felt that 
they should be brought together and dealt 
with by the same committee. I am not in 
a position to... 

BIGLER: Would it be appropriate, Mr. 
Chair, for me to move that the assign- 
ments be left as they are with the option 
of these two committees to consult on 
them? If so, I would like to so move. 

BISHOP HUNT: Be left as it is under 
No. 9? 

BIGLER: Yes, sir. 

BISHOP HUNT: This is... 

NESTLER: I think there are some judi- 
cial matters that are very significant there 
that need to be looked from at a point of 
view other than the Board of Ministry. 

BISHOP HUNT: Are you ready to move 
the adoption of this now.. .portion of the 
report now? 

NESTLER: Well, I was ready. If they 
want to do this... 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, I think it would 
be proper to make the motion and then let 
him amend it. 

NESTLER: I '11 move the adoption of the 
legislative committees as printed with the 
correction and the action on 2620, 2626. 

BISHOP HUNT: Now do you wish to 
make the amendment now. Dr. Bigler? 



BIGLER: This has caught me by 
surprise, but I'll try. I move that.. .We have 
not voted on this motion yet, have we? 

BISHOP HUNT: No. 

BIGLER: So I would move to amend 
that these matters of paragraphs 2000 and 
2600 be left in Committee No. 9 and that 
that committee be requested to consult 
with the Committee on Ministry concern- 
ing these matters. 

BISHOP HUNT: Is it seconded? It is 
seconded. Do you wish to speak further on 
it? 

BIGLER: No, sir. I think I have made 
my statement. Thank you. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right. Does anyone 
wish to speak against this motion to 
amend? All right? Yes. On the left? 
Anyone who wishes to speak on this mo- 
tion to amend? All right. If you are in favor 
of the amendment, lift your hand. Op- 
posed? If you are in favor of the amend- 
ment, will you stand? Thank you. If you're 
opposed, wOl you stand? As the chair sees 
it, the motion to amend is approved. 

NESTLER: Mr. Chairman, may I just 
call attention that all changes proposed in 
this report must be approved by a two- 
thirds vote? 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes, and that would 
include the amendment, thank you. It is 
not approved by a two-thirds vote, I would 
say. No, it did not prevail; it did not have 
the two-thirds vote necessary. Thank yoa 
All right, microphone 3. 

BOYD MATHER (IOWA): Boyd Math- 
er, Iowa Conference. 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes. 

BOYD MATHER: Question about 
whether an amendment to this would 
have to have the two-thirds. I understand 
that the report must have it, but cannot be 
amended by simple majority. 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, my colleagues 
tell me that they think it can be amended 
by a simple majority, because the final 
vote will determine the two-thirds matter. 
So... I would say what I said first, that the 
amendment does prevail. You may go 
ahead. Doctor. 

BOYD MATHER: I'm not arguing for or 
against the motion, that's why we brought 
it here, because we were quite certain, but 
let me read Rule 38: "The Plan of Or- 
ganization of these Rules of Order may be 
amended or changed by a two-thirds vote 
of the Conference; provided the proposed 
change or amendment has originated in 
the Committee on the Plan Organization- 
Rules of Order, or has been presented to 
the Conference in writing and referred to 



90 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



this committee, which committee shall 
report thereon, not later than the follow- 
ing day." 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, I guess Rule 37 
would indicate that it would have to be an 
amendment. Just a moment, please, while 
we're trying to make this decision. Rule 37 
apparently applies here, and a motion to 
amend would have to have a two-thirds 
majority, which this motion did not. 
Therefore, the motion did not prevail. No, 
yes, I'll hear your point, of course. 
Microphone 12. What is your point? 

LEONARD SLUTZ (West Ohio): Mr. 
Chairman, Leonard Slutz, West Ohio. 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes, Leonard Slutz, 
West Ohio. 

SLUTZ: My point of order is that Vem 
Bigler was not changing the rules. It was 
the recommendation by Dr. Nestler that 
we change the rules. The rules as printed 
had these particular paragraphs in Com- 
mittee 9, and Brother Nestler wanted to 
change it, but he didn't change it by a two- 
thirds vote; it wasn't changed. Instead, 
Vern Bigler, with his amendment, 
prevailed. 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, this...the chair 
feels that the suggestion made by Dr. 
Nestler did constitute a proposed change. 
SLUTZ: But his motion was not carried by 
a two-thirds vote, which we needed. In 
fact, his motion did not even carry. 

BISHOP HUNT: It has not been put. 

SLUTZ: No, so it has not yet been 
changed. Therefore, Dr. Bigler's motion 
was very much in order, and it passed by 
a very substantial majority. We have not 
yet amended the riiles as printed. 

BISHOP HUNT: That's correct. 

SLUTZ: Therefore, Dr. Bigler's motion 
was in order. 

BISHOP HUNT: That's correct, and I 
would have to say that your point is well 
taken because Rule 37 applies to the 
amendment of the rules, and the rules 
have not yet been amended. All right. Dr. 
Bigler's motion does prevail. All right. 
And you thought electronic gadgets were 
the only fun we were going to have! All 
right. 

NESTLER: I just reported as the com- 
mittee wanted it reported. 

BISHOP HUNT: WeU, there's someone 
over here; just a moment. Yes? 
Microphone 

THOMAS MOORE (East Ohio): 
Bishop, I am assuming the motion is still 
before us as amended and I wish to place 
another amendment, sir. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right. 



MOORE: I rise in recognition of the lay 
people because trials involve lay people as 
well as elders and diaconal ministers. And 
you are wishing to have consultation with 
a board that involves diaconal ministers 
and elders. And I say that if you wish to 
begin consultation, you should refer also 
to a committee which involves lay people. 
And I assume then that that should be the 
Committee on Discipleship, where Lay 
Life and Work is housed. And hence I 
move that we involve also consultation 
with the Committee on Discipleship, for 
the reason that I have expressed Lay 
people are involved here, also. 

HUNT: All right, is it seconded? All 
right, are you ready to vote on this? 

If you will approve this amendment, lift 
your hand. Opposed? And it does not 
receive approval. Now, Doctor. 

NESTLER: Let's turn then to the stand- 
ing administrative committees, IV on B-7. 
I will go through these and only call atten- 
tion where you feel it is... 

HUNT: Now we have not voted yet on 
your motion. Are you ready to vote on the 
chair's motion? If you... yes, microphone 4. 

VICTOR GOLDSCHMIDT (North In- 
diana): Goldschmidt, North Indiana. 

BISHOP HUNT: Goldschmidt, North 
Indiana. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: This may be the 
wrong time. I want to be sure we can do it, 
so let me try this amendment to Frank's 
motion, which I believe is before us. 

BISHOP HUNT: His motion is before 
you. 

(X)LDSCHMIDT: The motion will be 
amended to include the following: 'When 
a report to a legislative committee in- 
cludes in its recommendations discipli- 
nary changes, then such changes, if 
presently assigned to another legislative 
committee, shall be reassigned to the same 
committee where the report is being 
presented" If there's a second, I'll try to 
explain it. 

BISHOP HUNT: It's seconded 

GOLDSCHMIDT: I hereby try to ex- 
plain it. As two examples. Legislative 
CJommittee No. 6 is receiving a report from 
the connection, which propose changes to 
the Discipline. Article 111. That change in 
the Discipline. Ill, however, has been as- 
signed to the Local Church Legislative 
Committee. Another example: the report 
on stewardship is also presented to Legis- 
lative Committee No. 6, the recommended 
disciplinary changes 1215 are assigned to 
Discipleship. I think we're headed for 
chaos if we don't try to amend this. 



NESTLER: May I respond as best I can 
to that, Bishop? 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, let's see first if 
we have any speech on the floor. There is 
an amendment before you. You have 
heard its explanation. Does someone wish 
to oppose it? (no response) Then I will 
recognize you, sir, to respond. 

NESTLER: We recognize it is not pos- 
sible to always, uh, put the paragraphs in 
the appropriate committee to the sense 
that it will exclude everything else. The 
difference between what I was proposing a 
moment ago and now what's available 
once we've come to the site of the con- 
ference: the Plan of Organization felt that 
they were making a decision prior to com- 
ing to the scene of the conference. The 
only question was whether this report was 
in your hands at the time that the original 
forms were sent out to the secretaries. We 
made this decision along in January or 
February to do this and report in this man- 
ner, but because we were a little unsure of 
who had possession of it, we left it to the 
decision of this group. We now have a 
Ckjmmittee on Reference in place, and if a 
committee feels that they are dealing with 
a subject that some other committee also 
has, they can request to have that referred 
to their committee or they can refer theirs 
to the other committee, so there is a 
process once we're here to take care of 
those things that arise. I don't know of any 
way we can make it 100 per cent effective 
simply because sometimes it's subject 
matter, and subject matters do go to two 
or three committees. We've done the best 
we can by trying to make these paragraphs 
fit according to the Discipline, but there is 
a Reference Committee, which now has 
the means of the communication between 
the legislative committees to accomplish 
what you're talking about, Victor, I think, 
here on the site of the conference. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right. Thank you. 
Are you ready to vote on this amendment? 

Yes? Microphone 4. 

REX BEVINS (Nebraska): Rex Bevins, 
Nebraska. I request that the motion be 
read, the Goldschmidt motion. 

BISHOP HUNT: Does the secretarial 
staff have it? Would you read it, please? 

FAITH RICHARDSON: When a report 
to a legislative committee includes in its 
recommendations disciplinary changes, 
then such changes, if properly assigned ... 
oh boy, you can't read this...uh, if proper- 
ly assigned to another legislative commit- 
tee, shall be assigned to the same 
committee in making the report when the 



April 27, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



91 



report is being presented. It is very dif- 
ficult to read this. 

BISHOP HUNT: AU right, I'll let the 
maker of the motion restate it, only that, 
please. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: I apologize. 

BISHOP HUNT: Microphone 4. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: You should see what 
my students say when I write on the over- 
head projector. I'll try again. I apologize. 
Faith. (Goldschmidt rereads amend- 
ment.) I might add, it's only the changes 
which are being referred to. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, thank you. 
Are you ready now? If you will approve this 
amendment, lift your hand. Opposed? 
And it is not approved. All right, are you 
ready now to vote on this motion that the 
chair of the committee has made for this 
portion of the report? If you will approve 
it as you have amended it, lift your hand. 
Opposed? And it is approved. All right, 
let's turn to... 

NESTLER: Bishop, I see there is only 
about ten minutes left. Do you have other 
items... 

BISHOP HUNT: Well, we have many 
other items.. .yes.. .we... I wish to call the 
house's attention respectfully to the fact 
that we must organize the legislative com- 
mittees this afternoon and I'm sure that 
we will accommodate our discussions to be 
helpful there. 

NESTLER: We can postpone, I think, 
the rest of this 'til tomorrow if it will help 
the process because we've done the things 
that need to be done so they can organize 
the legislative committees. 

BISHOP HUNT: Very well, I think it 
would be helpful. Thank you sir. Now the 
Committee on Credentials, Mr. Oden who 
is reporting for that committee... well then 
I'll call for the committee for the.. .for 
nominations. Dr. Richardson, Secretary. 

RICHARDSON: Bishop Hunt and 
delegates, I present in nomination the 
name of Merle W. Drennon as Coor- 
dinator of Calendar. 

BISHOP HUNT: Are you ready? If you 
will approve this nomination lift your 
hand. Opposed? And it is approved. Thank 
you. Are there nominations from the 
secretary of the Council of Bishops? 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Mr. Chairman, we 
place in nomination the following persons 
to serve on the committee on Plan of Or- 
ganization and Rules of Order for the next 
quadrennium: Bruce P. Blake, Jeriy G. 
Bray, Jr., Jonah Chang, Anita Fenster- 
macher, Charlene Helton, Eldon B. 
Mahon, Nathanael Manuel, William A. 



McCartney, Charles A. Sayre, Connie J. 
Takamine. 

BISHOP HUNT: Are there any ques- 
tions or other nominations? If you will ap- 
prove these, lift your hand. Opposed? And 
they are approved. 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Mr. Chairman, we 
are prepared to present in nomination a 
name for the office of Secretary Designate 
of the General Conference. I think there 
was a motion earlier. 

BISHOP HUNT: Yes, and I recognize 
you Sir, Microphone Number 5. 

MARCUS BLAISING: Bishop Hunt, 
members of the conference, I would like to 
make a motion relative to the office of the 
Secretary Designate of the General Con- 
ference. Therefore, I move that when this 
report of the nominating committee is 
given on today's agenda that the nomina- 
tion for the position of Secretary Desig- 
nate of the General Conference be 
deferred until the petitions relating to the 
Secretary Designate have been acted upon 
by the appropriate legislative group and by 
the General Conference. 

BISHOP HUNT: Alright, now, we know 
what your motion is and, as you indicated 
earlier, our ability to entertain it, will 
depend upon a suspension of the rules. 
The rule applicable in this plan of or- 
ganization is on B-5 of the Advance Addi- 
tion of the DCA and under rule Number 
37, as has already been cited, the suspen- 
sion of any portion of the Plan of Or- 
ganization or of these Rules of Order 
requires a two-thirds vote by the body. 
The item for the nomination.. .the item of 
the nomination of a Secretary Designate 
is scheduled for this opening session of 
General Conference. Is there a motion 
that we suspend the rules at this point in 
order to entertain the motion that has 
been suggested? All right. Yes, this is 
a.. .we.. .we have a motion to suspend the 
rules. Is this a point of order? 

FAY CLEVELAND: Point of informa- 
tion. 

BISHOP HUNT: Microphone 7. 

CLEVELAND: Fay Cleveland, Western 
New York Conference. 

BISHOP HUNT: Cleveland, Western 
New York. 

CLEVELAND: Sir, I am wondering, 
have we adopted the rules of order? These 
rules are from the 1984 Session and they 
obtain until the 1988 rules have been 
adopted. 

BISHOP HUNT: Are you ready? If you 
will suspend this rule on B-5 Section B, the 
election of the Secretary Designate, lift 



your hand. Opposed? And it does not 
receive the required two-thirds majority. 
You may proceed. 

CLEVELAND: Mr. Chairman, we are 
prepared to place in nomination the name 
of Dr. C. Faith Richardson for the office of 
Secretary Designate for the coming quad- 
rennium. 

BISHOP HUNT: All right, yes, I see. Is 
there another nomination? Microphone 8. 

STEVEN MOTT (Southern New 
England): I move the nominations be 



BISHOP DUFFEY: Is it seconded? The 
chair saw no one else trying to get the floor 
at the time this delegate requested it and 
the motion is to close nominations. It's 
seconded. All right. Is this a point of 
order? 

MOTT: Yes, it's a point of order. 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Microphone 3. 

SAM PHILLIPS (South Indiana): I 
guess it's a question of information first, 
rather than a point of order. On the action 
that we took, the motion, as I understood 
it, was to delay the nominations until... 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Now that has been 
determined, that motion could not be 
entertained because we did not suspend 
the rules. 

SAM PHILUPS: Was the two-thirds re- 
quirement necessary on that particular 
motion? 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Yes, sir, it was. Now, 
we are under the motion to close nomina- 
tions. If you will approve it, lift your hand. 
I beg your pardon, I did not see someone 
over there. All right, I'll suspend the 
voting long enough to hear what this is. 
This is an important matter. Microphone 
10. 

FRANK FURMAN (Florida): Bishop, 
Frank Furman, Lay, Florida. 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Frank Furman, 
Florida. 

FRANK FURMAN: Sir, we at this table 
heard a nomination, and then we heard an 
immediate motion to dose nominations. 
This is too much like a railroad, sir. If 
there are other nominations, I think time 
should be allowed for them. 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Now, let the chair 
respond to that. The chair asked if there 
were other nominations. The gentleman, 
the delegate, received the floor and made 
the motion to dose nominations. Now, if 
we have other nominations or if you wish 
to be sure that this privilege is honored, 
you will simply vote against this motion to 
dose nominations. Is that dear? If you are 
in favor of the motion to close nomina- 



i)2 



DAILY CI litis ri AN ADVOCATE 



April 27, 1988 



tloiiN, lift your hiind. OpponoilV And llu- 
inotiDi) (iiMi* not pri<vnil. Arv there other 
noininiilloii.tV Yiv, I mv Nomet>ne here iit 
mirn)phoiie f). 

SAM PIIILI.irS NhiniiiK nround the 
rDiircreiu'e, Soul I) liidiiinn Cont'ereiu'e: I'd 
like lo phii-e in noniiniition the iiiune of 
Caiolvii Miiihhnll. 

HISHOI" DUKKKY: The iiitnie ..I 
fiu'olyn MiunIwiII l.spliu-ed in noniiniilion. 
Aiv tliere olher niiniiniilion.s? The chtiir 
KiVH no one else .stvkinK I he floor. There 
nre now two noniinntionit for the ofTlix< ul' 
S«Hietiir>' deNiKniile. We do not eltvt 
today. The time for the elivtion is 
seheduU'd duMiiK tluw Netwions hy the 
nttiMtdn ii>niniitt«>f and the noniinnlion.s 
now «n< elo.sed and tlie elivtion will be be- 
tween tl>e two noniiniH'.s. Thiink you very 
much. Now then, the ivport of the Com 
nutttvon A^endn Brother Hivnn. 

JOHN lUVAN: Bishop lUint, 1 have an 
agenda whii'l) the A^jenda Commit tiH> thitt 
morninH pivpartM for tomorrow. In the 
meantime, this arterniH»n ha.s happened. I 
don't know if I have the nutliority to net a 
quick polling of the ctimmiltiv, Or. 
Ne.stler tells me tlu-y will nivd about thir- 
ty minutes, he thmks, tomorrow, which 
\vi> had not biult into tonuirrow's agenda. 
I think I have a sense of the auumitttv, 
und they would not objivt to our addiuK 
thai in, but I don't know if that is permi.s- 
sihle. 

BISHOP Ml'NT: Well, if you want to 
take that authority as the rhnir... 

BIVAN: I'll lake it and imvt with the 
i-omnuttiv tomorn>w tf they don'l like it. 
0\\ that basis then we have an nxemln for 
tonuuniw, Oo you want nu" to detail it at 
this n>adn\|;'.' 

BISHOP HUNT; I think it would be 
helpt\il, sir. 

BIVAN : At 9:(H)-l):30 wp wUl have the in • 
trx>duction of the laity-addn'ss maker and 
the laity addn«ss. J);;U)-rt:;ir> we will have a 
prt^sentation by The UnittM Methodist 
Publishinn House. 1):;1.'>-S).40 we will have 
a matter i^imvrninn the trustit»s of theold 



J<din StriH'l United Melhodiat Church. 
lt:4() !>;45 we will have eUvtion of Inter- 
juristliclional Commit t«v on Kpiacopacy. 
Herecommittiv I am inaertinK. H:45-l():ir) 
wo will return to, and we trust, complete 
the report of the ('ommillw on Flan of Or- 
gnni/alion and Kules of Order. 10:15- 
H):1H we will have the report for the 
anentla for Thursday. U);1H we trust we 
will ai^ourn to legislative H(>Nsions. 

BISI lOP HUNT; Thankyou very much. 
Now are there.. .yi>«, I se«' 
you...micropht)ne 7. 

BOB WATKILS (Texas): Bob Waters, 
Texas Conf«'reiuv. 

BISHOP HUNT: Bob Waters, Texas 
Conference. 

BOB WATERS: Bishop, 1 do not wish to 
olTer the ri-solution if it would be more ap- 
pn)priate, in view of his comment about 
additional agenda items tomorrow. I do 
not want to have the matter delayed day 
after day and never be able to amend the 
aj^Mida report. Is it proper that 1 oITer an 
amendment to the report of the ARenda 
Committtv at this time'.' 

BISHOP HUN T: The report is not ac- 
tually before the body. It would be better 
for you to hold that amendment until 
tomorrow. 

WATKI^: Thank you. sir. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you. Now then, 
the announcements that are neces.sary at 
thistime. There is one which thechair will 
midte. and then a moment of high 
priviU>jje as we close t he aHernoon session. 
Dr. Richard.son, are there an- 
nounivment.s'.' 

FAITH RICHARDSON; 1 have none, 
sir. 

BISHOP HUNT: The deloRntw.and 
this ia the important matter to which I al- 
luded. The dele(jati>s an> to go immediate- 
ly for the orRnnijation of the Uvislative 
commit tix^s, that is for the nuvting of the 
liVi.slative committees, and are to follow 
the riMim numbers as they are detailed on 
pajje 2 1 of the DCA, which is on your desk 
today. This is the correct list of room as- 



signments. Yes, I sw a delegate. 
Microphiuu*... 

C.INNY CORDON (Central Illinois); 1 
was wondering if we might leave materials 
on the ditik or whether we need to tidte 
i-verything with us. 

BJSI lOP HUNT; Is there advice on this 
from the sivretary or. Dr. Woodring, are 
you here'.' All right, I do not know how to 
respond to that. Yi-s. there's Ms. Alguire, 
microphone 4. 

FliANCKS ALGUIRE; It's perfectly 
Hne lo U-aveyour working materials; jusl 
do not leave valuables in here. 

BISHOP HUNT: Thank you. that 
answers our question. Now then, we hope 
the working materials are valuable, but wc 
know what Ms. Alguire meant. All right, I 
would like to call upon a very distin- 
gxiished and greatly beloved leader of our 
church to offer the benediction for thus 
id\ernoon's session. There are many ways 
in which I could present him. I do not need 
to introduce him. He has been a bishop of 
our church for 40 years. This is his 18th 
General Conference. He was world editor 
of the Upper Room before being elected to 
the epi.sin>pacy. He has left the trail of 
bU>ssing across the world church. He 
servtHi for a long time ils the Secretary of 
the Council of Bishops. He is. to many of 
u.s, a kind of father in God and has meant 
more to me personally than I know how to 
say. Will you stand and receive the 
benediction fh)m Bishop Roy H. Short. 



Tuesday Evening 
April 26, 1988 

Hymnal Sing, led by Dr. Carlton R. 
Young 

Prayer, led by Bishop Nolan B. Harmon 

Episcopal Address. Bishop Jack M. 
Tuell - sw page 78 

A report of the Committee on Presiding 
OfTtcers was made by James M. Walker. 

Bishop Arthur Kulah will preside at the 
Wedni«sday morning plenary- session. 






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DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



ROUNDUPEOITO 



1988 GENERAL CONFERENCE 



A TIMELY 
SUMMARY OF 
GENERAL 
CONFERENCE 
ACTIONS 



SMILE 

UNITED METHODISTS 

you are on camera and in the 
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Daily Report 

Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Voi.vn 



St. Louis, Missouri, Thursday, April 28, 1988 



No. 3 



Homosexual legislation set for Monday 

Conference's first full day also includes Laity Address, Arch Event 

Two issues due to receive major atten- 
tion during the 1988 United Methodist 
General Conference made their first ap- 
pearance Wednesday. After about 30 
minutes of discussion and motions, the 
996 delegates set a special order of the 
day for 10:30 a.m. Monday to deal with 
all legislation pertaining to 
homosexuality. A bid for a 90-minute 
time limit on debate failed. Introducing 
the motion, the Rev. Bob E. Waters, 
Beaumont, Texas, said his Texas Con- 
ference delegation believes that most 
participants "came predisposed in mind" 
as to how they will vote on the questions. 
The 90-minute limit, he said, would 
prevent "dissipat(ion) of energies that 
need to be sjpent in many other crucial 
concerns. "ITiere are three principal 
places where changes in the Book of Dis- 
cipline are proposed, and dozens of peti- 
tions relating to one or another aspect of 
the issue. 




John Goodwin 



Agenda 

Thursday, April 28 

9:00 a.m. Report of Council of 
Bishops Mission Consulta- 
tion 

9:30 a.m. Courtesies 

9:35 a.m. Agenda for Friday 
Announcements 
Presiding Bishop Commit- 
tee Report 

Adjournment to Legislative 
Sessions 

12:30 p.m. Lunch 

2:30-5:00 p.m. Legislative Com- 
mittees 

7:30 p.m. Legislative Commit- 



At noon, an estimated 200 United 
Methodists met at the Gateway Arch to 
"covenant together, united to work 
together for an agriculture that is just, 
participatory and sustainable." The rally 
was sponsored by the United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, a caucus within the 
church dedicated to furthering rural in- 
terests. A major statement on agriculture 
and the riiral crisis in the nation has 
been introduced by the boards of Church 
and Society and Global Ministries.The 
996 voting delegates from the United 
States, Africa, Europe and the Philip- 
pines began the conference's second day 
by listening to, and then applauding en- 
thusiastically, the Laity Address given by 
Joan G. Nagle, an engineer from Munys- 
ville. Pa. "As followers of Christ," she 
said, "we are called to faith, trust, adven- 
ture in the service of our Lord, who ad- 
mitted that he sends us forth as lambs 
among wolves." Discipleship, she as- 
serted, "may mean doing for love what 
we would never dream of doing for 
money." (Text of Laity Address is on 
page 110). 

Bishop James Mase Ault, Pittsburgh, 
preached Wednesday at the fu^t of the 
daily morning worship hours. The Rev. 
Zan Holmes, Dallas, was the speaker at 



the fu^t of eight afternoon services for 
visitors. 

Space in the comers of the conference 
was hard to find Wednesday afternoon 
as the 11 legislative committees broke 
into sub-units to sift the more than 2,000 
petitions from individual United 
Methodists and groups, and resolutions 
and Book of Discipline changes proposed 
by denominational agencies. In most 
cases, the sub-committee members pick- 
ed up their chairs and moved to the edges 
of the Cervantes Center's numerous 
meeting rooms. 

Some delegates and visitors found time 
Wednesday to visit the extensive Cokes- 
bury store. Note pads, tote bags and 
commemorative copies of the present 
hymnal were the early best sellers, clerks 
said, with the facsimile copy of "John 
Wesley's First Hymn Book" coming up 
fast. 

Conference participants in four St. 
Louis hotels-Sheraton, Radisson, Day's 
Inn and Holiday Inn-had an oportunity 
to begin their day with the 6:30 a.m. spe- 
cial 30-minute edition of the 
denomination's "Catch the Spirit" 
television program. The specials will be 
shown each day on the hotels' dosed cir- 
cuit systems. 
-Robert Lew 



98 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 




I -1« 



Sing out! 

The choir (top) which provided leader- 
ship for the Tuesday evening worship 
service was made up of singers from 
United Methodist churches in the Mis- 
souri East Conference and the Southern 
Illinois Conference. Leading the group 
was Carlton R. Young (center), editor of 
the proposed new Book of Hymns, and 
Bernice Marner (lower right), music 
coordinator for the local St. Louis com- 
mittee. She is Missouri East UMW presi- 
dent and a member of Green Trails UMC 
in West St. Louis County. Also serving as 
a song leader was Willetta Atkinson 
(lower left), assistant director for con- 
gregational singing for the General Con- 
ference and choir director at Union 
Memorial UMC in St. Louis 




(PHOTOS BY JOHN GOODWIN AND DONNA KAY CAMPBELL) 



^^^L Co Daily Christian Advocate 




LOVi\ 



Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference of 
the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 
published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist Publishing 
House, P.O. Box 801, Nashville, TN 
.37202. 



Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
Display in Civic Center Elxhibition Hall. 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Bette Prestwood Associate Editor 

Sheila W. McGee Managing Editor 

AndrcwMiller Business Manager 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Meredith Danaher Calendar & Proceedings Editor 

Richard Street Composition Manager 

News & Features 

Mike Cunningham Composition Manager 

Calendar & Proceedings 

Barbara J. WynD Assistant Composition Manager 

James Steele News/Roundup Manager 

KathyKruger Assistant Newa Editor 

Crys Zinkiewici Chief Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg Assistant Copy Editor 

Cindy Sotomon Assistant Copy Editor 

lyouise McEowen Assistant Copy Editor 

Jane M. Schwarz Assistant Copy Editor 

Vivian Mitchell Secretarial Pool Manager 

Angela R. Butler Secretary 

Mochell Anderson Secretary 



Bradford L. Motta Feature Editor 

Glenn Hinton Index Editor 

ThelmaBoeder Assistant Index Editor 

John Goodwin Photographer 

JuanitaBellenfant Sales Manager 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Joyce Wolf Circulation Manager 

Robert K. Feaster 



Subscriptions: Daily Reports (binder included) 
$34.50 if picked up at the DCA booth (final issues 
mailed 1st class); $57.50 mailed daily from St Louis 
by 1st class mail; $46.00 mailed after General Con- 
ference. Individual copies $3.00 each at DCA booth. 
Roundup EUlitlon (one copy included in Daily 
Reports subscription), ten or more to one address, 
$1 each; Single copies, $2 each. Seta mailed after 
Conference: Advance Editions Workbook, $17.50; 
Bound Volumes: Advance Editions Workbook and 
Daily Reports, $126 a set (mailed in August). 



April 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



99 




jary Vincent, vice president of Cokesbury, and Robert Feaster, president and publisher of The 
United Methodist Publishing House preview the display of Charlestown Hymnals in the Cokes- 
bury Bookstore. 

Feaster Presents Gift to Delegates 



Delegates to General Conference were 
presented with beautiful reproductions 
of John Wesley's First Hymn Book, Col- 
lection of Psalms and Hymns. Robert 
Feaster, president and publisher of The 
United Methodist Publishing House, 
made the presentation on Tuesday 
morning. The facsimile copy celebrates 
the 250th anniversary of the first edi- 
tion. The hymn book has become known 
as the "Charleston hymnal". When John 
Wesley arrived in Charles-Town (now 
known as Charleston), South Carolina, 
on April 14, 1737, one of his first tasks 
was to print a collection of English 
psalms, hymns, and German hymns in 



translation for use in Anglican worship. 
Proofsheets were ready four days later 
and the Collection of Psalms and Hymns 
was being used by Wesley in Savannah, 
Georgia, a few months later. There are 
only two copies of the original hymn 
book in existence today, one in The New 
York Public Library and the other in 
London's Methodist Archives. Extensive 
research was done and photographs of 
the original were taken to prepare the 
impressive facsimile copies. Gary Vin- 
cent, vice president of Cokesbury, 
reports that copies of the hymnal are 
available at the Cokesbury bookstore 
($5.95 per copy). 



Cokesbury Introduces New System 



Those people making Cokesbury 
purchases at General Conference are 
enjoying the speed of the new 
"ROSY" system (Retail Operation 
System). Here, Louis Jordan (left), 
Cokesbuiy's director of Operations 
and System Development, uses 
"ROSY" to ring up a sale to E.T. Hol- 
land of Basking Ridge, N.J. Now 
used in nine Cokesbury stores, the 
system automatically finds the 
customer's account number, tax ex- 
empt status and other pertinent in- 
formation. It also eliminates errors 
and keeps a continuous stock inven- 
tory. Cokesbury is using, for the first 
time, a computer bar code pricing 
system which records each item's 
price and stock number electronical- 
ly, supplying customers with detailed 
receipts. 

(Jamet SUtl Photo) 




Catch the Spirit in 
Hotels 

"Catch the Spirit" crews are covering 
the General Conference. Their reports 
will be available both to United 
Methodists in St. Louis and throughout 
the Western Hemisphere. Daily 15- 
minute reports are available by 
television to person staying at four 
hotels near the convention center. At 
the Sheraton St. Louis, Holiday Inn 
Riverfront and the Radisson, the sum- 
maries may be viewed on channel 8. At 
Days Inn at the Arch, they will be carried 
on channel 12. The programs will be 
repeated four times between 6:30 a.m. 
and 7:30 a.m. today through Saturday 
and Monday through Friday next week. 
The daily 15-minute report will be 
uplinked on the Cokesbury Satellite 
Television Network (CSTN) from 1 to 
1:15 p.m. (CDT). A 30-minute "Catch 
the Spirit" wrap-up of General Con- 
ference will be uplinked on Saturday, 
May 7, beginning at 12:45 p.m. The 
regular 30-minute weekly broadcasts of 
"Catch the Spirit" for the weeks of May 
1 and 8 will cover the General Con- 
ference. Bill Dale of United Methodist 
Communications (UMCom) is produc- 
ing the daily 15-minute updates. Kath- 
leen LeCamera, "Catch the Spirit" media 
critic, will produce the 30-minute 
program. 



Local Stations 
Feature UMs 

More than 20 United Methodists will 
be interviewed during General Con- 
ference for programs on St. Louis radio 
and television stations. Last Sunday 
morning Dr. Roslyn K Sykes, Missouri 
East delegate, and the Rev. Harry Smith, 
executive director of Metro Ministry of 
St. Louis, discussed "Homelessness and 
Fair Housing in the St. Louis Area" with 
KMJK-FM radio news director Kevin 
Woodson. On Wednesday, Bishop 
Woodie W. White was interviewed about 
AIDS for "East Side, West Side," a 
production of KDNL-TV. The program- 
will air on Channel 30 at 6:30 a.m., 
Saturday, April 30, and at 6 a.m., Sim- 
day, May 1. Bishops White and Leontine 
T.C. Kelly and Peggy Garrett, a North 
Indiana delegate, will be interviewed 
about racism and racial violence for the 
KMOV-TV program "Confiuence." It 
will be telecast at 7 a.m., Sunday, May 15. 



100 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



Announcements 



Doors to the Plenaiy Sessions will be 
closed each morning at the beginning of 
the 8:30 a.m. worship service. 

A special service has been arranged to 
provide delegation and other 
remembrance photos. The team of John 
and Jeanean Fulton has a booth set up 
opposite the Cokesbury store where ar- 
rangements for the individualized 
photos can be made. Materials also will 
be distributed to delegation heads 
Thursday morning. 

*** 

Boston University School of Theology 
Alumni/ae Breakfast Meeting, Friday, 
April 29, 7 a.m., Sheraton Hotel, 
Boulevard B Room. 

*** 

Reminder to invited guests: 

World Methodist Council Lxmcheon- 
12:30 p.m., today, April 28, Radisson 
Hotel. 

*** 

Alumni/ae and friends of Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary will 
gather for an evening meal at the 
Boulevard Room of the Sheraton, at 5:45 
p.m. today. Advanced reservations have 
been made; however, an unlimited num- 
ber of seats are available at the door. The 
price is $10 per person. 

All clergywomen who are going to sing 
with the Baltimore clergywomen for 
Saturday services must come for rehear- 
sal at 4:30 p.m., Friday, April 29. Meet by 
the platform next to the piano. 
*** 

A service commemorating persons 
who have died with AIDS will be held 
Friday, April 29, at 12:45 p.m. at Christ 
in the City UCC, 1121 Ninth St. The ser- 
vice is sponsored by Affirmation and the 
Reconciling Congregation Program. 
*** 

The video "Casting Out Fear: Reconcil- 
ing Ministries with Gay/Lesbian United 
Methodists" is being shown daily in the 
Libraiy (lower level) of the Days Inn at 
the Arch. Box limches are available and 
can be reserved by calling 231-5855. 

The Northeastern Jurisdictional 
Caucus of Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal will host an interview session of 
the episcopal candidates in that jurisdic- 
tion in room 270 of the Convention 
Center on April 28 & 29 from 10 p.m. 
until 11:30 p.m. on each evening. 



Children's Choir To Sing 




BeUie Storj 



The Central Illinois United Methodist Ethnic Children's Choir will participate in Thursday's wor- 
ship services. The choir is made up of approximately 50 children in grades 4-6. Members of the 
choir are from: the Hispanic UMC, the Quad Cities; the Korean UMC, Peoria; the Korean Fellow- 
ship, Macomb; Bethel UMC, Peoria; Grace UMC, Springfield; and Northwest and University 
Avenue UMC's, Peoria. Mrs. Pat Capperune is the music director for the choir and serves as music 
director at Northwest UMC in Peoria, Illinois. 



Delegates and friends from the Arkan- 
sas Area (North Arkansas and Little 
Rock conferences) will meet Tuesday, 
May 3, at 12:30 p.m. for a luncheon at the 
Radisson Hotel. The luncheon will be in 
Admiral-A. Honored guests will be 
Bishop and Mrs. Richard Wilke. 
*** 

The Louisiana Delegation will meet for 
breakfast on Monday, May 2 at 7 a.m. m 
Miss Hullings Cafeteria, 11th and Locust. 
All Louisiana residents and friends of 
Louisana are cordially invited to attend. 
Make reservations with Tracy Arnold, 
Sheraton Hotel. 

*** 

The Missouri Area dinner with Bishop 
Handy will be held on Wednesday, May 
4, 5:30 p.m. at the Sheraton Hotel. Reser- 
vations may be made with Jean Scott, 
Missouri East or Fritz Mutti, Missouri 
West. Deadline, Monday, May 2. 
*** 

The Northeastern Jurisdictional C!om- 

mittee on Episcopacy will meet in Room 

260 on Friday and Saturday at 1:00 P.M. 

*** 

Briefing session, Thursday, April 28, 
12:45 p.m.-l:45 p.m., Room 270, Con- 
vention Center. Subject: Aids: Challenge 
to the Churches, chairman. Bishop Edsel 
Ammons; speakers--Dr. Ronald H. 
Sunderland, fellow at the Institute of 
Religion, Houston; Ms. Vanessa Jackson, 



Commxmity Education, Planned Paren- 
thood, St. Louis. 

*** 

Northwest Texas-New Mexico Area 
Dinner, Tuesday, May 3 at 6 p.m. in the 
Delta Room of the Radisson Hotel. Paid 
reservations must be made to chair of 
each delegation by Friday, April 29. 



VIDEO TAPES 

Episcopal Address $29.95 
Lay Address $19.95 

Any segment of 
General Conference $25/hr. 



AUDIO TAPES 

Episcopal and 

Lay Address $7.00 

Custom Audio cassettes $12/hr. 

See Ginny Case at General Church 
Periodicals Booth, Exhibit Hall A 



AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



101 



Bishop WoodJe White, Dr. James 
Laney To Preach for Today's 
Worship Services 

Illinois Area Bishop Woodie W. White 
and Dr. James Laney will lead today's 
worship services. 

Preaching at 8:30 am. in Cervantes 
Convention Center will be Bishop White. 
He became general secretary of the 
General Commission on Religion and 
Race (CORR) when the agency was estab- 
lished in 1968 and served until elected to 
the episcopacy in 1984. He is a member 
of the General Board of Discipleship. 

A native of New York City, Bishop 
White graduated from Paine College in 
Georgia and Boston University School of 
Theology. Ordained in the Detroit An- 
nual Conference, he served churches 
there until joining CORR. 

Bishop White was on a task force to ex- 
amine racism and race relations in 
Australia and New Zealand for the World 
Council of Churches. He has preached in 
Chile, Argentina and Brazil. A prolific 
writer, Bishop White's most recent book 
is Confessions of a Prairie Pilgrim. 

Bishop and Kim White are the parents 
of four daughters. 

Dr. Laney, president of Emory Univer- 
sity, Atlanta, GA., will preach at 2:30 p.m. 
at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, one-half 
block west of the convention center on 
7th Street. 

Ordained in the West Ohio Con- 
ference, Dr. Laney served there before 
beginning his academic career. He was 
an associate professor at Yon Sei Univer- 
sity, Seoul, Korea, and study secretary for 
the Korean Student Christian Council. 
He has been on the faculties of Vander- 
bilt and Harvard divinity schools and 
Chandler School of Theology at Emory. 

Dr. Laney received bachelor and doc- 
torate degrees from Yale and a doctor of 
divinity from Florida Southern. 

Liturgist this aflemoon will be Hope 
Kawashima. A diaconal minister in 
Flushing, N.Y., she is a member of the 
New York delegation to General Con- 
ference. 



General Conference 

audio and video 

resources available 

at sales booth 

outside UM 

Publishing House 

display. 




Innovation Rvins Into Murphy's Law 



For the first time in the history of 
General Conference, delegates are using 
electronic voting. Shown are two views 
of "The Audience Response System"~the 
hand control used by delegates and the 
maze of wires and computerized 
electronic wizardy used to make it all 
work. Conference business manager De- 
Wayne Woodring introduced the system 
during the first plenary session Tuesday, 
but-alas-some bugs turned up. The sys- 
tem recorded about 100 fewer votes than 
the 964 delegates reported as registered. 
Dr. Woodring said the system would be 
rechecked and, for the time being, 
delegates reverted to the familiar raising 
of hands. When it's all working, the 
device will provide an instant tally of yes 
and no votes. In additon to the counts, 
percentages in each category will be cal- 
culated and displayed. Each delegate is 
furnished a key pad on which to record 
his or her vote within nine seconds after 
the presiding officer puts the question. 
Results will appear instantaneously on 
the two large screens at the front of the 
hall. The system is designed to save time 
as well as to ensure accuracy. When a 
vote was required in the past, delegates 
handed tellers either a yes or no card to 
be counted by hand. Woodring notes the 
new system permits not only an instant 
decision, but also allows tellers to remain 
on the floor instead of having to absent 
themselves while they count the tally 
cards. The electronic voting system is 
the second technical innovation to be in- 
augurated during the 1988 General Con- 
ference. The other is the two large 
screens flanking the platform which 
carry close-up television pictures of 
speakers and other participants. 



Directions For Electronic Voting 



1. The presiding officer will state: 

"Please vote when numbers appear on the screen." 

2. Vote anytime during the countdown from 9 through 1. 

3. Press button 1 for yes 

Press button 2 for no 

Press button 3 for abstention. 

4. Votes are recorded only during the numerical countdown. No votes will be 
recorded before or after that countdown. 

5. It is possible to change your vote anytime during the countdown. The computer 
will always accept the last nimiber pressed. 

6. When the countdown reaches zero, the voting is closed and a graph appears on 
the screen indicating the results of the vote. 



m 




1 








|! 










J- 


'i 




m 








(RALPH BAKER PHOTOS) 



102 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



General Conference Thru The Camera Lens 




Roving photographers John Goodwin 
and Ralph Baker have moved in and 
about the Cervantes Convention Center 
as United Methodists in St. Louis moved 
into full steam following the opening ser- 
vice of Holy Communion Tuesday. 
Scenes from the first two days, clockwise 
from top left: Covenant at the Arch Ser- 
vice; Bishop James Ault speaks at the 
Wednesday morning worship; retired 
Bishop Nolan Harmon leads the con- 
ference in prayer; a delegate attempts to 
gain the attention of the presiding officer 
while another (below) waits his turn to 
speak; Western Angola delegates at Com- 
munion Service; and various other 
scenes of delegates in action. 





AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



103 



Nominees For General Conference Secretary 



Carolyn M. MarshaU 



Corporate secretary of Marshall 
Studios, Inc., Veedersburg, Ind., with su- 
pervisory responsibility for accounting, 
scheduling and personnel. 

An active member of Veedersburg 
United Methodist Church, she was 
elected to the 1980, 1984, and 1988 
General Conferences from the South In- 
diana Conference. Has held numerous 
offices on the local church, district, con- 
ference, jurisdictional, and general 
church levels. 

Elected to a four-year term in 1984 as 
president of the Women's Division, 
General Board of Global Ministries. In 
this capacity she heads the 1.2 million 
member United Methodist Women with 



approximately 29,000 local units in the 
U.S. and Puerto Rico. Has been a mem- 
ber of the General Board of Global Min- 
istries since 1980, serving in both the 
Women's and National Divisions. 

Has held state and local offices in the 
American Association of University 
Women, in addition to membership in 
Business and Professional Women and a 
variety of community and civic under- 
takings including treasurer of the local 
chamber of commerce, association for 
retarded citizens and president of the 
high school band boosters. 

Has given countless hours to the 
United Methodist-related Lucile Raines 
residence in Indianapolis. She is past 



president and continues to serve on the 
board. 

Holds an honorary Doctor of Public 
Service degree from DePauw University. 

Has been recognized for skills in or- 
ganization, finance, networking, public 
speaking and commitment to inclusive- 
ness. 

She has traveled extensively overseas 
on behalf of the Women's Division with 
trips to Japan, Korea, and Kenya. 

Her education includes a B.A. in busi- 
ness administration from Drake Univer- 
sity, Des Moines, Iowa; and earlier 



C. Faith Richardson 



Incimibent Secretaiy of the General 
Conference 

Member of the United Methodist 
Church of Newton, Massachusetts, cur- 
rently serving in the Work Area on Mis- 
sions. 

Has held a wide range of official posi- 
tions at local, district, and conference 
level-in Tacoma, Washington; Syracuse, 
New York; and Newton, Massachusetts; 
and in ecumenical bodies in New York 
State and Newton, Massachusetts. A 
member of the Executive Commitee of 
the World Methodist Council. 

1967-1980: Administrative Assistant 
to Bishop James K Mathews, in the Bos- 
ton and Washington Areas. 



1980-1984: Administrative Secretary 
for two Secretaries of the Council of 
Bishops, Bishop Mathews and Bishop 
James Mase Ault. 

In 1968 prepared the first draft for the 
Fimd for Reconciliation. In 1972 began 
to serve on the Committee on Correla- 
tion and Editorial Revision and served as 
chair for two quadrennia. Prepared an 
Index of the Digests of the Decisions of 
the Judicial Council. 

Educated at University of Puget Sound 
and Syracuse University; has an 
honorary doctorate from Columbia Col- 
lege (South Carolina). Is a member of the 
Advisory Board of the Anna Howard 
Shaw Center at Boston University. 



Has lived in the Near East and traveled 
extensively in the United States, 
Canada, and Europe. For 25 years has 
parti-cipated in the organization, work 
and follow-up of several archaeological 
digs in the Eastern Mediterranean. Is the 
author of a number of articles in church 
publications and a translator of scholar- 
ly articles, primarily from Italian and 
French. 

Was a member of the General Commis- 
sion on Archives and History 1984-1988 
and is a member of the Commission on 
Archives and History of the Southern 
New England Conference where she ser- 
ves on an Editorial Board (and one of the 
authors) preparing a History of 
Methodism in Southern New England. 



104 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



Further Updating 
Handbook for Delegates 

(Section A, Advance Edition) 



Standing Administrative Committees (A- 13) Voting and Reserve Delegates 



Committee on Reference 

Remove: John L. Francis 
Add: John L. Hopkins 

Standing Legislative Committees 

Church and Society (A-17) 

Remove: Grey, Vievienne, Texas 
Add: Hathaway, W. B., Texas 

Conferences (A- 18) 

Add: Martins, Filipe S. Manuel, Eastern Angola 

Discipleship (A- 18) 

Add: Castro, George F., Evangelical Philippines 

Faith and Mission (A- 19) 

Remove: Augusta, Joao de Silveira, Eastern Angola 

Financial Administration (A-20) 

Add: Augusta, Joao de Silveira, Eastern Angola 

Local Church (A-24) 
Remove: Augusta, Joao de Silveira, Eastern Angola 



North Mississippi Annual Conference (A-50) 

Remove: Spight, Leon (resigned) 

Add at end of reserve list: 

Bailey, Joe N.; planter; Box 257, Coffeeville, MS 

Texas Annual Conference (A-62) 

Remove: Gray, Vievienne (resigned) 
Add at end of reserve list: McCall, Morris 



Non-Voting Delegates 

Evangelical Methodist Church in the Philippines 

Sec. A, Row 22, Seats 9-10 

Castro, George F. (3); bishop; 1240 General Luna, 

Manila, Philippines 2801 

Alphabetical List of Voting Delegates and First 
Reserves 

Remove: Gray, Vievienne (resigned) 

Spight, Leon (resigned) 
Add: Berry, George, North Mississippi 

McCall, Morris (1), Texas 

Roberts, James, Texas 

Officers of Committee On Plan Of Organiza- 
tion And Rules Of Order 

Bruce P. Blake, Chair 
William McCartney, Vice Chair 
Anita Fenstermacher, Secretary 



Petitions Re-referred by the Committee on Reference 



Old Petition Number 

276-CS-3000-R . 

487-MN-3000-S . 

491-MN-3000-R . 

854-HE-1526-D . 

855-HE-1529-D . 
1248-GM-3000-R 

1467-CS-3000-R . 

1506-IJ-3000-R . 



New Petition Number 

276-FA-3000-R 

487-CS-3000-S 

491-FM-3000-R 

854-MN-1526-D 

855-MN-1529-D 

1248-FA-3000-R 

1467-GM-3000-R 

1506-FA-3000-R 



Old Petition Number 

590-LC-2529-D 

1692-FM-3000-S 

1936-LC-247-D 

2005-CO-703-D 

2025-CO-745-D 

2028-GA-802-D 

2460-GA-3000-R 

2572-MN-3000-R 

2577-MN-3000-R 



New Petition Number 

1590-MN-2529-D 

1692-DI-3000-S 

1936-CS-247-D 
2005-CS-703-D 

2025-CS-745-D 

2028-CS-802-D 

2460-CS-3000-R 

2572-CO-3000-R 
2577-HE-3000-R 



April 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



105 



Addition to Petition 
1017-MN-3000-R 



Epitope 

A basic truth which has motivated the 
work of this commission is that all living 
things change. Some change is construc- 
tive. Some is not. Our deepest searching 
has been to discover what we believe to 
be worthy of preservation for ministry 
and what should be modified. Our com- 
mitment has been to do all in our power 
to enable our church to respond faithful- 
ly to our living Lord. 

Change for the sake of change is an ex- 
ercise in futility and a waste of our valu- 
able resources. To be unmindful of cir- 
cumstances which call for new ways of 



(Ministry Study Report) 

responding to God's call to be a pilgrim 
people is at best, stiff-necked and at 
worst heretical. 



It has not been easy for this commis- 
sion to discern which elements in our 
theology, tradition and structure dearly 
need to be preserved and which should 
be 

changed. The fact that assignments to 
study the ministry were made by the 
General Conferences of 1964, 1968, 
1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 gives 
credence to the fact that our concepts of 
and structures for the enablement of 
ministry are dynamic Some would view 
this phenomenon as a sure sign of in- 
decisiveness. We believe it is a sign of our 



openness to the leading of God to ven- 
ture into new and untried ways. This is 
a familiar biblical theme. 

From the days of Wesley, we have had 
a deep commitment to imderstand scrip- 
ture, and to apply the truths of scripture 
to current situations. It is easier to specu- 
late about the thunder of God in scrip- 
ture than it is to respond faithfully to the 
whisper of God in places where direction 
and outcome are uncertain. In our work, 
we have been faithful to both the bibli- 
cal foundations of ministry and the 
views of our forebears in the faith. 

We are certain the assignment given to 
this commission by the 1984 General 



ASSIGNED VOLUNTEERS MAKE THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS WORK! 

After all the discussion and debating, and after a decision has been reached in a legislative committee on what to do with a peti- 
tion, it is a corps of volunteers from the Missouri Area who take the material from the officers of the legislative committees and 
type up the legislative committee reports that wind up as calendar items on which to vote in a General Conference plenaiy. 

Organized by Jo Ann English, Secretary to Bishop Handy, and Richard Thomas, the assigned volunteer typists for the twelve 
legislative committees are: 



Commission on Central Conference Affairs 

Church and Society 

Conferences 

Discipleship 

Faith and Mission 

Financial Administration 

General Administration 

Global Ministries 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Independent Commissions/Judicial Administration 

Local Church 

Ordained/Diaconal Ministry 



Penny Mohapp 
Hazel Brandel 
Helen Ralston 
Elizabeth Marshall 
PhyUis Buck 
Mary Reinke 
Norma Rawdon 
Sandra Conrad 
June McCullough 
Ginnie Audrain 
Sandy Briggs 
Jean Dalton 



These women, and others who form the Secretarial Pool, will be working in Room 12 1 of the Cervantes Convention Center where 
D. Jean Hanson, Office Manager, and Delia Escareno, Duplicating Supervisor, provide equipment and supplies. 



Consent Calendar 

Calendar items printed with an * 
after the calendar number will 
automatically be placed on the Con- 
sent Calendar. If any delegate wishes 
to remove an item from the Consent 
Calendar for plenary consideration, 
that delegate shall complete the ap- 
proved form in Room 121 by 3:00 
p.m. on the day the calendar item 
first apperars in the DCA. Majority 
and minority reports will be indi- 
cated in parentheses. 

Rule 27(2) 



General Conference audio and video 

resources available at sales booth 

outside UM Publishing House display 




106 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



Legislative Committee Reports 



Church and Society 

•Worked in six committees: 

1. Human Welfare A, Ada Bailor, Sier- 
ra Leone, Chair: Issues include abor- 
tion, AIDS, parenthood. Recommended 
to full committee retention with minor 
changes of present "Social Principles" 
statement on abortion and retaining 
resolution "Responsible Parenthood." 

2. Human Welfare B, Richard Looney, 
Holston, Chair: Issues include human 
sexuality, drug and alcohol concerns. 
Recommended slightly revised "Social 
Principles" paragraph on human 
sexuality retaining the words, "...we do 
not condone the practice of 
homosexual ity . . . . " 

3. Peace and World Order, Jack 
Heacock, SW Texas, Chair: Issues in- 
clude Southern Africa and Shell boycott. 
Recommended resolutions on "In Sup- 
port of Self-Determination and Non-in- 
tervention," "Religious Liberty," institu- 
tion of SheU boycott. 

4. Social and Economic Justice, 
James Lawson, Cal-Pacific, Chair: Is- 
sues are global debt, sexual harassment, 
Afiirmative Action. Worked on resolu- 
tion on "International Debt Crisis." 

5. Environmental Justice and Sur- 
vival, Kay Dillard, N. Illinois, Chair: Is- 
sues include agricultural crisis, nuclear 
safety. Recommended approval of in- 
fant formula resolution. Worked on ex- 
tensive rural crisis resolution. 

6. Political and Human Rights, Char- 
les Harper, N. Texas, Chair: Issues in- 
clude sanctuary, victims' rights, gun con- 
trol. Recommended resolutions affirm- 
ing diversity of language use in the U.S. 
and opposing constitutional amendment 
making English the official language. 

"Lee Ranck and Helen K. Chang 

Conferences 

•Concurred with petition which would 
permit dividing episcopal areas with 
conferences with memberships of more 
than 125,000 each. Would apply to Bir- 
mingham, Atlanta, Indiana and Dallas- 
Fort Worth areas and take effect at the 
end of the 1988 General Conference. 

•Voted non-concurrence with peti- 
tions to set an age limit for election as 
secretary of the General Conference. 

-Ann Whiting 

Diaconal and Ordained Ministry 

•Chair Dan Solomon, SW Texas, asked 
the committee to view people's lives in 
the sensitive issues before the commit- 
tee. 

•Named five sub-committees: 

1. Diaconal Ministry; 

2. Ordained Ministry I; 

3. Ordained Ministiy II; 

4. Superintendency; 

5. Ministiy Study. 



•Approved asking that petitions relat- 
ing to Para. 402.2 (banning ordination of 
homosexuals) be returned to the full 
committee as soon as possible. 

-Daniel R. Gangler 

Discipleship 

•Divided into subgroups: 

1. Hymnal Report, Edward L. Dun- 
can, Mich., Chair; 

1-a. Hymns and Psalms, F. Belton 
Joiner, N.C., Chair; 

1-b. Worship Resources, L. Ray Bran- 
ton, La., Chair; 

2. Other Discipleship Issues, Ann 
Sherer, Texas, Chair; 

2-a. National Youth Ministry Or- 
ganization, Carla Hiehle, West Ohio, 
Chair; 

2-b. Ministries, education, evan- 
gelism, age-level, Warren R. Ebinger, 
Baltimore, Chair; 

2-c. Laity Board, Board of Dis- 
cipleship, Chuck Jones, Cal-Pacific, 
Chair. 

-Garlinda Burton 

Faith and Mission 

•Identified four issues related both to 
the present statement on "Our 
Theological Task" and the report of the 
Commission on the Theological Task: 

1. Pluralism; 

2. The interrelationship of Scripture, 
tradition, reason and experience; 

3. The role of Wesley's Sermons and 
Notes; 

4. The purpose of the commission. 
•Agreed that the role of the sermons 

and notes would be covered by the full 
committee. Sub-committees discussed 
the other issues for report to the full 
committee. 

•Defeated taking a straw ballot to in- 
dicate preferences for the current and 
proposed statements. 

•Approved participation of two 
writers of the commission's report. Dr. 
Thomas Ogletree and Dr. Richard Heit- 
zen rater. 

•Began a paragraph-by-paragraph 
review of the commission's report. 

-Dana Jones and Richard Thornburg 

Financial Administration 

•Divided into four-subcommittees: 

1. Pensions (investments, benefits, 
editorial changes from the General 
Board of Pensions, eta). 

2. Annual Conferences (basic salary 
plans, annual conference budgets, etc.). 

3. General funds (designated giving. 
Ministerial Education Fund, United 
Methodist Publishing House, etc) 

4. Budget 

-Linda Bloom/Clyde Chestnut 

General Administration 

•Divided into four-subcommittees: 



1. Sharon Rader, West Mich., Chair; 

2. William Cherry, East Penn., Chair; 

3. James Seal, N. Ark., Chair; 

4. Reginald W. Ponder, N.C., Chair. 
-Robert F. Storey 

Global Ministries 

•Divided into seven sub-committees: 

1. Health and Welfare and Board of 
Global Ministries (BGM) departments; 

2. National Division; 

3. Mission Evangelism and Women's 
Issues; 

4. Annual Conference, District BGMs 
and Mission Society; 

5. Native Americans, Central Con- 
ferences; 

6. Purposeof BGM, Inclusiveness; 

7. Urban issues, Town/Country, 
Korean issues, Homelessness. 

Higher Education & Chaplaincy 

•Divided into five sub-committees: 

1. Africa Initiative, Lambuth M. 
Clark, Virginia, Chair; 

2. Schools of Theology, John C. Wag- 
ner, West Ohio, Chair; 

3. Annual Conferences and Boards, 
Roy C. Stephenson, Memphis, Chair; 

4. Division of Chaplains, Billy L. York, 
N. Ala., Chair; 

5. Financing, WiZZJam A Ho/mes, Bal- 
timore, Chair. 

•Approved the African Initiative with 
one dissenting vote and established the 
African University Corporation to do ad- 
vance planning in consultation with 
General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration and General Council on 
Ministries. Dr. John Kurewa from Zim- 
babwe spoke during debate. 

"Lester Moore and John Borchert 

Independent Commissions and 
Judicial Administration 

•Approved petition reporting on Com- 
mission on Pan-Methodist cooperation; 

•Approved petition with funding 
recommendation on Pan-Methodist 
cooperation. 

"Betty Story and Arthur Swarthout 

Local Church 

•Divided into sub-committees to con- 
sider more than 300 petitions: 

1. Administrative council, nomina- 
tions and personnel, pastor-parish rela- 
tions committee: Howard Plowman, 
Oklahoma, Chair; 

2. Local church property, James Lee 
Riley, Texas, Chair; 

3. Constitution of charge conference, 
mission and ministry of the local church, 
membership: Paul Blomquist, Detroit, 
Chair; 

4. Charge conference and work areas, 
C. J. Lupo, Jr^ S. C, Chair. 

"Laura Okumu 



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108 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



REPORT OF THE COUNCIL OF BISHOPS TO THE 
GENERAL CONFERENCE 1988 



The General Conference of 1984 took 
two actions regarding the Mission 
Society for United Methodists: (1) The 
Conference voted non-concurrence on a 
petition approving the Mission Society 
for United Methodists as an alternative 
mission- sending agency; and (2) estab- 
lishing a dialogue between the directors 
and staff of the General Board of Global 
Ministries and persons who had con- 
cerns about the emphasis of the Board 
on evangelism and Wesleyan theology. 

The Council of Bishops was suggested 
as the agency to enable and coordinate 
the proposed dialogues. The Council 
subsequently appointed Bishops 
Thomas, DufTey, Ault, Borgen, and De- 
Witt to serve on behalf of the Council. 
Upon Bishop Thomas' resignation, 
Bishop Schowengerdt was named to 
serve. The Mission Society for United 
Methodists was invited to represent per- 
sons who had concerns about the em- 
phasis of the Board on evangelism and 
Wesleyan theology. 

The dialogues began at the site of the 
1984 General Conference and have con- 
tinued on a regular basis. Eleven meet- 
ings have been held. The sessions have 
been congenial and have enjoyed a de- 
gree of success. All parties have been 
faithful in attendance. We express our 
gratitude to the Board for their par- 
ticipation and for bearing the expenses 
of the representatives. We express ap- 
preciation to the representatives of the 
Society for their participation and to the 
Council on Finance and Administration 
for financing the expenses of the repre- 
sentatives of the Society. 

The items receiving attention during 
the dialogues are summarized here: 

1. Review of the actions and anticipa- 
tions of the General Conference. 

2. Issues about procedures as to con- 
fidentiality, mutual trust, account- 
ability. 

3. Discussions about the General 
Board of Global Ministries: personnel, 
policies, practices. 

4. Balance of theological perspectives 
among the staff members of the Board. 

5. Accurate reports as to numbers and 
assignment of Board of Global Mini- 
stries personnel to areas of service. 

6. Recruitment, testing, deployment of 
personnel. 

7. Response to and evaluation of 
materials provided by the Board as re- 
quested by the Society. 

8. Evangelism as an integral part of 
missions. 



9. The Board proposal for an emphasis 
on evangelism. 

10. The Society's assurance that they 
would not send personnel into areas 
where The United Methodist Church 
and the Board of Global Ministries have 
had historic relations and respon- 
sibilities, and, specifically, that they 
would not go to any place where they 
were not invited by the constituted 
church officials. 

11. Evaluation of complaints that 
some Board of Global Ministries person- 
nel had made efforts to block acceptance 
of the Society. 

12. Evaluations of theological state- 
ments by the Society and the Board. 

13. Review of statements of purpose by 
the Board and the Society. 

14. The paper from CIEMAL repre- 
sentatives as referred to this dialogue by 
the Council of Bishops. 

15. Responses of individual bishops 
concerning appointments of clergy to 
the Society. 

16. Financial accountability. 

The representatives of the Society 
clearly indicated their strong support for 
full payment of World Service Appor- 
tionments and the full support of Ad- 
vance Mission Specials. The entire 
dialogue group fully endorsed the 
Bishop's Appeal for Partner Churches in 
Crises. 

The financial data of the Board is a 
matter of open record for the denomina- 
tion and is available annually. The 
Society is a member of the Evangelical 
Council for Financial Accountability and 
reports to that body. Further, the 
Society sent a copy of their balance sheet 
to the Board of Global Ministries for 
their information. 

While the Society has clearly stated its 
firm intention to continue as a separate 
entity, they have also stated that they 
desire not a competitive stance but a 
cooperative, supplementary one. Their 
intention was declared to be to go to 
areas where no United Methodist work 
exists and to open new areas of work 
with both a personal evangelistic thrust 
and a wholistic social involvement. 

The Board representatives discussed 
freely the complaints registered con- 
cerning evangelism and theology. They 
have insisted that evangelistic missions 
are part of their overall ministry. They 
have affirmed the legitimacy of various 
theological emphases but denied that 
the Board staff and personnel are 
dominated by a liberation theology. 
They specifically denied making ap- 



pointments of missionaries who support 
liberation theology to the excliision of 
others with a more traditional evangeli- 
cal theology. 

The Board shared with the Society in- 
formation concerning recruitment, test- 
ing, and deployment of personnel and in- 
vited the Society to have an observer at 
the Board missionary personnel com- 
mittee. This option was not exercised by 
the Society. 

The Board has put into effect changes 
of structure and personnel that had been 
in progress for some time. The recent ac- 
tions of the Board in establishing a Com- 
mittee on Evangelism with an associate 
general secretary in charge of that em- 
phasis is a case in point. The Board has 
also taken steps to establish dearer lines 
of accountability within the structure 
and operation of the Board. The General 
Board has opened up quite a large num- 
ber of new areas of work and a variety of 
mission ministries. 

The statement from a CIEMAL 
workshop, April 1986, read to the Coun- 
cil of Bishops of The United Methodist 
Church by representatives from 
CIEMAL was referred to this committee 
and has received careful attention. The 
workshop paper alleged that repre- 
sentatives of the Mission Society had in- 
itiated work in Columbia, Peru, and 
Chile and had created division and con- 
fusion. These contacts were reported to 
have begun around 1980. The fact is that 
the Society was not organized until 
Februaiy, 1984. Thus, there were no rep- 
resentatives of the Society involved. It is 
true that at least one person who was in- 
volved in the earlier visits has since af- 
filiated with the Society. CIEMAL com- 
plained that Society representatives 
entered Columbia without consultation 
with CIEMAL, who was sponsoring the 
church in that country. The Society 
maintains that it responded to the desig- 
nated leadership of the church in Colum- 
bia and believed they had acted proper- 
ly- 

Misunderstandings still exist in those 
countries. More recent correspondence 
from CIEMAL affirms the confidence 
they have in the integrity of the wit- 
nesses of the April 1986 meeting and 
continues to affirm their understanding 
that the work of the Society is divisive 
and intrusive. CIEMAL affirms that all 
relations to The United Methodist 
Church should be through the General 
Board of Global Ministries. CIEMAL has 
expressed concern about the efforts of 
the Society in Brazil. 



AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



109 



Recent correspondence indicates com- 
plaints from Austria where disruption 
and distrust have developed. The cor- 
respondent indicates a clear connection 
with the Mission Society for United 
Methodists. 

The theological statement concerning 
mission that was developed by the Board 
in cooperation with Partners in Mission 
around the world was studied and criti- 
qued. The discussion produced several 
suggestions for clarification and em- 
phasis, and the Board representatives 
indicated they world consider these in 
future editions of the pamphlets. 

Concerning the appointment of clergy 
to the Society, the dialogue discussed the 
specific actions of the General Con- 
ference as well as the responsibilities of 
individual bishops. The General Con- 
ference voted non-concurrence to a peti- 
tion asking for approval of the Society as 
a sending agency. In the view of many 
this action has placed appointment of 
clergy to the Society in a distinctly dif- 
ferent category. Bishops have to deal 
with this matter individually. 

After all the discussions we have not 
been able to resolve all the matters 
before us. There still exist differences 
concerning the theology of mission and 
evangelism. Different definitions are 
held about the term evangelical. Dif- 



ferences exist about confidence in the 
staff and personnel of both the Board 
and the Society. Differences continue as 
to public debate and release of informa- 
tion from dialogues and about the Board 
and the Society. Strong difierences re- 
late to the accuracy and intent of the ac- 
tions of and reports from CIEMAL. Dif- 
ferences continue as to responsibility for 
and response to the indigenous chur- 
ches. We have differences about appoint- 
ments to and the sending out of person- 
nel by the Society. Finally, there are 
sharp differences as to the desirability of 
the continued existence of the Society as 
a sending agency. 

In conclusion, we make the following 
recommendations: 

1. We are glad that much has been 
rediscovered about our Wesleyan tradi- 
tion and recommend that United 
Methodists continue to make progress 
toward the fulfillment of the General 
Conference expressed desire that we 
clarify and enhance our emphasis upon 
this tradition, particularly in evangelism 
and theology. 

2. We recommend that this dialogue be 
discontinued in its present form, that we 
reaffirm the stance the 1984 General 
Conference took naming the General 
Board of Global Ministries as the only 
authorized sending agency of The 



United Methodist Church, and that the 
Board of Global Ministries continue to 
be open for informal conversations with 
all of its constituency, including in- 
dividuals and groups, in making 
progress in emphasizing evangelism and 
in continued refmement of theological 
emphases in line with our Wesleyan un- 
derstanding. 

3. In the beginning the Council of 
Bishops representatives had hoped that 
we would be able to reach such recon- 
ciliation of issues that the Society would 
fmd no reason for its continued exist- 
ence. In the beginning some repre- 
sentatives of the Mission Society for 
United Methodists indicated the under- 
standing that the Society would con- 
tinue indefinitely. The bishops have 
sought to effect reconciliation but have 
not reached the level of our expectations. 
We have no alternative but to report this 
situation and to make our recommenda- 
tion that persons share concerns 
through regular channels and their com- 
mitment to ministry through the 
authorized sending agency. 

THE COUNCIL OF BISHOPS 

Earl G. Hunt, Jr., President 
Paul A. Duffey, Secretary 
April 26, 1988 



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110 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 28, 1988 



Ministry of the Laity: 

What It Means To Be Disciples Every Day 



The Laity Address as presented by 
Joan G. Nagle, Wednesday morning 
April 27. 

Speaking to His people in the book of 
Joshua, the Lord said: 

Now therefore arise, go over this Jor- 
dan, thou, and all this people, into the 
land which I do give to them, even to the 
children of Israel. And Joshua said unto 
the people. Sanctify yourselves; for 
tomorrow the Lord will do wonders 
among you. 

And Joshua said imto the children of 
Israel, Hereby ye shall know that the 
living God is among you.. ..Behold the 
ark of the covenant of the Lord of all the 
earth passeth over before you into Jor- 
dan.. ..And it shall come to pass, as soon 
as the soles of the feet of the priests that 
bear the ark of the Lord shall rest in the 
waters of Jordan, that the waters of Jor- 
dan shall be cut off, and they shall stand 
upon an heap. 

Hereby ye shall know that the living 
God is amongyou.... because you get such 
very strange marching orders. Let us put 
ourselves into this scene. 

And Joshua said...."Okay, that's the 
play. All you have to do is make the 
move. Pick up the box, take a couple of 
steps forward, until your feet are wet. 
The waters pile up; you go across. Got 
it?" 

And Joe Disciple said. ...Uh... .you 
wanna run that past me one more time? 

"Oy, the help I get these days. All 
right, let me get a pushbroom and draw 
you a picture. Pick up the box". 

I already got the box, boss. 

"Good. Now step forward...." 

It probably went something like this, 
for Joshua's followers. One-step-at-a- 
time discipleship. It goes something like 
this for us, too. 

"Pick up the box." 

Shoulder the load. Sign on, make the 
commitment. To be a disciple, in the 
United Methodist context, means to 
agree to the principles of the Christian 
faith, to promise, confess, profess. And 
to pledge loyalty to this body of the faith. 
And then to walk away from the altar? 
Certainly not. The pledge includes a 
commitment to action: "to uphold it by 
your prayers, your presence, your gifts, 
and your service." 

To uphold the ministry of Christ is to 
pick up the box of discipleship, and I 
believe that most of those who make this 
promise do so. They shoulder the 
load.. ..they shoulder the most amazing 
loads. You have seen the ministry of the 



laity in action as I have. We have seen 
laymen and women work harder, longer, 
and more humbly for Christ than they 
ever would for themselves, let alone a 
secular employer. 

Discipleship is not easy. It is one of the 
paradoxes of discipleship that the work 
we are paid-paid real money-to do re- 
quires so much less effort than does 
volunteer work. In the secular work 
place, the resources are, by and large, 
better. The tools and the technology one 
needs are provided. ...none of this 
making do with what we can scrounge 
out of the Simday school cupboard or 
bring to the church kitchen from our 
own. The people are provided, 
too.... coworkers and service groups to 
help cariy the box, without (in most 
cases) being coaxed. Discipleship, on the 
other hand, usually means doing it the 
hard way. 

Discipleship may mean doing for love 
what we would never dream of doing for 
money. I remember seeing my mother 
and her friends scrubbing, literally 
scraping down, a tenement unit for use 
as a mission house. The ladies had never 
seen such filth before and, God willing, 
they never would again, but in this mo- 
ment the word of the Lord was 
"Scrape!"....and they scraped. 

Discipleship means coming early and 
staying late; this is upholding by our 
presence. Woody Allen has said that 90 
percent of success is showing up. And at 
the General Conference held in Pitts- 
burgh many years ago, an event which 
was plagued by pre-opening problems, 
the invocation began, "At least, Lord, we 
are here." To show up is, sometimes, to 
shoulder the load; it is all the box-pick- 
ing-up we can manage at the moment. 

Joshua's people had shown up. At 
least. Lord, we are here. We've got the 
box. 

"Good," Joshua says. "Now step for- 
ward. Come on, another step~you can do 
it." 

It is a good thing to pick up the box. 
Sad to say, it is not the thing of which 
progress is made. You've got to pick up 
the box and carry it forward, Joshua tells 
us. 

To be a disciple means to be in motion. 
Perpetual motion, many of us would say, 
much of the time. More than that, for- 
ward motion. In physics, there is a con- 
cept called the vector. Webster defines a 
vector as "a directed magnitude, as of a 
force or a velocity." Another reference 
says that a vector may be regarded as a 
stepping from one extremity of a line to 




John Goodwin 

another. Actually, it's not that hard. Just 
think of a well-hit baseball.. ..magnitude 
and (whoosh) direction, force, velocity. 

Disciples are vectors of God, directed 
magnitudes, whose force and velocity 
have moved irresistibly along many a 
line, carrying the word and the works of 
the faith. 

Disciples scout the territory ahead as 
they move forward. My annual con- 
ference is planning for an innovative 
fund-raising campaign....a campaign to 
raise up a permanent endowment, to 
equip and enable the ministry of the fu- 
ture. What is the ministry of the future? 
We can't even guess; all we know is that 
it will be different from the ministry of 
the present. (And, of course, that it will 
require serious money!) But as we are 
mindful of the heritage of ministry that 
we have received from those who 
marched this line before us, we recognize 
our responsibility to fund that which will 
follow. 

Disciples, then, are carriers. They are 
on their way, out of Egypt into the 
promised land of the future, and they are 
carrying the ark of the covenant as they 
go. 

But there are obstacles in the way, 
obstacles to which Joshua seems 
oblivious. "Take another step forward," 
he coaxes. "Take the big step this time." 

Hey look. Josh. There's water out 
there. If I go any farther, I'm gonna get 
my feet wet. I could catch a cold. 

What it means to be a disciple of Christ 
is, sometimes, trouble. A veritable sea of 
troubles, perhaps. Reminded of the 
enormity of the problems she faces in 
her mission field. Mother Teresa of India 
responded, "God has not called me to 
succeed. He has only called me to try." 
He has called us to get our feet wet, and 
that may mean catching a cold. Or 
worse. 

Discipleship can mean failure. And in 
fact if you have never failed....never 



April 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



111 



dropped the load or tripped over your 
own feet.. ..I suggest that you may have 
been carrying very little or marching 
very slowly. I've been allowed only 20 
minutes here, and that isn't half enough 
time to list all my failures in discipleship, 
all the plans I made that didn't work out, 
or that worked out but profited nothing. 
But if you want to see me afterwards.... 

....No? Well, discipleship can mean 
rejection. Rejection by the world? Of 
course; we expect that. Rejection by our 
fellow marchers and our own leaders is 
more of a surprise, and harder to deal 
with. I respectfully submit that the 
church today has a serious problem in 
clergy-laity relations, and I challenge 
this body to begin to address it. That 
problem is one of an increasingly sophis- 
ticated laity and a clergy that often feels 
threatened by the troops.. ..and reacts by 
pulling rank. 

Last year I talked to the captain of one 
of the Navy's nuclear submarines, and I 
was siUT)rised to hear him use terms like 
discussion, consensus, mutual accord. 

"Are you trying to tell me that the Navy 
is into participative management. Cap- 
tain?" I asked. "Do you let your crew vote 
on your orders?" 

"Not in battle!" he answered. "In bat- 
tle, you give orders, and you expect com- 
pliance. But basically, battles are won by 
teamwork. The way we build a team that 
will win the battle is to respect one 
another, learn from one another, come 
to agreement with one another." 

More and' more church members are 
spending five days a week in environ- 
ments like this, where they participate 
in management. They expect to be 
respected no less in their efforts for the 
Lord. 

"All right, all right" Joshua says, roll- 
ing his eyes heavenward. "Wouldn't you 
like to.. ..don't you agree that it would be 
a good idea to take a big step forward?" 

Now we get to the hard part. So far we 
have been dealing with what we 
know.. ..picking up boxes and cariying 
them forward and overcoming obstacles. 
DifTicult, perhaps, but familiar. So far I 
have been talking about what it means 
to be a disciple in terms of what it has 
meant to me over several decades of dis- 
cipleship. But that's not the sum total of 
the marching orders that the Lord spoke 
to us through Joshua. The Lord did not 
intend for us to carry our loads up to the 
river's edge, and then stop. 

Standing on the bank, on the brink, we 
remember an old hynan.... 

On Jordan's stormy banks I stand and 
cast a wishful eye 

To Canaan's fair and happy land, 
where my possessions lie. 

Joshua urges us on. "Claim your pos- 
sessions. Claim the unknown territory. 



the excitement of the ministry of the 
living God. Step out, into the future." 

Yea, right, says Joe Disciple. That's 
easy for you to say, fella. The way I read 
this playbook, you're gonna be the one 
standing on the shore with the clip- 
board. I'm gonna be the one who 
drowns. 

Robert G. Allen gives "success semi- 
nars" all over the country. In each of 
these, he asks the participants to write 
down the single greatest obstacle block- 
ing their way. He says that the number- 
one obstacle is always the same: the fear 
of failure. 

"What if you weren't afraid to fail?" he 
asks. "If rejection and anxiety didn't 
bother you, it would change your life, 
wouldn't it?" If it wasn't wet out there, if 
we of the Christian laity weren't afraid 
of drowning, it would change the world, 
wouldn't it? 

Allen teaches his students five steps to 
success (more stepwise discipleship!). 
They begin with "Have a dream worth 
failing for," and end with one simple 
word: "Jump!" 

Let's make a deal, Joshua Show me 
the waters piled up in a heap first, and 
then I'll jump. 

Unfortunately and incredibly, that's 
not the way it works. No deals, no 
guarantees. You have to take the first 
step, says Joshua.. ..says God. Faith 
precedes the miracle. For 40 years, the 
people of Israel wandered miserably in 
the wilderness; for centuries the people 
of God waited expectantly for the 
miracle of redemption. 

It happened. The Jordan was crossed; 
the Messiah came, to them and to us. 
Because it happened, drowning.. ..and 
death... are swallowed up in victory. 
Still, every day, we are called to believe, 
and then to jump. 

What does it mean to be a Christian 
disciple, to follow our redeeming Lord? 
I confess.... now, finally.. ..that I do not 
know. I have been carrying boxes up and 
down the river's edge for half a centuiy, 
but I do not know exactly what will hap- 
pen whenever.. ..each time.. ..the soles of 
my feet hit the water. 

Many years ago, when our children 
were small, we had an opportunity to 
take them with us on a great trip, a 9- 
week tour of Europe in a camper bus. 
There were only two problems: we had 
never been abroad before, and we had 
never camped before. When we dis- 
cussed our plans with the children, we 
took great pains not to call the trip a 
vacation, but an adventure. We knew 
that, inevitably, there would be some dif- 
ficult situations and unpleasant times. 
And we could imagine nine weeks of 
hearing, "This is what you turkeys call a 
vacation?" 



There were indeed difficulties and xm- 
pleasantnesses on the trip, and it was an 
adventure, and it did change our 
lives. ...all of our lives. Because we 
jumped, into very unfamiliar waters, we 
are not the same four people we were, or 
would have been. 

Jumping changes things. Jumping is 
altogether different from picking up the 
load and carrying it. Jumping gets 
results. When all the kings of all the 
peoples on the other side of the Jordan 
heard what happened when Joshua's fol- 
lowers jumped into the river, their 
hearts melted, we are told. Neither was 
there spirit in them any more to resist 
the forward march of the children of Is- 
rael. 

As followers of Christ, today and every 
day, we are called to jump. We are called 
to faith, trust, adventure in the service 
of our Lord, who admitted that he sends 
us forth as lambs among wolves. Who 
would respond to marching orders like 
those? Would you, disciple? 

Ah, times are bad. A person has to look 
out for himself, think about the future. 
Maybe I could stand getting my feet wet, 
a little bit, but as soon as I do that, you're 
gonna push me another step, and then I 
will be in deep water.. ..in over my head. 

What do you say to that, Joshua? 
What do you say to that, God? 

God says, "My dear chOd, did I ever 
push you?" 

And we must answer, "No, Lord. 
Never." 

God never pushes us into the water. 
He only loves us. Loves us into faith and 
action....into response to His love. 

He only stands, as He stood on another 
piece of watery real estate in another 
Testament, and stretches out His hand, 
and says, "Come." 

The ministry of the laity is a life of high 
adventure. "I am come that you might 
have life, and that you might have it 
more abundantly," is the way Jesus 
defined it. 

To be disciples every day is to sanctify 
ourselves. To become, in God's grace, the 
holy people he has called forth, to do 
wonders among, starting tomorrow. 
Starting, perhaps, this very afternoon! 

It is, then, to wet our feet in the waters 
of the Jordan. To see the waters rolled 
back, our way made smooth and dry by 
the hand of our God. To stop on the 
other side, for a moment, and raise an 
altar, as Joshua's people did, so that our 
children will know the might of the 
Lord. And then to set up camp and sleep. 

Not understanding why we must get 
our feet wet, again tomorrow, probably, 
but knowing that He who bids us come 
is waiting on the other side. 

Knowing that.. ..eternally.. ..we will be 
saved. 



112 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 28, 1988 



Legislative Committee Reports 



0001 CCOOl 

Subject: Conference of Methodist 
Bishops 

Petitions: 537-CC-527-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-63 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 28; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 
The petition will read as foUows: 
There shall be a conference of 
Methodist bishops, composed of all the 
bishops elected by the jurisdictional and 
central conferences and one bishop or 
chief executive officer from each af- 
filiated autonomous Methodist or 
United church, which shall meet on call 
of the Council of Bishops after consult- 
ation with other members of the con- 
ference of Methodist bishops. The travel 
and other necessary expense of bishops 
of affiliated autonomous Methodist or 
United churches related to the meeting 
of the conference of Methodist bishops 
shall be paid on the same basis as that of 
bishops of The United Methodist 
Church. 

Voted concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

0002 CC002 

Subject: Conference of Methodist 
Bishops 

Petitions: 768-CC-527-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-63 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 29; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 25, 1988 

Voted nonconcurrence because of the 
approval of petition #537-CC-527-D, 
which dealt with identical subject mat- 
ter. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0003 CC003 

Subject: Becoming a Covenanting 

Church 

Petitions: 1078-CC-600-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-67 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 26; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 

This petition, calling for means of 
developing the common bonds between 
different churches, was adopted with the 
following amendments: 

Lines 2 and 8 were amended by strik- 
ing Chri s tian and inserting in place 



there of Methodist and other af- 
filiated United churches. 

The rationale for this amendment is 
that in some countries the possibUities 
for common cause, mutual support, 
spiritual growth, study of Scripture, eta, 
at this time, can most effectively be 
achieved through Methodist and other 
affiliated United churches. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0004 CC004 

Subject: Composition of Central 

Conference 

Petitions: 2166-CC-637-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA 

Membership: 39; Present 30 

For 0; Against 26; Not Voting 1 

Date: AprU 25, 1988 

This petition, unpublished in the 
DCA, reads as follows: 

Par. 637.1 (page 286) should be 
amended as follows: tho ministorial 
momborc oloctod by the minietoriol mom 
bors of tho annual conforonco and tho 
lay mombors thoroof , and substitute: 
elected by the whole body of the an- 
nual conference, virhich includes all 
ministerial and lay members. 

The commission voted nonconcur- 
rence, as Indicated above, in favor of 
retaining the ciurent method of mini- 
sterial members being elected by the 
ministerial members of the annual con- 
ference and lay members being elected 
by the lay members. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0005 CC005 
Subject: Property-Holding 
Authority of Central Conference 

Petitions: 904-CC-638-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 29; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 25, 1988 

The commission recommends concur- 
rence with the petition to amend Par. 
638.28 by deleting of Tho United 
Mothodifit Church and . 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0006 CC006 

Subject: Itineration of Bishops in 

Central Conferences 

Petitions: 1449-CC-638-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA 

Membership 39; Present 30 

For 0; Against 26; Not Voting 1 

Date: AprU 25, 1988 

A petition, unpublished in the DCA, 
reads as follows: 

Amend Par. 638.6: A Central Con- 
ference, in consultation with the bishops 
of that Central Conference, shall fix the 
episcopal areas and residences and make 
assignments to them of the bishops who 
are to reside in that Central Conference. 
The bishops of a Central Conference 
shall arrange the plan of episcopal visita- 
tion within its bounds. In nations 
where there are multiple bishops 
let the provision for itineration of 
bishops apply as in Jurisdictional 
Conferences. 

Because of language, culture, and 
other major considerations, the commis- 
sion recommended nonconcurrence, as 
indicated above. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0007 CC007 

Subject: Autonomous Methodist 

Churches 

Petitions: 161-CC-647-D$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 4; Against 17; Not Voting 4 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 

This petition, calling for a quadren- 
nial review of the autonomous 
Methodist churches, by the CouncU of 
Bishops and the General Board of 
Global Ministries, with the purpose of 
their eventually becoming affiliated 
autonomous churches, was deemed by 
the commission to be an exercise in inap- 
propriate pressure on the autonomous 
Methodist churches. 

Voted non-concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



113 



0008 CC008 

Subject: Act of Covenanting 

Chiu-ches 

Petitions: 1076-CC-647-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 24; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 25, 1988 

A retitling of Section V: Chapter Five, 
making provision for the Act of 
Covenanting Churches. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0009 CC009 

Subject: Definition of Autonomous 
Methodist Chiu-ch and Entering 
Into Covenantal Relationship 

Petitions: 1085-CC-647-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 24: Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 25, 1988 

A petition designating an autonomous 
Methodist church as a self-governing 
church which has not entered into the 
Act of Covenanting with The United 
Methodist Church. 

Voted concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0010 CCOIO 

Subject: An Act of Covenanting 

Petitions: 1077-CC-648-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 19: Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprO 25, 1988 

A petition defining how an Act of 
Covenanting (Par. 650) between an 
autonomous Methodist church and The 
United Methodist Church creates the 
relationship known as affiliated 
autonomous Methodist church. 

Voted concurrence. 



( ) Concurrence 



) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0011 ccon 

Subject: Concordat Agreements 

Petitions: 542-CC-652-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-67 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 26; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 

This petition is an amendment to Par. 
652.3a and b, defming the processes for 
developing a concordat relationship be- 
tween a church and The United 
Methodist Church. 

Voted concurrence. 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

0012 CC012 

Becoming Part of The United 

Methodist Church 

Petitions: 160-CC-653-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-67 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 7; Against 16; Not Voting 5 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 

A petition defming the manner in 
which a church applies for membership 
in a central or provisional central con- 
ference. 

Voted nonconcurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



0013 CC013 

Subject: Executive Committee on 

Commission on Central Affairs 

Petitions: 565-CC-2301-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-120 
Membership 39; Present 30 
For 27; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 25, 1988 

A petition empowering the executive 
committee of the Commission on 
Central Conference Affairs to act on be- 
half of the commission during the inter- 
im between General Conferences. 

Voted concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



00014 CC014 

Subject: A Proposed New Central 

Africa Conference 

Petitions: 2662-CC-636-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

the Advance DCA 

Membership 39; Present 30 

For 28; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 25, 1988 

A new petition, unpublished in the Ad- 
vance DCA, from the Central Africa Con- 
ference, proposing an increase in the 
number of episcopal areas in the Central 
Africa Conference from seven (7) to 
eight (8). 

Because of significant numerical 
growth in our church in this region, the 
commission recommends concurrence as 
indicated above. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



114 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



Proceedings of the 1988 General Conference of 
The United Methodist Chiu-ch 



Conunittee On Joiu-nal 
Report 

The Committee on Journal 

hereby certifies as accurate, with the 
following corrections, the proceedings 
as printed in the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate for Tuesday, April 26, 1988. 

Daily Edition, p. 86, col. 1, 1. 36-37: 
"votes yea and nay options." 

Daily Edition, p. 86, col. 1, par. 3: 
Woodring said, 'You folks out there 
don't know how relieved I am" (not 
Bishop Hunt). 

Daily Edition, p. 87, col. 1, 1. 22: 
(After malfunction of the voting 
process. Bishop Hunt continued.) 

Daily Edition, p. 91, col. 2, par. 9: 
Bishop Hunt responds to Cleveland's 
question: BISHOP HUNT: These rules 
are from the 1984 Session and they ob- 
tain until the 1988 rules have been 
adopted. 

Daily Edition, p. 91, col. 3, par. 1: 
Bishop Duffey places Dr. Faith 
Richardson in nomination (not 
Cleveland). 

Daily Edition, p. 91, col. 3: 6th 
speaker should be PHILLIPS instead 
ofMOTT. 

Daily Edition, p. 91, col. 3: All cita- 
tions attributed to BISHOP DUFFEY 
should read BISHOP HUNT, who was 
presiding. 

Daily Edition, p. 92, col. 1, par. 2: 
Bishop Hunt is speaking, not Bishop 
Duffey. 

Jamima DeMarcus (chair) 



Wednesday Morning 
April 27, 1988 

Bishop Arthur Kulah, presiding 

BISHOP KULAH: The second session 
of the 1988 General Conference is called 
to order. Good morning to all. 

DELEGATES: Good morning. Bishop 
Kulah. 



BISHOP KULAH: I just signed for 
Bishop James Ault of the Pittsburgh Area 
to come and lead us in our devotion. 

(Morning Devotions) 



MARCUS FANG (Wisconsin): The Ad- 
dress Search Committee issued a call for 
participation from all the conferences. In- 
terested laypersons were invited to submit 
their speeches on the subject: "Ministry of 
the Laity-What it Means to be Disciples 
Everyday," and we placed a 20-minute 
limit on these speeches. We received a 
total of 324 manuscripts. The Search 
Committee was determined at the very 
outset to ensure that the search process 
would be characterized by total fair- 
ness.. .Mr. Clean operation, if you will. Ac- 
cordingly, all identifications were 
removed from each manuscript before it 
was sent to a panel of screeners, who were 
inclusive of gender, race, and jurisdiction- 
al affiliation. The four finalists identified 
by the screeners delivered their speeches 
before a panel of impartial judges during 
the annual meeting of the National As- 
sociation of Annual Conference Lay 
Leaders. The presenter of the 1988 Laity 
Address emerged from this process. 

It is my honor and privilege to introduce 
to you Joan Nagle, a member of First 
United Methodist Church, Murraysville, 
and of the Western Pennsylvania Con- 
ference. A chemist by training, Joan is a 
senior engineer with a mjgor corporation 
and editor of a professional journal for en- 
gineers. Joan has served The United 
Methodist Church in a number of 
capacities over the years-lay leader, 
church school teacher, United Methodist 
Women president, trustee, COSROW 
commissioner. United Methodist Founda- 
tion member-the list goes on. My sisters 
and brothers, it is with great pleasure and 
pride that I present to you, Joan Nagle. 
(applause) 

(The full text of the Laity Address is 
found elsewhere in this edition.) 



BISHOP KULAH: Yes, back there, (in- 
audible) Is it working? Is it on? (inaudible) 
please. 



DONALD JOINER (Western Pennsyl- 
vania (Conference): Mr. President, 
delegates of this General Conference, 
guests and visitors. I request the distinct 
honor and the exciting privilege to express 
our thanks and deep appreciation to Joan 
Nagle for her outstanding and challenging 
address. She is from the Murraysville 
Church, Greensburg District, located 25 
miles east of Pittsburgh. As her District 
Superintendent, I speak for our delega- 
tion, her husband, Elliot, and mother who 
are present with us, and for all of the body 
here today in applauding Joan for her 
splendid afilrmation of the faith, her 
Lord, and her challenging us all to dis- 
cipleship. I invite all of us to again applaud 
Joan in deep appreciation for gratitude 
and joy in this great experience. Thank 
you. (applause) 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much on behalf of the General Con- 
ference. Sister Joan, we would like to ex- 
press our thanks and appreciation to you 
for this splendid speech you have given. It 
is a challenge to all of us, and we pray and 
hope that this conference is going to learn 
from what you have said and move for- 
ward as a result of your speech. Thank you 
very much. At this time I will call on the 
publishing house to come forward and 
present a gift. Robert Feaster, Dr. Robert 
Feaster. 

ROBERT FEASTER: This 1988 
(General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church is one of those rare oc- 
casions when more than one hymnal ap- 
pears on the desks of the delegates. In fact, 
this may be the only General Conference 
when not two but three hymnals have ap- 
peared on your desks, for in addition to the 
normal General Conference edition of the 
present Book of Hymns were the 
recipients of the work of the Hymnal 
Revision Committee whose work will be 
considered at this General Conference for 
adoption as a first United Methodist hym 
nal. But on this occasion. The United 
Methodist Publishing House has dis 
tributed to you last night a third hymnal 
This facsimile copy of John Wesley's first 
hymnbook was distributed with our com 
pliments to all delegates in official atten 
dance at this General Conference. 

One of the first matters that John Wes- 
ley attended to on his arrival in Charles- 



AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



115 



ton on Thursday, April 14, in the year 
1737, was the printing of a collection of 
hymns and psalms which he began using 
in the summer of 1737. At the publishing 
house we faithfully duplicated every detail 
of that 1737 hymnal, a special edition, to 
help commemorate the 200th anniversary 
of The United Methodist Publishing 
House. John Wesley was the example to 
the early Methodists as they engaged in 
publishing, and it was at St. George's 
Church in Philadelphia that John Dickens 
would, in 1789, become the 
denomination's first book steward and 
make the newly authorized Methodist 
Book Concern a reality. 

Beginning now at this General Con- 
ference and extending through 1989, The 
United Methodist Publishing House will 
sponsor a number of events to celebrate its 
200th anniversary year, and we hope that 
by receiving this gift of John Wesley's first 
hymnal, you will begin to help us celebrate 
immediately. Thank you very much, (ap- 
plause) 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
kindly. I now call on Sister Faith 
Richardson to come and present to us the 
trustees of the old John Street UMC 
board. Sister Richardson. 

FAITH RICHARDSON: The Deed of 
Trust of the John Street UMC of New 
York City calls for the election of the 
church's board of trustees by the General 
Conference. This has been done since 
1868. Therefore, on behalf of the Charge 
Conference of John Street UMC of New 
York City, I present their nominees to you 
as follows, these trustees to serve for the 
period 1988 to 1992. The resident bishop 
of the New York Annual Conference, 
Mary Elizabeth Hurt, Marjorie Domes, 
Warren L. Jurvey, William C. Kirkwood, 
Raynor R. Rogers, Steven Rose, William T. 
Staubach Jr., L. Rose Sanune. These 
names are before you. Bishop Kulah. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you. The 
names cited for you for election. Those 
who will have these persons elected, show 
their hands; those against? They are 
elected. Thank you. 

RICHARDSON: Then I am to present 
the nominees for the Interjurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy. These are 
found in your Advance DCA pp. A-81-82. 
The names listed here are those I received 
from the delegations of annual conferen- 
ces in the five jurisdictions. However, on 
p. A-82 in the Southeastern Jurisdiction, 
since the list was printed, I have received 



three changes. May I give them to you, 
please? 

BISHOP KULAH: Yes, please. 

RICHARDSON: For the North 
Alabama Annual Conference, clergy 
column, to replace Paul M. Gauntt, is 
Ralph K. Bates. In the lay column, to 
replace Mollie Stewart is Leon C. Ham- 
rick. The Red Bird Missionary Con- 
ference, clergy colunm, to replace David 
Allen, J. Jamison Brunk. These nominees 
are before you. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, the 
nominees are before you for election. 
Those who would have these persons 
elected..., yes, not before 10, please. 

RETA BARTO (Eastern Pennsylvania): 
The Reverend Claude Edmonds will 
replace the Reverend Henry Nichols for 
Eastern Pennsylvania Conference. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, would you 
say that? All right, will you say that? 

RICHARDSON: Claude Edmonds to 
replace Henry Nichols. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. Next? Microphone either 4 or 9. 
Four. You would realize this morning that 
you have an African presiding, and 
English is not my first language. There- 
fore, I will ask that you speak very slowly 
so that I will be able to understand. Thank 
you. Go ahead. 

JEAN SCOTT (Missouri East): Roslyn 
Sykes, laity, will replace John Martin, 
laity. 

BISHOP KULAH: Missouri East, all 
right. 

RICHARDSON: Roslyn Sykes is listed. 

SCOTT: Is she? Thank you. 

BISHOP KULAH: She is listed, thank 
you. Are there other nominations? All 
right, those who will have these persons 
elected, show their hands. Those against? 
They are elected. Thank you. All right, 
thank you veiy much. We now call on Dr. 
Frank Nestler, with the Committee on 
Planning, Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order. This is the ending of what we 
started yesterday. 

FRANK NESTLER: We're back to Ad- 
vance Edition B, Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order. We'll 
start now and go through it in order, since 
we lifted up the matters that were of con- 
cern yesterday that needed to be com- 
pleted. I think, in many instances, I will 
merely make some comments about the 
changes as we go through. And hopefully, 
we'll get through the whole plan of or- 
ganization, and then vote on it as a whole. 



But if there are questions as we go along, I 
will try to entertain them. 

The changes in I, Opening Session and 
Organization, have to deal with combin- 
ing the Holy Communion and the 
Memorial Service, which has been done 
and was done in the fashion of yesterday. 
The roll call where you see deletions have 
not reaUy changed anything, except we 
have felt it was not necessary to always 
print in the Daily Christian Advocate all 
the absentees and substitutions as long as 
they are reported to the secretary as is in- 
dicated here. That ought to be enough, so 
we have dropped the requirement that 
they be tabulated and published each day 
in \.he Daily Christian Advocate. Section B 
and Section C are unchanged. 

Under 11, the intent there is to recognize 
the global nature of The United Methodist 
Church, and I've added that in giving the 
quadrennial lay address that they should 
consult with lay leadership of the central 
conferences as well as those within the 
United States. 

III, in Presiding Officers, the deleted 
material has been transferred, and we wEl 
come to that when we come to the Com- 
mittee on Presiding Officers. There will be 
some revision, but we will get to that in a 
moment. 

IV, we dealt with yesterday. 

V, again we recognize the global nature 
of the church and are asking that at least 
one of the members of the Commission on 
General Conference shall be from an an- 
nual conference outside the United States. 
The material at the end in boldface type 
on B has been transferred from the Cour- 
tesies and Privileges Committee. It's not 
new; it's just been placed in a new spot. 
Number C, the Memorial Service has been 
moved, as we already indicated, to the first 
part. 

VI, we have the same number of mem- 
bers on the Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order; however, we had the 
secretary listed as one of the 1 1, so we now 
have worded it so that there will be 10, in- 
cluding membership from each of the 
jurisdictions and from annual conferences 
outside the United States, and that the 
business manager shall be made an ex of- 
ficio member along with the secretary; for 
we have found it important at times to 
have the business manager in on our con- 
versations. The facilities help us deter- 
mine in part the number of committees 
that are possible and other things that arc 
helpful to us. 



116 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 28, 1988 



We come to the committees under Vn. 
Again, interim authority was granted to 
this committee to do this; they are the 
committees and with the responsibilities 
as we have here. The changes under calen- 
dar are primarily one of language; it seems 
to be more appropriate. Correlation and 
Editorial Revision Committee has been 
reduced from 5 to 4 on the basis of evalua- 
tions and the needs that are there. Since 
these people are not members of the 
General Conference, and since some of 
their meetings are not always at the site of 
the General Conference, it seemed ap- 
propriate that we change, instead of 
saying that they would have the travel ex- 
pense and per diem allowance the same as 
delegates, that they be reimbursed for 
their expenses because they are not always 
at the site of the General Conference. 

As we go along, I think again in the 
credentials it's a matter merely of saying 
that we no longer have to report in the 
Daily Christian Advocate, that reporting 
to the secretary of the General Con- 
ference, listing the changes, is adequate 
for ours. The Committee on JoxuTial has 
been reduced to 3, again in light of evalua- 
tions which seem to think this is all that's 
necessary for this task. The presiding of- 
ficers, the amount that.. .the part that's 
been added there replaces what we deleted 
earlier, the matter in which the presiding 
officers shall be selected, again has come 
from evaluation and consultation with the 
previous chairperson of that committee 
and we think it will be effective in select- 
ing the presiding officers. 

The Reference Committee, most of the 
changes there are merely wording; 
however, we would call attention.. .we did 
delete the automatic referral of the Epis- 
copal and Laity Addresses to appropriate 
conmiittees. We have done that for per- 
haps three reasons in our discussion. One 
is that as these addresses are made, they 
become the property of all of you and will 
be influential in your decision making. 
Secondly, it is not always easy to break 
down such addresses for specific legisla- 
tion. Some addresses may have specific 
recommendations in them; they're more 
easily referred than others. So if there are 
occasions when that is true, then the 
General Conference still has the privilege 
of referring them; but to make it 
automatic did not seem to be in the best 
interest. 

Under B on B-9 we have deleted the 
matter of promptly advising the author or 
authors there of its action in order that an 



appeal may be beat to the conference if 
therefore...the conference, if desired. We 
deleted that primarily because of the im- 
possibility of doing that. If somebody 
sends a petition from San Francisco, and 
it is deemed improper after getting here, 
for reference, and we have to make all the 
phone calls for all those, it seems to be an 
impractical matter to follow. And the 
other matter is a matter of a job descrip- 
tion of the secretary, which is automatical- 
ly cared for. We deleted the tellers, and we 
had picked that up in another part as you 
remember. The standing legislative com- 
mittees were all acted upon yesterday. 

That brings us then over to D and E and 
F, in which there are no substantive chan- 
ges except for language. Eight is un- 
changed. Nine is unchanged. Ten is 
merely a matter which we think will 
clarify in the event of being challenged, 
and it has been requested so that the 
process for the book editor and the like 
will be properly handled if such an issue 



The other matters in the 13 reports to 
be mailed before the General Conference, 
I think, are matters that are just matters 
within discipline in keeping. That com- 
pletes the run-through for that portion of 
our reports on plan of organization. And, 
Bishop, I move the adoption of the plan of 
organization. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, those in 
favor of approving adopting this report 
show their hands. All right, keep it up, 
please. We need two-thirds vote here. All 
right, those against? It prevails. Thank 
you. 

FRANK NESTLER: The rules of order 
are basically unchanged as you go 
through. We have perhaps simplified 
under Rule 5 a reserve delegate may be 
seated upon authority of the chairperson 
of the delegation who shall report. 

BISHOP KULAH: Where are you now, 
please? 

NESTLER: I am in the rules of order at 
the top of B-16. It starts at the bottom of 
B-15, Rule 5. We have tried to simplify the 
process some: "A reserve delegate may be 
seated upon authority of the chairperson 
of the delegation who shall report the sub- 
stitution to the Committee on Credentials 
on a form provided for this purpose." And 
again we have said that "the chairperson 
the Committee on Credentials shall make 
a daUy written report to the secretary of 
the General Conference" and that will be 
sufficient without then being printed in 
the Daily Christian Advocate. 



Rule 6, this has been an effort to be prac- 
ticed in the past and we put it in here very 
specifically: "A delegate shall not move to 
the microphone imtil recognized by the 
presiding bishop." 

I think you can move then over to Rule 
29, which is on B-18. There in 29-2 there 
is boldface type that is merely placed here 
because we think it is more appropriate to 
be placed here and has been removed from 
Rule 32. 1 think those are the only items I 
need to call attention to. So now I move 
that the rules of order of this General Con- 
ference be adopted as printed. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right. 
Microphone 3. 

RICHARD LOONEY (Holston): Inquiry 
for clarification on a minority reports. It's 
my assumption that minority report com- 
ing from a legislative committee can simp- 
ly ask for the retention of the present 
wording in the Discipline. In past General 
Conferences there has been some con- 
fusion about that, and I would like a 
clarification on what is a legitimate 
minority report. Depending on the 
answer, I may have a motion. 

NESTLER: I wonder if I could ask Judge 
Bray who is a member of our committee, 
if he is present, to speak on this. He 
presented this to our training conference 
yesterday. Judge Bray are you present? 
He'll go to a microphone here. He's a 
member of the committee and, I think, 
can respond to that. 

JERRY BRAY: I heard the question, but 
I didn't understand it. 

BISHOP KULAH: Repeat your ques- 
tion, please. 

LOONEY: A minority report coming 
from a legislative committee, my assump- 
tion is that if there is a move in commit- 
tee to change the wording of the 
Discipline, the minority report could be 
simply to retain the present wording. But 
in the past there has been some confusion 
about that. Before we go into committee, I 
think it needs to be clarified. 

BRAY: You have to consider what the 
majority report is. You are saying a 
minority report. If there is a majority 
report, the minority report must be a 
proposal that covers the same area 
without being the negative of the proposi- 
tion or in the majority report. In other 
words, you can't come in just with a 
minority report say vote no on the 
proposition that the majority is putting 
forward. You can't have a minority report 
if you don't have a majority report. 



April 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



117 



BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. You understand? It is not a negative 
report but is an approach to what the 
report is saying. 

LOONEY: I'm not sure I understand; I 
hope I do. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. Yes. 

HELEN RHEA COPPEDGE (South 
Georgia): Is it appropriate to move an 
amendment right now on Rule 29? It's 
page B-18, Rule 29-1. I'd like to move that 
it be amended by addition of a very simple 
phrase at the end of that Section 1. 
Change the period to a comma and add 
"unless it is given special instructions by 
the General Conference." If I get a second, 
I'd like to speak to it. 

BISHOP KULAH: Is there a second? All 
right, you may speak now. 

COPPEDGE: It's really a very simple 
thing. I think it simply makes explicit the 
authority of the General Conference to in- 
struct a committee. There might be some 
situations where timing would facilitate 
the overall action of the General Con- 
ference, and it might be that there would 
be some specific instructions that the con- 
ference would wish to give to a committee 
in terms of timing or whatever, and I think 
this just makes the conference's authority 
to do that explicit. 

BISHOP KULAH: Do you accept that? 

NESTLER: I don't see any objection to 
it~whether it needs to be here. What I 
tried to remind the Committee on Calen- 
dar helps determine how things come, and 
that is in the process. I have no objection 
to it. However, I don't know that it adds 
anything to that particular. 

BISHOP KULAH: Any objection? All 
right, there is none. Therefore it is ac- 
cepted. Thank you. 

DANIEL BREWER (Liberia): I'm as- 
king for a motion to reconsider or try to 
get a chair before we took the vote because 
I need clarification of Rule 5 on B-7. 

BISHOP KULAH: As far as I know, the 
whole rule has not been adopted, there- 
fore there is no need for a reconsideration. 
There is no need for a motion. 

BREWER: All right. My concern is the 
equivalent of the jurisdiction conference 
in the United States is the central con- 
ference outside of the United States. And 
I am wondering if it is the intention to 
equate the central conference here with 
the jurisdictional conference rather than 
to read jurisdiction membership from 
each of the jurisdictions and from annual 
conferences outside the United States. 



Should it not be members from each of the 
jurisdictional conferences and from the 
central conferences outside the United 
States instead? 

BISHOP KULAH: What page are you 
on, Dan? 

BREWER: B-5-6, the Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order, Par. A. Pardon 
me, B-7. 

BISHOP KULAH: Please identify them 
more clearly. 

BREWER: B-7A, the first paragraph: 
'There shall be a Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order of ten 
members, including membership from 
each of the Jurisdictions and from Annual 
Conferences outside of the United States." 
And the annual conferences and the 
central conferences outside the United 
States is the equivalent of the jurisdiction- 
al conference in the United States. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, thank you. 
An objection? All right. Do you have some- 
thing else? 

FRANK NESTLER: Well, I'm not sure, 
but this is under VI-A on the plan of or- 
ganization and rules of order: 'There shall 
be a Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order often including mem- 
bership from each of the jurisdictions and 
from annual..." wants to change that to 
central conference, is that right? 

BISHOP KULAH: Central conference? 
The central conference outside of the 
United States is comparable to jurisdic- 
tional conference. 

NESTLER: I'm wUling to accept that 
unless there is any objection. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, very weU, 
is there objection? All right, I am ready for 
the motion for the adoption of the whole 
rule of order. Those in favor show their 
hands; those against? It is revealed by two- 
thirds vote. Thank yoa 

NESTLER: Bishop, may I just say one 
word of appreciation? You have listed on 
B-4 at the end of the introduction the 
members of the committee who have 
served with me, and I appreciate their ef- 
forts. And this is not the easiest of jobs, 
but they have served well; and I want to 
express a word of appreciation. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. Yes, let's give them a hand, please. 
(applause) Yes. 

JOEL MARTINEZ (Rio Grande): 
Yesterday, in the course of the presenta- 
tion of this report, there was a person 
nominated from the floor for secretary of 
the General Conference. I need your 
guidance, Bishop. My interest is that some 



biographical information on that nominee 
be printed in the DCA as early as practi- 
cal. I would so move, unless there's plans 
already to do it. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right. Where's 
the secretary? 

MARTINEZ: WiU there be biographical 
information on Carolyn Marshall printed 
in the DCA? 

FAITH RICHARDSON: If it is so 
directed, it could be. 

MARTINEZ: I so move. 

BISHOP KULAH: Is there a second? 
Yes. 

JEROME DEL PINO (Southern New 
England): My question is, Bishop, if the 
biographical information will be given on 
both nominees. 

BISHOP KULAH: Should be, should be. 
Yes. Number 3, go to the mike please. 

PETER SUN (Baltimore): I was going to 
ask to include both nominees resume. 

BISHOP KULAH: AU right, he's going 
to ask that we include both nominees' 
resxmie. All right, very good. Anything 
else? OK, those in favor of the motion, 
please show their hands. Against? It will 
be printed in the DCA, thank you. All 
right. We are now on the test of voting 
equipment. Let's try it once more. Yester- 
day, we tried it, but let's tiy it once more. 
Yes, back there. Number 12 or 11. 

JEFF GOOD (West Ohio): I was 
wondering is there a problem with the 
equipment that the page numbers is not 
shown on the screen? 

BISHOP KULAH: Yes, that's why he's 
here. All right, thank you, go ahead. 

DEWAYNE WOODRING: I'm sorry; I 
don't know the answer to the question be- 
cause I've been working on the other 
problem from yesterday. But I'U find out 
for you. I was sort of afraid to show up 
today. How many delegates sitting here 
have worked with computers? Would you 
put up your hands? Thank you. How many 
of you have had problems with computers? 
I think there's more of you with problems 
than have worked with them. Those of you 
who raised your hands know our utter 
frustrations of yesterday with the com- 
puter which operates the electronic voting 
system. 

I'm pleased to report that last evening 
the entire voting system was tested. Utiliz- 
ing the 482 voice choir who thought they 
came to sing, each member of the choir 
registered their votes on two key pads, not 
just one but on two. The votes recorded on 
the screen came to 964 just as it should 
have been recorded. We therefore know 



118 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



the system works; however, today there is 
an entire staff that we got out of bed last 
night at 1:00 this morning in New York 
City that are computer programmers, and 
they are working today rechecking the 
system. Therefore, we are postponing 
reactivating the system until we are sure 
all is well. If it isn't, you will not see me 
again. If it is, another day will be here; and 
I will appear again. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. We will have you excused until that 
time. Thank you. We now ask for Dr. John 
Bevan to come and give us the agenda for 
Thursday. 

JOHN BEVAN: Bishop Kulah, mem- 
bers of the conference, at the present time 
Thursday's agenda is very tentative. 
However, tentatively, I underscore, we 
will have, well definitely, we will have 
presentation of the retiring bishops at 
9:00, a report from the Council of Bishops 
on the mission consultation, both to be, 
both the presentation of retiring bishops 
and the report to be made by Bishop Paul 
Duffey. There may be other items that will 
come to the agenda committee this morn- 
ing, but it seems imlikely, so it appears 
that the majority of Thursday will be for 
legislative committee work. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. Yes. Microphone 7. 

BOB WATERS (Texas): Bishop, I 
sought yesterday to introduce an amend- 
ment to the agenda committee's report. It 
seems apparent that the report will be a 
day by day affair, and in behalf of the 
Texas Conference delegation, we should 
like to establish an order of the day for 
next Monday. Therefore I should like to 
offer the following resolution as an 
amendment to the report of the agenda 
committee. Resolved, that all petitions 
and proposals concerned with the lan- 
guage of the Discipline and the Social 
Creed regarding homosexuality and the 
ordination and appointment of self- 
avowed practicing homosexuals shall be 
made the order of the day for Monday, 
May 2nd, at 10:30 a.m, with all debate and 
voting on those issues to be completed by 
noon of that session. 

BISHOP KULAH: Is there a second? 
The second is before us. 

WATERS: May I speak to that motion? 

BISHOP KULAH: You may very well. 

WATERS: Our delegation has debated 
this concern. We feel that the larger 
majority of the people who now sit in this 
assembly, came predisposed in mind as to 
how they will vote on the language of the 



Social Creed and the Discipline regarding 
homosexuality and the appointment and 
organization of homosexuals. Secondly, 
we feel that to continue a debate on this 
issue, which has been before the General 
Conference many times, longer than an 
hour and a half is to dissipate energies that 
need to be spent in many other crucial 
concerns by people already xmder the 
duress of limited time. We ask the ap- 
proval of this amendment. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you. Yes. 
Microphone 12. 

JOHN STUMBO (Kansas East): I think 
I can support the proposed amendment 
except for one provision, and that is plac- 
ing a final conclusion time on the proposal 
it seems to me prematurely limits the 
ability to amend and substitute and debate 
the issue. We have limitations on the num- 
ber of debates and the length of the 
debate, and so I can support the idea of an 
agenda item for the day, but I oppose any 
limitation that we must conclude it by 
noon on that day. 

BISHOP KULAH: AU right. Do you 
want to speak to that. Go ahead, number 
3,2. 

CHARLES DUNDAS (Minnesota): 
Bishop, I would move to delete the time 
limitation for debate. 

BISHOP KULAH: Is there a second? All 
right. Anybody want to speak to it? 

DUNDAS: Yes. I would choose to speak 
against it. Bishop. The motion tends to 
limit... 

WATERS: Point of order. May I speak 
since I made the motion? I simply agree 
with Mr. Stumbo, that we should not place 
the limitation on the debate and the op- 
portimity to amend and discuss this issue. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, the amend- 
ment is before us: that we accept the 
amendment except the timing, the time 
factor. Are you ready to vote? Those in 
favor show their hands. All right. We are 
on the amendment to the amendment. Do 
you understand? Question? Yes. 

RHETT JACKSON (South Carolina): If 
we pass the original motion with the time 
limitation, will the conference on Monday 
have an option to continue the time in 
some way, if we pass the motion in that 
manner. Can we suspend the rules at that 
time, and extend the time? 

BISHOP KULAH: Yes, that's the right 
procedure. The amendment is here before 
us to delete the time factor for the amend- 
ment. Those who are in favor, show their 
hands. Those against. It loses; we need to 
have two-thirds vote. Yes. 



BILL MCCARTNEY (East Ohio): Are 
we back on the main amendment? 

BISHOP KULAH: We are on the main 
amendment, yes. 

MCCARTNEY: I would like to speak 
against it on the basis of the philosophy of 
it. We have established clear rules of the 
way that the deliberation of this body 
should go. Providing for committees that 
shall oversee the conduct of legislation 
bringing them to the plenary session in or- 
derly fashion. I think that it is a dangerous 
precedent for us to take legislation, no 
matter how important, no matter how ex- 
plosive it has been, and have the plenaiy 
session take away the responsibility from 
those agenda committees and act in this 
fashion. Additionally, it presumes that the 
legislative committees will have finished 
their action, when in fact they may still be 
deliberating very carefully on the sub- 
stance of this very important issue. 

BISHOP KULAH: AU right. That's a 
motion that speaks against the motion. Is 
anybody for? Are you for? All right, 
microphone 12. 

MCCARTNEY: Sir, were you asking me 
was I for or against? Somebody told me 
you were asking me if I was for or against? 

BISHOP KULAH: (inaudible) your 
speech betray you, sir. Your speech dear- 
ly indicated that you... 

MCCARTNEY: I thought so. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you. Yes. 

DICK TRUITT (Wisconsin): Bishop, 
the question is did you rule that the mo- 
tion was defeated because of a two-thirds 
rule? 

BISHOP KULAH: All right, that was a 
mistake. Yes. 

TRUITT: The rule to end debate, as I 
understand the rules, does require two- 
thirds vote. An amendment to the motion 
does not need more than a simple 
mjoority. Therefore, it seems to me that 
the amendment was already supported. 

BISHOP KULAH: No, sir, according to 
what I said, it was not supported. And 
when I said two-thirds, it was a clear mis- 
take of the chair and I'll have it corrected 
right away. Thank you. Yes. Is that a 
speech for? 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: It is a 
speech for. 

BISHOP KULAH: We need a speech for 
now. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: You need 
a speech for? 

BISHOP KULAH: Yes. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: This is 
against. 



AprU 28, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



119 



BISHOP KULAH: A speech against, all 
right. Is there a speech for? All right, 3. 

LEROY MOORE aowa): A legislative 
body always has control of its own time. 
This is not a dangerous precedent. We can 
decide whether we want to debate some- 
thing at great length or at short length, 
and I would urge the body to support this 
motion. 

BISHOP KULAH: Anyone against? OK 

J. PHILIP WOGAMAN (Baltimore): 
Are we on the main motion? 

BISHOP KULAH: Yes, we are on the 
main motion. 

WOGAMAN: I stand opposed to this be- 
cause this motion is based on the assump- 
tion that we have already made up our 
minds on one of the most explosive and 
divisive issues facing the church. It is ex- 
actly that kind of issue we should be 
deliberative about and not assume that we 
have come to the place of the General Con- 
ference with our minds already made up. 
There needs to be room in this body for 
careful deliberation and thought on issues 
of this kind. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. At this time we ask, anyone 
against? For? Are you for? OK, go ahead, 
6. 

JOE PEVAHOUSE (Memphis): Since 
this issue became up on the agenda of the 
pre-conference agenda, it has dominated 
all the other agenda items. It would seem 
to me that it's important we go on and 
move on this item and discuss it and get it 
decided so that we can move on to the 
other important items that are coming 
before the conference, number one. And 
number two, before us it is a volatile issue. 
It's an emotional issue, and let's get on 
with it and vote on it early, so that we 
won't have to be pressed for time and get 
involved in that kind of thing. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. We have 3 for and 3 against. We 
now ask the motion to be repeated so that 
we'll go ahead and take the vote. 
Secretary, go ahead 

RICHARDSON: Resolve that all peti- 
tions and proposals concerned with the 
language of the Discipline and the Social 
Creed regarding homosexuality and the 
ordination and appointment of self- 
avowed, practicing homosexuals shall be 
made the order of the day for Monday, 
May 2nd, at 10:30 a.m. with all debate and 
voting on these issues to be completed by 
noon of that session. 

BISHOP KULAH: Are you ready for the 
motion? Those in favor of this motion. 



please stand. All right, please sit, point of 
order. What's your point of order? 15. (in- 
audible) The answer is no, thank you. Do 
you understand the motion before us? All 
right, those who are in favor of this mo- 
tion, I will ask you to stand. All right, 
please sit. Those against, please stand. All 
right, from where I sit, the motion carries. 
Thank you very much. Yes. 

P. BOYD MATHER (Iowa): I believe by 
Rule 25 it does in fact require a two-thirds 
vote. In order to set a special order of the 
day, ahead of time, it requires two-thirds 
vote, according to Rule 25. 

BISHOP KULAH: Rule 25, what page is 
that? B-1. Cinaudible) Thank you for 
bringing that to our attention. We hope 
and pray that you will bring this kind of 
thing to the attention of presiding order 
before the vote is taken, when the chair 
has declared. It is not good to always come 
up with something that the chair has al- 
ready cleared on. (inaudible) Good, he is 
correct, so we will vote again, and we will 
have two-thirds vote. We will make sure 
that we have two-thirds vote. What is the 
point of order? 

JOE BULLINGTON (Alabama-West 
Florida): As I read Rule 25, it says that it 
takes a two-thirds majority to consider a 
special order before the time set therefore. 
The time, as I understand, has not been 
set, and the body is simply setting the time 
at which we will consider this item. It does 
not call for a special order of the day to re- 
quire a two-thirds vote. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you. He is 
correct. And, therefore, the ruling of the 
chair stands. Thank you. (applcuise) Yes, 
back there. 

DICK TRUITT (Wisconsin): Bishop, 
the rule to limit debate does require two- 
thirds vote. If you look on p. B-21, it sug- 
gests: limit debate. The last column says 
vote needed: two-thirds needed. Two- 
thirds majority would be needed to limit 
debate. That motion limited debate. It set 
a limitation on debate. Therefore, unless 
there was a clear two-thirds vote support- 
ing the motion, it has to be declared a 
failed motion. 

BISHOP KULAH: You are my brother, 
you are out of order. This motion does not 
limit debate. It is to set the order of the 
day for next Monday, and therefore you 
are out of order. Thank you. All right, (in- 
audible) at this time I will call on.. .point of 
order.. .number 10. 

ARTHUR F. HAGY JR. (Troy Con- 
ference): I would like to challenge the 



chair's decision that motion does not limit 
debate. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right. You're ap- 
pealing to the house. 

HAGY: That's correct. 

BISHOP KULAH: All right. In this case, 
I have the right to make a statement, and 
that statement is that the motion before 
us was a motion to set an order of the day 
for next Monday. It was not to limit any 
debate. Thank you. 

JOHN E. STUMBO (Kansas East): 
Bishop, my concern is that the 12:00 com- 
pletion part of the motion has the effect of 
limiting debate. The setting of the agenda 
time as a special order of the day does not, 
and I think the chair is correct. The part 
of the motion, however, which attempts to 
limit.. .to conclude the matter by 12:00 sys- 
temically limits the possibility of debate 
and therefore requires two-thirds 
majority. 

BISHOP KULAH: (inaudible) All right. 
In a case where somebody appealed to the 
house who (inaudible) to see whether he 
sustained the declaration of the chair and 
we need a m^ority vote. All right. It is now 
before us. Those who have sustained the 
declaration of the chair, please show their 
hands. Thank you. Those against? All 
right. Let's count... Let's have a coimt. You 
don't want to do that? You want to take a 
chance with the chair? (applause and 
laughter) All right, all right. Again, let's 
stand. Those who agree with the declara- 
tion of the chair, please stand. Thank you 
very much. Please sit. Those against? It 
doesn't cany. All right. I'm afraid to say 
that the chair has lost. Thank you. (in- 
audible) All right. Number 2. 

MAXIE DUNNAM (Memphis): I voted 
for the motion. And I move to reconsider 
and that we consider the two separate is- 
sues in the motion separately.. .that we 
vote on making it the order of the day and 
then that we vote on the time schedule 
separately. 

BISHOP KULAH: Is there a second? All 
right. Do you want to speak? All right. 
Those in favor, show their hands. 
Against? All right. He has been separated. 
Cinaudible) is the order of the day. All 
right, those in favor of studying it on Mon- 
day as the order of the day please show 
their hands. Those against? Majority car- 
ries. All right. The time factor, those in 
favor of ..do you want to speak.. .the time, 
please show their hands. All right. This 
time we need two-thirds vote. Those 
against? It does not prevail. Anything 



120 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 28, 1988 



else? (inaudible) All right. Number 3, 



KATHRYN MOORE (Iowa Con- 
ference): I would ask if the house might 
refrain from clapping afler votes are taken 
because we are not here to win or lose. We 
are here to discern what God's will is for 
the church. 

BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. Now, I want to remind you that the 
order of the day calls for adjournment and 



we're past the time. So therefore, before 
we at^ourn, I want to call on Bishop Prince 
A. Taylor. All right, presiding officer 
report. Sorry. 

JAMES M. WALKER (Southwest 
Texas): Bishop Kulah, the Committee on 
Presiding Officers is pleased to announce 
that our presiding officer in the morning 
session.. .tomorrow morning's ses- 
sion...will be Bishop Edsel A. Ammons of 
West Ohio. 



BISHOP KULAH: Thank you very 
much. All right. It is good for me to clap 
for him. At this time, I'm going to call on 
Bishop Prince A. Taylor, the man who 
hugged me in the ministry, to come and 
give the closing prayer. Bishop Taylor. 

(prayer) 

BISHOP KULAH: Amen. We stand ad- 
journed. 



Daily Report 

Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



voi.vn 



St. Louis, Missouri, Friday, April 29, 1988 



No. 4 




Legislative committee work occupies most of early days. Church and society, one of 1 1 legisla- 
tive groups, discusses a proposal. (John Goodwin Photo) 



International Participants Demonstrate Global Reach of Wesleyanism 

From Argentina to Singapore, the 
global reach of the Wesleyan movement 
came alive Thursday. 

Leaders of more than a dozen 
autonomous Methodist bodies affiliated 
with The United Methodist Church were 
introduced at the morning session. Ar- 
gentina, Bolivia, Brazil, the Caribbean, 
Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, England, 
Indonesia and Singapore were among 
the lands represented by the visitors. 
"We know they have graced us with their 
wisdom and their understanding," said 
the Rev. Cliflon Ives, Portland, Me., in 
making the presentation. 

Honors accorded two key leaders in the 
1988 General Conference during a World 
Methodist Council luncheon accented 
the morning presentations. 

Frances Alguire, Downers Grove, 111., 
who chairs the Commission on the 
General Conference, and Bishop Earl G. 
Hunt Jr., Lakeland, Fla, preacher at the 
conference's opening eucharistic 
celebration, were presented the WMC 

Agenda 

Thursday, April 28 
9:00 a.m. Presentation of 
Retiring Bishops 
9:15 a.m. Courtesies 
9:20 a.m. Demonstration of 
Voting Equipment 
9:25 a.m. Calendar Items 

Central Conferences 
11:00 a.m. Agenda Report 

Presiding Bishop Report 
Aj^oum to Legislative Sessions 
12:30 p.m. Lunch 
2:30-5:00 p.m. Legislative 

Committees 
7:30 p.m. Legislative 
Committees 



"Seat of Honor" for work in behalf of 
World Methodism. Mrs. Alguire is presi- 
dent of the WMC's North American Sec- 
tion, and Bishop Hunt is past president. 

Most of Thursday again was spent in 
legislative committees perfecting calen- 
dar items to come before the delegates 
later in the session. 

Typically, delegates in the committee 
on Independent Commissions and Judi- 
cial Administration endorsed participa- 
tion in "An Ecumenical Decade: Chur- 
ches in Solidarity with Women." They 
also supported the covenanting proposal 
coming out of the Consultation on 
Church Union. 

In the Local Church committee, ap- 
proval was voted for removal of discipli- 
nary language making the pastor the 
mandatory chair of a congregation's 
committee on nominations and person- 
nel. Committee members opposed dele- 
tion of a requirement that one-third of 
local church trustees be women. 

The Global Ministries committee con- 
curred with a proposal to change the ter- 
minology so that "home missionaries" 
will be referred to as "missionaries." 

No legislative committee decision is 
final until it has been acted upon by the 
delegates in plenary session. 

In one item of plenary business 
Thursday, the conference agreed to 
devote 20 minutes Saturday morning to 



a report from the committee monitoring 
the 1985-88 quadrennium's emphasis on 
developing and strengthening ethnic 
minority congregations. 

The delegates also heard a report from 
Bishop Paul A. Duffey, Louisville, Ky., on 
the past four-year's dialogue between the 
Board of Global MinistriesfBGM) and 
what the 1984 General Conference 
called "persons who had concerns about 
the emphasis of the board on evangelism 
and Wesleyan theology." 

Bishop Duffey said that the Mission 
Society for United Methodists was in- 
vited to represent the latter group, and 
that 11 sessions had been held between 
representatives of BGM, the society and 
the Council of Bishops. The report con- 
cluded that "after all the discussions we 
have not been able to resolve all the mat- 
ters before us." 

A recommendation by the bishops that 
the dialogue be discontinued, and that 
the Board of Global Ministries be reaf- 
firmed "as the only authorized sending 
agency of the United Methodist 
Church..." will come before the con- 
ference later in the session. 

Bishop Ernest T. Dixon Jr., San An- 
tonio, Texas, was installed as president 
of the Council of Bishops Thursday. He 
will serve a one-year term succeeding 
Bishop Hunt. 
-Robert Lear 



122 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 29, 1988 



Conference Worship Leaders 
from Kentucky, Oklahoma 

Leading worship today for the General 
Conference delegates and visitors will be 
Bishop Paul A. Duffey and the Rev. 
Thomas Roughface. Bishop Duffey will 
preach at 8:30 a.m. in Cervantes Conven- 
tion Center. Mr. Roughface's sermon will 
come during a 2:30 p.m. service at St. 
Patrick's Catholic Church. 

Superintendent of the Montgomery 
district of the-Alabama-West Florida An- 
nual Conference when elected to the 
episcopacy in 1980, Bishop Duffey has 
been assigned to the Louisville Area for 
eight years. 

He joined the Tennessee Conference 
while still a divinity student at Vander- 
bilt University. Between 1946 and 1976, 
he served six different churches in the 
Alabama-West Florida Conference. He 
serves on the coordinating and program 
councils of the General Council on Mini- 
stries, on the General Conference Com- 
mission to Study the Ministry and on the 
Judicial Council. He has also been 
secretaiy of the CouncO of Bishops. 

Liturgists for this morning's service 
will be Phyllis Hail and George C. Woods. 
Ms. Hail, a member of the Kentucky 
delegation, is an associate director of the 
annual conference council on ministries. 
A Louisville conference delegate, Woods 
is a social worker in Louisville, Ky. 

Mr. Roughface is director of the Coun- 
cil on Higher Education and Ministiy for 
the Oklahoma Indian Missionary Con- 
ference (OIMC). He is a member of the 
Ponca tribe. 

Since 1972, he has been the only OIMC 
clergy delegate to the General and South 




The Albricias Ensemble of Southern California will be participating in today's worship. The choir 
represents a large number of Hispanic churches in the greater Los Angeles area, and is com- 
posed of volunteers whose ethnic backgrounds cover the rainbow of Latin American cultures. 
The director, Raquel Achon, was born in Cuba of Puerto Rican parents. Ms. Achon was project 
director of the United Methodist "Celebremos" hymnal supplement, and has served as consult- 
ant for the Hispanic hymnals of several other denominations. 



Central Jurisdictional conferences. A 
member of the denominational Mis- 
sional Priority Coordinating Committee, 
on weekends Mr. Roughface is part-time 
pastor to the Pawnee tribal commimity 
in Pawnee, Okla. 

Liturgist for this afternoon's service 
will be Eleanor Richardson. A member 
of the North Georgia delegation to the 
1988 Annual Conference, Ms. 
Richardson serves in the Georgia legis- 
lature. 



Names of the liturgists for the morn- 
ing worship services were not included 
in earlier listings of the schedule. 



Eileen Gray, liturgist on Wednesday, 
April 27, is a church secretaiy serving as 
a member of the Western Pennsylvania 
delegation. Liturgist on Thursday, April 
28, Yolanda Pupo-Ortiz is associate 
general secretaiy for the General Com- 
mission on Religion and Race. 

Liturgists named for the other morn- 
ing services include: 

Saturday, April 30: Bishop Thomas S. 
Bangura; 

Wednesday, May 4: Thomas Rough- 
face; 

Thursday, May 5: Pat CaUbeck Harper 
and Connie Takamine; 

Friday, May 6: Donna Herbert and 
Keith Wise. 



.NL C 




■^r LOU\'' 



Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference of 
the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 

published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist Publishing 
House, P.O. Box 801, Nashville, TN 
37202. 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
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Calendar & Proceedings 

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Barbara Dunlap-Berg Assistant Copy Editor 

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Mochell Anderson Secretary 



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Subscriptions: Daily Reports (binder included) 
$34.60 if picked up at the DCA booth (final issues 
mailed Ist class); $57.50 mailed daily from St. Louis 
by Ist class mail; $46.00 mailed a(Ur General Con- 
ference. Individual copies $3.00 each at DCA booth. 
Roundup Edition (one copy included in Daily 

$1 each; Single copies, $2 each. Sets mailed after 
Conference: Advance Editions Workbook, $17.50; 
Bound Volume*: Advance Editions Workbook and 
Daily Reports, $126 a set (mailed in August). 



April 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



123 



Announcements 

The Local Entertainment Committee 
requests that all materials be removed 
from the delegate tables on Saturday 
before leaving the last session since 
visitors will be sitting at the tables during 
the Sunday afternoon performance of 
the Missouri Area Event "Through 
Church Windows." 

All clergywomen delegates are asked to 
be present for a group photo Friday at 2 
p.m. at the Women's Center, 3rd floor, 
Sheraton Hotel. 

Briefing session on "new Scarritt" 
Tuesday noon. May 3 at 1:15 p.m. in Con- 
vention Center. Room to be announced. 
All friends, graduates and interested per- 
sons invited for an informal information 
presentation on the "new Scarritt." 

There will be a meeting of the Kansas 
Area delegations on Sunday, May 1, from 
1:00-6:00 p.m. in room 270 of the Con- 
vention Center. 

All native Black South Carolina per- 
sons please meet J. F. Norwood at the 
area near room 127 at 11:45 a.m. today. 

Delegates and friends of the New Jer- 
sey Area (Northern & Southern New Jer- 
sey conferences) will meet Wednesday, 
May 4 at 12:45 p.m. for a luncheon at the 
Radisson Hotel, room Admiral B. Paid 
reservations' must be made to the chair 
of each delegation by Monday noon. May 
2. The honored guest will be Bishop Neil 
L. Irons. 

The Louisville Area breakfast with 
Bishop and Mrs. Duffey will be held on 
Tuesday, May 3, 7 a.m. at the Sheraton 
Hotel in the Grant Room. Reservations 



may be made with J. D. Dixon or Harold 
Hunter. Deadline, Sunday, May 1. 

The Women District superintendents 
are having lunch together on Monday, 
May 2 at Hannegan's on Second Street 
at Laclede's Landing. All past, present, 
and newly appointed women superinten- 
dents are cordially invited to attend. For 
more information, contact Carolina B. 
Edge at the Sheraton. 

The San Antonio Area Delegation 
(Southwest Texas/Rio Grande Con- 
ferences) will gather in a dinner honor- 
ing Bishop & Mrs. Ernest T. Dixon, Jr. 
on Wednesday, May 4 at 5:30 p.m., Eads 
Room, Sheraton Hotel. Members of the 
delegation and visitors desiring to attend 
must make reservations by Monday 
noon. See Dr. Prenza Woods. 

The California-Pacific Conference din- 
ner-gathering will be held at St. Patrick's 
Church, 7th and Delmar (across from 
Sheraton Hotel), 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, 
May 5. Bishop and Mrs. Jack Tuell will 
be honored. Member and friends of the 
conference are welcome, $7. Reserva- 
tions due on May 2. Send by page to Sec- 
tion A, Seat 10, Row 4. 
*•• 

The Philadelphia Area (Eastern Pen- 
nsylvania and Puerto Rico) delegates, 
reserves and guests will meet for dinner 
at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4 at the 
Riverfront Holiday Inn. Honored guests 
will be Bishop and Mrs. F. Herbert 
Skeete. 

The Indiana Area luncheon to honor 
past and present bishops and friends will 
be held at noon or upon completion of 
the plenary on Tuesday, May 3 in Room 
270 of the Convention Center. Paid 
reservations are required. See John Set- 



Directions For Electronic Voting 


1. The presiding officer will state: 


will be recorded before or after that 
countdown. 


"Please vote when numbers 
appear on the screen." 

2. Vote anytime during the 
coimtdown from 9 through 1. 


5. It is possible to change your vote 
anytime during the countdown. The 
computer will always accept the last 
number pressed. 

6. When the countdown reaches 


3. Press button 1 for yes 


zero, the voting is closed and a graph 
appears on the screen indicating the 
resvdts of the vote. 


Press button 2 for no 




Press button 3 for abstention. 




4. Votes are recorded only during 
the numerical countdown. No votes 





tie or David White of the North and 
South Indiana conferences. 
•*• 

The Methodist Peace Fellowship, in 
cooperation with the United Methodist 
Office for the United Nations, invites 
you to hear Ronald Young, executive 
director of the U.S. Interreligious Com- 
mittee for Peace in the Middle East, 
speak on "A Time for Peace in the Mid- 
dle East." Christ in the City Church, 9th 
and Biddle, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Saturday, 
April 30. A light supper will be available 
for $6. Make reservations with Herman 
Will, Mia A^jali, or Jessma Blockwick or 
at the MFSA office. Room 610, 
Riverfront Days Inn. 

A limited number of spaces are still 
available for the chartering dinner for 
the Missouri East Chapter of The 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
5:45 p.m., Sat., April 30, Centenary 
UMC, 16th & Pine. Cost is $7. Contact 
Mark Harvey, Room 610, Days Inn 
Hotel, phone: 621-7900, ext. 7610. 

Briefing session on "Towards 
Economic Justice," Friday, April 29, 1 
p.m. -2 p.m., Rm. 270, Convention 
Center, speaker: Dr. Teresa Amott, 
professor of economics, University of 
Massachusetts, Boston. 
••• 

Reception honoring women delegates 
sponsored by the Women's Division, 
General Board of Global Ministries, 
Sunday, May 1, 3-5 p.m. Sheraton 
Hotel, Ballroom West. Drama at 3 p.m., 
"Samantha Rastles the Woman Ques- 
tion," celebrating the 100th Anniversary 
of the election of the first women 
delegates to the 1888 General Con- 
ference. 



Additional Petitions 

2664-GA-1007-D Advance Commit- 
tee. GCOM. 

2663-FA-715-D Conference 

Treasurer. Charles Dailey, EOH. 

2662-CC-636-D Proposed New 
(Central Africa Conference Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs 



Episcopal and Lay 

Addresses Available 

on Audiotape. 

Orcjer at Booth 

outside UM Publishing 

House Display. 



124 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 29, 1988 



Addition to Petition 
1017-l\/IN-3000-R 

Epilogue 

A basic truth which has motivated the 
work of this commission is that all living 
things change. Some change is construc- 
tive. Some is not. Our deepest searching 
has been to discover what we believe to 
be worthy of preservation for ministry 
and what should be modified. Our com- 
mitment has been to do all in our power 
to enable our church to respond faithful- 
ly to our living Lord. 

Change for the sake of change is an ex- 
ercise in futility and a waste of our valu- 
able resources. To be unmindful of cir- 
cumstances which call for new ways of 
responding to God's call to be a pilgrim 
people is at best, stiff-necked and at 
worst heretical. 

It has not been easy for this commis- 
sion to discern which elements in our 



(Ministry Study Report) 



theology, tradition and structure clearly 
need to be preserved and which should 
be changed. The fact that assignments to 
study the ministry were made by the 
General Conferences of 1964, 1968, 
1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 gives 
credence to the fact that our concepts of 
and structures for the enablement of 
ministry are dynamic Some would view 
this phenomenon as a sure sign of in- 
decisiveness. We believe it is a sign of our 
openness to the leading of Grod to ven- 
ture into new and imtried ways. This is 
a familiar biblical theme. 

From the days of Wesley, we have had 
a deep commitment to understand Scrip- 
ture, and to apply the truths of Scripture 
to current situations. It is easier to specu- 
late about the thunder of God in Scrip- 
ture than it is to respond faithfully to the 
whisper of God in places where direction 
and outcome are uncertain. In our work, 
we have been faithful to both the biblical 



foundations of ministry and the views of 
our forebears in the faith. 

We are certain the assignment given to 
this commission by the 1984 General 
Conference has not been completed. In 
one sense, we wish it had been possible 
to bring to this General Conference a 
report which had a greater finality than 
this in-process report. In another sense, 
our struggle to fmd the better way will 
always be in process. If and when we fmd 
it, we are certain even it will never be the 
final way. 

Such is the nature of a living church. 



Ed. Note: Because a paragraph from the 
epiloguewas dropped from theApril28th 
edition, we are reprinting the entire 
section . 



Adjustments to Lists of Tellers 

(Advance DCA, Pages A-14 and A-15) 



Petitions Re-referred by the Committee 
on Reference 



The following adjustments in the previously printed lists of 
tellers have been made necessary by absences, resignations, or 
the election of tellers as officers of standing administrative or 
legislative committies: 

Group I 

Sec A, Rows 12-15, Ressie Mae Bass (Florida) replaces Ruth 
A. Harlow (Troy) 

Sea A, Rows 19-21, Judy Benson (Oklahoma) replaces Helen 
F. Taylor (Oklahoma) 

Sec. B, Rows 10-12, G. Hubert Neth (Missouri West) replaces 
Mollie Stewart (North Alabama) 

Sec. C, Reserve Section Captain, Betty M. Alexander (Ten- 
nessee) replaces Carolyn M. Marshall (South Indiana) 

Sec D, Row 15-17, Carl C. Ling (West Ohio) replaces Thel- 
ma Johnson (West Ohio) 

Group n 

Sec A, Rows 5-8, Patti Coots (California-Pacific) replaces 
Sheldon Duecker (North Indiana). 

Sec C, Rows 9-11, Charles W. Williams (Texas) replaces 
Winona Bollinger (C. Illinois) 

Sec. D, Section Captain, Margaret R. Saunders (North 
Carolina) replaces James S. Gadsden (South Carolina) 

Sec D, Reserve Section Captain, Sara S. Fugler (Louisiana) 
replaces Deanna Af. Bleyle (Rocky Mountain) 



Old Petition Number 

279-FA-3000-M 

436-CS-3000-S$ 

490-MN-3000-R 

491-FM-3000-R 

946-DI-3000-R 

1388-DI-3000-R 

1631-MN-304-D 

1748-FM-3000-R 

2436-FM-3000-4 $ 

2437-FM-3000-R 

2276-DI-3000-S $ 



Correction 



New Petition Number 

279-GA-3000-M 

436-IJ-3000-S $ 

490-IJ-3000-R 

491-DI-3000-R 

946-CO-3000-R 

1388-MN-3000-R 

1631-MN-402-D 

1748-DI-3000-R 

2436-DI-3000-R $ 

2437-DI-3000-R 

2276-GA-3000-S $ 



Advance Edition F, p. 39 

World Program division Report, Asia/Pacific sub-paragraph. 
The Methodist Chm-ch in Korea hopes to double membership 
from one million to two million by the year 2000, not 500,000 to 
one million. 



April 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



125 



Legislative Committees at Work 

The following brief reports are compiled by the staffs of United 
Methodist Communications and the Daily Christian Advocate. 
They do not represent official reports of the committees. 



Conferences 

•Concurred with a petition to estab- 
lish an Ethnic Minority Local Church 
(EMLC) Concerns Committee in the an- 
nual conference to assist all boards and 
agencies in implementing the con- 
ference comprehensive plan to 
mainstream EMLC; 

♦Concurred with petition to subject to 
episcopal and cabinet review any clergy 
who fail to submit total compensation 
figures for publication in conference 
journal; 

•Concurred with petition to add 
evaluation of conference program to 
responsibilities of conference Council 
on Ministries; 

•Nonconcurred with petition to make 
three quadrennia the norm for episcopal 
tenure in an area; 

•Nonconcurred with petition to forbid 
general agencies from submitting peti- 
tions to General Conference; 

•Nonconcurred with petitions to 
grant annual conference voting rights to 
part-time local pastors; 

•Nonconcurred on a petition to 
schedule jurisdictional conferences just 
prior to General Conference at the 
General Conference site; 

•Non-concurred with a petition to 
elect bishops by plurality vote on one 
ballot; 

•Nonconcurred with a petition to 
create a general church committee on 
the episcopacy to assign bishops and 
deal with other matters related to the 
episcopacy; 

•Nonconcurred with a petition to 
reduce the maximum size of the General 
Conference delegation from 1000 to 750. 

-Ann Whiting and Darrell Shamblin 

Discipleship 

•Recommended to the plenary for ap- 
proval: 

-the Word and Table, Christian Mar- 
riage and Baptism sections of the report 
of the Hymnal Revision Committee 
(HRC) with the substitution of a tradi- 
tional version of the adult baptism ser- 
vice for the recommended Covenant HI; 

"the hymns portion of the HRC 
Report-including the prayers and read- 
ings-with the substitution of "Lord of 
the Dance" from the Supplement to 
the Book of Hymns for "Awake, O 
Sleeper" (p. 723 of the HRC Report); 



-the Liturgical Psalter portion of the 
HRC Report with the substitution of the 
language of the New Revised Stan- 
dard Version of the Bible for 18 

psalms (the New RSV does not use as ex- 
tensive replacement of masculine 
pronouns for the Deity). 
-Paul Ruark and Garlinda Burton 

Faith and Mission 

--Continued a paragraph-by- 
paragraph review of the report of the 
commission on the Doctrinal Standards 
and "Our Theological Task;" 

"Were encouraged to include par- 
ticipation of all members of the commit- 
tee, especially lay delegates and persons 
from outside the United States; 

-Inserted wording from the present 
statement of "Our Theological Task" to 
amend the report to affirm commitment 
"to the principles of religious toleration 
and theological diversity;" 

-Affirmed there are doctrinal stand- 
ards of the church in the context of 
which "we affirm a role for theological 
diversity based on the presupposition of 
the difference between doctrine and 
theology;" 

-Affij-med that Wesley's Sermons 
and Notes have been specifically under- 
stood to be included in the standards of 
doctrine protected by the First Restric- 
tive Rule; 

—Established, without discussion, 
parallel heads from the text using all 
parts of the quadrilateral, deleted the 
words "primacy of before Scripture and 
affirmed all four as resources that are 
"interdependently positively encourag- 
ing" of variety in United Methodist 
theological conversations. 

-Dana Jones and Richard Thomburg 

Financial Administration 

•Recommended to the plenary retain- 
ing the current disciplinary paragraph 
ensuring that United Methodist fimds 
not be given to any "gay" caucus or group 
or be used to promote the acceptance of 
homosexuality; 

•Recommended to the plenary defeat- 
ing a number of petitions to amend that 
paragraph (many referred to the fimd- 
ing of educational programs or 
materials). 

-Linda Bloom and Clyde Chestnut 



Global Ministries 

•Concurred with several amendments 
from the Board of Global Ministries 
(BGM) regarding the administration of 
deaconesses and home missionaries; 

•Concurred with a proposal to change 
terminology so "home missionaries" are 
referred to as "missionaries;" 

•Concurred with a recommendation 
to increase the number of church and 
community workers; 

•Concurred with changing the term 
"congregational redevelopment" to "con- 
gregational renewal and revitalization." 

-Betty Thompson and Charles Cole 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

•Recommended to the plenary for ap- 
proval: 

-the $100 million scholarship endow- 
ment fund; 

-a change in the method of electing 
Wesley Foundation board members; 

-amending the Peace Colleges resolu- 
tion with a substitution to prevent com- 
promising academic freedom and the 
financial aids office; 

-a substitution to provide educational 
support for conscientious objectors to 
registration and the draft; 

-granting provisional endorsement 
for persons moving toward full chaplain- 
cy endorsement in institutions not re- 
lated to an annual conference; 

-electing at least one woman to each 
of the five electing bodies of the Univer- 
sity Senate; 

--adding the associate general 
secretary of diaconal ministry as an ex 
officio representative to the University 
Senate; 

-establishing requirements for in- 
stitutions of higher education choosing 
to disaffiliate with the United Methodist 
Church. 

•Recommended to the plenary for 
rejection: 

-certification of seminary courses by 
the Board of Higher Education and Min- 
istry (BHEM); 

•Voted concurrence: 

-that BHEM should provide resources 
to world churches with aWesleyan tradi- 
tion 

-with an amended petition on current 
UMC programs being taught in United 
Methodist seminaries; 



126 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 29, 1988 



—an amended petition seeking a 
geographically-dispersed method for 
delivery of diaconal ministry foundation 
courses; 

-with a petition to address needs of 
seminary students who will be serving in 
town and country appointments; 

•Voted non-concurrence: 

-to combining the Black College Fund 
and the Ministerial Education Fund into 
the General Education Fund; 

-with a petition asking for higher ethi- 
cal standards for athletes at United 
Methodist-related colleges and univer- 
sities; 

-with a petition asking the General 
Conference to participate in a lawsuit 
concerning collective bargaining at two 
United Methodist-related institutions of 
higher education; 

-with a request that theological in- 
clusiveness be included in the evaluation 
of theological schools. 

•Referred a petition concerning sup- 
port of Hawaii Loa College to BHEM; 

•Referred a substitution for a petition 
concerning a study commission on 
theological education models and minis- 
try patterns to BHEM, Commission on 
Religion and Race, the University Senate 
and the Association of United Methodist 
Theological Schools; 

•Referred a petition concerning 
schools of theology to BHEM to reword 
to include world cultures rather than just 
USA ethnic minorities. 

-Lester Moore and John Borchert 

Independent Commissions and 
Judicial Administration 

•Recommended to the plenary: 

-endorsement of the Commission on 
Pan-American Cooperation; 

-the "Act of Covenanting between 
other Christian Churches and The 
United Methodist Church;" 

-adding racial harassment and sexual 
harassment to the list of chargeable of- 
fenses in Para. 2621; 

-retaining "practices declared by The 
United Methodist Church to be incom- 
patible with Christian teachings" among 
chargeable offenses; 

-rejecting undermining the ministry 
as a chargeable offense for laity. 

•Concurred with the statement on "An 
Ecumenical Decade: Churches in 
Solidarity with Women." 

•Requested declaratory action by the 
Judicial Council on Para. 2625.3 {Appeal 
of a Ministerial Member of an Annual 
Conference, Local Pastor or Diaconal 
Minister) in disciplinary section on inves- 
tigations, trials and appeals. 

-Betty Story and Arthur Swarthout 



Local Church 

•Recommended to the plenary: 

-a change in disciplinary language to 
allow, rather than require, the pastor to 
be elected chairperson of the Committee 
on Nominations and Personnel; 

-amending Para. 258 so members of a 
professional church staff cannot serve as 
chairperson, vice-chairperson or 
secretary of the Council on Ministries; 

-approval of a number of petitions 
refining the language of several 
paragraphs of the Discipline, but not 
changing the meaning or intent of any. 

•Concurred: 

-with a petition to allow the terms of 
local church officers to begin with either 
the calendar or the conference year; 

-with a petition to insert a new section, 
"The Journey of a Connectional People" 
in Part IV of the Discipline; 

-with a petition that the charge con- 
ference should no longer be able to limit 
the age of trustees to a maximum of 72 
years; 

-with a petition that at least one-third 
of the local church trustees be laymen; 

•Non-concurred: 

-with a petition to remove the require- 
ment that one-third of the local church 
trustees be women. 

-with petitions to eliminate the charge 
conference and transfer its functions to 
either the administrative board or 
church conference. 

-Bill Holt and Laura Okumu 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

Subcommittee that was assigned peti- 
tions dealing with para. 402.2 (banning 
ordination of homosexuals) reported 
recommendations to the full committee. 
Subcommittee divided the 97 petitions 
addressing this paragraph into three 
categories: 

1) asking paragraph be retained as 
presently written (59 petitions); 

2) those that are less restrictive than 
the present paragraph such as calling for 
deletion of the last sentence (12 peti- 
tions); 

3) those advocating more restrictive 
language such as deleting self-avowed 
and leaving only "practicing" (26 peti- 
tions). Subcommittee recommended 
concurrence to retain present language 
15-3-1. 

In debate, an amendment was moved 
to concur with the petition from Rocky 
Mountain Conference that would add 
comma to words "self-avowed, practicing 
homosexual." (The intent of added 
conuna, as interpreted by chair, was to 
imply "or." 



The amendment's mover argued that, 
at present, unless an ordained minister 
who is a practicing homosexual self- 
avows his or her homosexuality, the 
paragraph does not, therefore apply, per- 
mitting loophole for homosexual clergy 
to violate intent of restriction. 

One who opposed amendment said 
subcommittee had discussed this and 
concluded that, with interpretation of 
"either/or" there would be a "witch-hunt 
investigating every minister in all the an- 
nual conferences. 

After considerable debate, amendment 
failed by a better than 2-1 margin. 

A delegate moved to delete entire final 
sentence of the 402.2 paragraph. It was 
argued that if we select one "sin" restrict- 
ing persons from the ordained ministry, 
we must list several others just as bad. 
Another argued that present language 
"provides a balance between compassion 
for the person while maintaining a long- 
established moral principle of the 
church. Vote on amendment to delete 
sentence failed on 2-1 margin. 

When main motion to retain present 
language was put before entire commit- 
tee, it received concurrence vote, 66-27- 
0. The committee also agreed with its 
subcommittee, voting nonconcurrence 
to the more restrictive petitions, 90-0-0. 

A motion presented from fioor to 
suspend conference rules to limit debate 
on issue in plenary to one hour (with no 
amendments permitted) failed. 

Subcommittee on diaconal ministry 
recommended nonconcurrence on a peti- 
tion that would have added the same sen- 
tence in 402.2 (applying to the ordained 
ministry) to paragraph 304. 1, restricting 
diaconal ministers. The committee 
agreed with the subcommittee, 59-24-0. 
A petition to delete from para. 304.1 
reference to "fidelity in marriage and 
celibacy in singleness" failed, 1-84-6. 

The subcommittee that dealt with the 
report of the Commission for the Study 
of Ministry Report approved on a 25-0 
vote a revised series of recommendations 
as substitutes to those presented. 

Keith Pohl 



Audio- and 

Videotapes of 

General Conference 

Available outside UM 

Publishing House 

Display 



April 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



127 



CALENDAR ITEMS 



Consent Calendar 

Calendar items printed with an * 
after the calendar number will 
automatically be placed on the Consent 
Calendar. If any delegate wishes to 
remove an item from the Consent 
Calendar for plenary consideration, 
that delegate shall complete the ap- 
proved form in Room 121 by 3 p.m. on 
the day the calendar item first appears 
in the DCA. Minority reports will be in- 
dicated in parentheses. 

Rule 27(2). 



18* 



15^ 



FAl 

Subject: General Policies Related 
to General Funds 

Petitions: 1148-FA-911-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-90 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-90 of the 
Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



16* 



FA2 
Subject: General Policies 

Petitions: 170-FA-911-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-90 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence in 
favor of petition 1147-FA-911-D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



17* 



FA3 

Subject: General Policies Related 
to General Funds 

Petitions: 1147-FA-911-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-90 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-90 of the 
Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



FA4 
Subject: UM Foundations 

Petitions: 1143-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-89 of the 
Advance DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



19 



FAll 
Subject: GCFA Organization 

Petitions: 1142-FA-905-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-88 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 77; Against 7; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend with this petition as 
printed on page C-88 of the Advance 
DCA with the addition of the following 
sentence: "The provisions of this 
paragraph shall become effective 
immediately upon adoption by the 
General Conference." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



20* FA6 

Subject: Distribution From the 
World Service Fund 

Petitions: 1118-FA-906-l.b 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with the 
changes proposed in Par.906 as printed 
on page C-89 of the Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



21* FAT 

Subject: Fiscal Responsibilities 

Petitions: 2259-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to insert the words "based 
on the perceived missional tasks to 
come before the church" following 



"The General Covmcil on Finance and 
Administration shall establish" in the 
fu^t sentence of Par. 906.1.b(2). 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



22^ 



FA9 

Subject: Calculation of 
Apportionments 

Petitions: 287-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to exclude the amoimts 
reported in colimins 25, 27, 37, and 55- 
71 from the World Service apportion- 
ment formula. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



23 



GAl 

Subject: General Program Board 
Membership 

Petitions: 900-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 81 
For 63; Against 13; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



24* 



GA2 

Subject: General Agency 
Membership 

Petitions: 545-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-87 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 5 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



25^ 



GA3 

Subject: Nominations by Annual 
Conference 

Petitions: 803-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 80 
For 80; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Conou-rence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



128 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 29, 1988 



26* GA4 

Subject: General Pro{(rain Board 
Membership 

Petitions: 804-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 81 
For 80; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



27 GA5 

Subject: Membership on General 
Program Boards 

Petitions: 584-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-87 
Membership 82; Present 79 
For 55; Against 24; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



31 



28 



GA6 

Subject: General Agency Members 
From Other Denominations 

Petitions: 1115-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-87 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 71; Against 6; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



29' 



GA7 

Subject: Process for Evaluating 
General Program Agencies 

Petitions: 910-GA-802-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



30 



GAS 
Subject: Specialized Unit 

Petitions: 507-GA-803-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



FA14 
Subject: General Minutes 

Petitions: 270-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 72; Against 9; Not Voting 3 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to list all local churches of a 
pastoral charge in the appointment and 
statistical listings in the General 
Minutes. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



32 



FA13 
Subject: General Minutes 

Petitions: 2413-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 83; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to list all local churches of a 
pastoral charge in the appointment and 
statistical listings in the General 
Minutes. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



33 



FA12 

Subject: Two Members From 
Central Conferences to Be 
Members of GCFA 

Petitions: 1791-FA-905-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 78; Against 4; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to require that at least two 
of the nine members-at-large of the 
General CouncU on Finance and Ad- 
ministration nominated by the CotmcU 
of Bishops shall represent central con- 
ferences. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



34* 



FA8 

Subject: Calculation of 
Apportionments 

Petitions: 288-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to exclude general church 
apportionment payments. Advance Spe- 
cials, and payments of indebtedness. 



buUdings, and improvements from the 
World Service apportionment formula 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



35' 



FA5 
Subject: Apportionment Formula 

Petitions: 2037-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to delete membership from 
the apportionment formula and to limit 
apportionments to 10% of a local 
church's income. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



36' 



GA9 

Subject: Definitions of Study 
Committee 

Petitions: 114-GA-803-D 
Pages m Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



37* 



GAIO 
Subject: Definition of Theme 

Petitions: 1141-GA-803-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



38* GAll 

Subject: Annual Reports of General 

Agencies 

Petitions: 9U-GA-804-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 80 
For 80; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



39 



FAIO 
Subject: Loans to Farmers 

Petitions: 1399-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 91 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 81; Against 1; Not Voting 2 



April 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



129 



Date: April 27, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition to establish a several mil- 
lion dollar fund to make loans to 
farmers. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



40 



LC 



Subject: The Journey of a 
Connectional People 

Petitions: 1104-LC-lOOD 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-29 and 30 

Membership 94; Present 85 

For 84; Against 1; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends conciir- 
rence with the deletion of the words 
" toward goal s" on page C-30, paragraph 
3, line 4, following "healing, accoimt- 
ability and growth...." The paragraph 
now reads 

"3. Commmiity. The principle 
provides for relationships of Holy Spirit- 
empowered commimity wherein sup- 
port, supervision, healing, accountability 
and growth can take place for persons 
and groups across the denomination." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



41 



CSl 

Subject: Human Sexuality Social 
Principles Par. 71.F 

Petitions: 501-CS-710 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-24 
Membership 104; Present 100 
For 63; Against 32; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee voted concurrence 
with the petition with amendments, so 
the petition reads as follows: 

Revise Par. 71.F as follows: (501-CS- 
710) 

F). Human Sexuality. - We recognize 
that sexuality is a good gift of God, and 
God's good ^ft to all persons, we 
We believe persons may be fully human 
only when that gift is acknowledged and 
affirmed by themselves, the church, and 
society. We call all persons to dieoiplinoe 
that l ea d to the disciplined, respon- 
sible fulfillment of themselves, others, 
and society in the stewardship of this 
gift. We also recognize our limited 
understanding of this complex gift 
and encourage the medical, theological, 
and humanistic di B ciplino s social 
science disciplines to combine in a 
determined effort to understand human 
sexuality more completely. We call the 
church to take the leadership role 
in bringing together these dis- 



ciplines to address this most com- 
plex issue. Fiirther, within the con- 
text of our understanding of this 
gift of God, we recognize that God 
challenges us to find responsible, 
committed, and loving forms of ex- 
pression. 

Although all persons mon and 
womon are sexual beings whether or not 
they are married, sexual relations are 
BOX botwoon a man and a woman is only 
clearly affirmed in the marriage bond. 
Sex may become exploitative within as 
well as outside marriage. We reject all 
sexual expressions which enhance that 
same humanity, in the midst of diverse 
opinion as to what constitutes that en- 
hancement. 

We deplore all forms of the commer- 
cialization and exploitation of sex with 
their consequent cheapening and 
degradation of human personality. We 
call for Btorn strict enforcement of laws 
prohibiting the sexual exploitation or 
use of children by adults. We call for the 
establishment of adequate protective ser- 
vices, guidance, and counseling oppor- 
tunities for children thus abused. We 
insist that all persons, regardless 
of age, gender, marital status, or 
sexual orientation are entitled to 
have their human and civil rights 
ensured. 

We recognize the continuing need for 
full, positive, and factual and frank 
sex education opportunities for children, 
youth, and adults. The chiu-ch offers a 
uniq[ue opportunity to give quality 
guidance/education in this area. 

Homosexual persons no less than 
heterosexual persons are individuals of 
sacred worth. All persons need the 
ministry and guidance of the Church in 
their struggles for himian fulfillment, as 
well as the spiritual and emotional care 
of a fellowship which enables reconcil- 
ing relationships with God, with others, 
and with self. Further wo in s ist that all 
persons aro ontitlod to havo thoir 
human and civil right s on s urod, though 
Although we do not condone the prac- 
tice of homosexuality and consider this 
practice incompatible with Christian 
teaching, we affirm that God's grace 
is available to all. We commit oxxr- 
selves to be in ministry for and 
with all persons. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



42 CSl (Minority Report) 
Subject: Human Sexuality Social 
Principles Par. 71.F 

Petitions: 501-CS-71-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership ; Present 
For ; Against ; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

We the undersigned move to amend 
the last paragraph of Petition 501-CS-71- 
D by deleting " Although wo do not con 
done the practico of homo s exuality and 
ooneidor the practice incompatible with 
Christian toaching " and substitute the 
following: "We find mixed testimony 
about the practice of 
homosexuality in Scripture, tradi- 
tion, and in the human sciences." 

Sally Ernst 

Arthur Brandenburg 

Richard S. Parker 

Joy Perry 

Ellen A Brubaker 

Richard Truitt 

J. Howard Wright 

Charles O. Dundas 

Jack D. Heacock 

James Lawson, Jr. 

Donald L. Carver 

Ann L. Sablan 

Pat Callbeck Harper 

KeyB. Dillard 

Joyce Stanton 

William C. Kirkwood 

D.RusseU Walker 

Sara Shingler 

Pauline Niles 

Tex Sample 

Euba Harris-Winston 

Avenell Harms 

Lois Seifert 

Leon Adkins 

Ryan Kevin Edison 

Sally Geis 

Joseph Sprague 

Ronald Bretsch 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



43' 



MN 
Subject: Amend Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 61-MN-402-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-47 
Membership 98; Present 90 
For 90; Against 90; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



44 



LC 
Subject: The Church 

Petitions: 1032-LC-lOl-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-29 



130 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 29, 1988 



Membership 94; Present 89 
For 89; Against 2; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



45* HE20 

Subject: Responsibilities of 

GBHEM 

Petitions: 838-HE-1516-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



46^ 



HE19 
Subject: Objectives of GBHEM 

Petitions: 832-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-110 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



47* IJ17 

Subject: Chargeable Offences 

Petitions: 518 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-128 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 61; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence, already acted upon 
in petition 431. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



48 



IJ16 
Subject: Chargeables Offenses 

Petitions: 361 

Pages in Advance DCA:C-128 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 60; Against 2; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence, already acted upon 
in petition 431. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



49* HE22 
Subject: GBHEM 

Petitions: 418-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: CI 10 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 



Recommend concurrence. 

Note: Printed in Advance DCA are 
paragraph 1505.8 and paragraph 
1505.20. These are not a part of this peti- 
tion and are dealt with elsewhere. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



50' 



HE21 
Subject: Objectives of GBHEM 

Petitions: 836-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: Clll 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



51 



U15 

Subject: Chargeable Offences, 
Racial and/ or Sexual Harassment 

Petitions: 431 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-128 

Membership 72; Present 62 

For 62; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence as amended: 
Separate ( ) racial harassment, ( ) 

sexual harassment 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



52* U14 

Subject: Chargeables Offenses 

Petitions: 2199 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 62; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



53' 



HE18 
Subject: Officers 

Petitions: 839-HE-1508-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



54* 



HE17 

Subject: Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries 

Petitions: 844-HE-1512-D and 843-HE- 

1511-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-112 



Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



55* HE16 

Subject: Duties of Division of 

Chaplains and Related Ministries 

Petitions: 4 1-HE- 15 11-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 73; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Concurrence 

Note: In the Advance DCA 843-HE- 
1512-D is printed as a part of 419-HE- 
151 1-D and appears in its place farther 
down on the page. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Consent Calendar No. 1 

Rule 27.2 
Advance DCA, p. B-18 

Calendar Items 

15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 
26, 29, 30, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 45, 
46, 47, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 



AprU 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



131 



Proceedings of the 1988 General Conference of 
The United Methodist Church 



Committee on Journal 

Report 
The Committee on Joiimal 

hereby certifies as accurate, with the 
following corrections, the proceedings 
as printed in the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate for Wednesday, April 27, 1988. 

Daily Edition, p. 114, col. 2: Delete 
"The Address Search Committee" at 
the beginning of Marcus Fang's speech 
and insert: "Bishop Kulah, ^ests, 
and members of the Conference- 
The General Conference has 
charged the National Association 
of Annual Conference Lay 
Leaders with the responsibility 
for the Laity Address. This qiiad- 
rennium, the national associa- 
tion chose to conduct a 
church-wide search for the 
speech which best captiires the 
spirit and visions of United 
Methodist laity. Hence, it con- 
vened a Laity Address Search 
Committee which..." 

Daily Edition, p. 116, col. 2,1. l:Sub- 
stitute "made" for "beat". 

Daily Edition, p. 117, col. 1, par. 10: 
Substitute "I tried to get the chair" 
for "or try to get a chair." 

Daily Edition, p. 117, col. 2, par. 10: 
Substitute "prevailed" for "revealed". 

Daily Edition, p. 1 18, col. 2, 1. 3: Sub- 
stitute "ordination" for "organiza- 
tion". 

Daily Edition, p. 118, col. 2, par. 7: 
Statement was made by Waters, not 
Dundas. Substitute "intends" for 
"tends" in the last sentence. 

Daily Edition, p. 118, col. 2, par. 8: 
Statement was made by Dundas, not 
Waters. 

Daily Edition, p. 119, col. 1, par. 8: 
Substitute "came up on" for "became 
up on the agenda of. 

Daily Edition, p. 119, col. 2, par. 3: 
Substitute "officer" for "order". 

Jamima DeMarcus (chair) 
Section A, row 15 



Thursday Morning 
AprU 28, 1988 

Bishop EdselA. Ammons, presiding 

BISHOP AMMONS: I am confident 
that you would want me on your behalf to 
express profound appreciation for the 
music, which has been rendered by our 
special choir this morning. We're going to 
be led in worship this morning by 
Reverend Yolanda Pupo-Ortiz, liturgist, 
and Bishop Woodie W. White, the Illinois 
Area. Will you be quietly meditative as 
they lead us in moments of worship and 
meditation? 

(Worship Service) 

BISHOP AMMONS: Now I think I 
know how most of you feel. I certainly 
know how I feel. We're probably more in- 
clined to want to dance a bit this morning 
rather than to press ahead with legisla- 
tion. But we're going to dance through the 
legislation too. The spirit with which this 
sermon has been delivered and this mo- 
ment will be sustained for the rest of the 
day. I'm confident of that. While his col- 
leagues are embracing him, I'm going to 
ask Bishop Richard Wilke... while they are 
embracing Bishop White.. .I'm going to 
ask Bishop Wilke if he will come for a mo- 
ment of special privilege. 

BISHOP RICHARD WILKE: Thank 
you, Bishop. Four years ago this General 
Conference gave a mandate to the Board 
of Church and Society to promote 
abstinence from alcohol and drugs, and a 
number of results have occurred. You will 
be hearing more about several of them, in- 
cluding a video caUed A Call to Care show- 
ing children, youth, and adults who 
explore problems of chemical substance 
abuse. 

There has also been a marvelous essay 
contest for junior high and senior high 
yoimg people. Some of the key individuals 
who have been a part of both the video and 
the essay contest are well known to you, 
and I want them to stand if they are here 
at this moment. One is Pastor Don 
Forsman of El Paso. Don, are you here? 
Would you please stand and wave at us? 
Thank you. Don's right over here. Don's 
been instrumental in this work. Dr. Bever- 



ly Jackson, formerly from Newton, Kan- 
sas, and now on the staff of the Board of 
Church and Society, has been the force 
both behind the video and the essay con- 
test. Beverly, are you here? Would you 
please stand and wave at us? There she is 
on my right. Good Beverly, thank you. 
And cooperating with the Board of 
Church and Society in the essay contest 
was the United Methodist Reporter, Spur- 
geon Dunnam, Editor and Chief, General 
Manager. Spurgeon, are you here? Would 
you wave at us? Thank you, Spurgeon, and 
thank you for your help in the essay con- 
test. And that's my privilege now. 

It's my understanding that the two 
young people who won this contest in 
which over 400 students participated, a 
contest under the title "What Are Benefits 
of a Drug Free Lifestyle?" The first place 
winner of the junior high division on the 
subject, "Why I Feel Good About Saying 
No to Alcohol and Other Drugs," is Miss 
Deborah Davis in the ninth grade, First 
UMC, Livingston, Tennessee. Is Deborah 
Davis here? Would you stand and wave, 
Deborah? Where are you? In the back? 
There she is-right in the very back 
entrance. Stand and wave at us again, 
Deborah Davis. Thank you, Deborah. 
"Why I Feel Good About Saying No to Al- 
cohol and Other Drugs." 

And the winner of the senior high 
division, a twelflh-grader from the First 
UMC of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, right here 
in our host Missouri East Conference, 
writing under the subject of "Why It Is 
Easier to Achieve My Goals Without Al- 
cohol and Other Drugs," Miss Susie Ken- 
nedy. Susie, where are you? Would you 
wave and stand? There she is at my far 
right: Miss Susie Kennedy, Poplar Bluff, 
Missouri. In addition to their cash awards, 
you wiU find in this week's United 
Methodist Reporter their complete essays 
along with the top three winners in both 
divisions. I hope you will take this, share 
it with your people, with your young 
people; and this will make a great con- 
tribution to the life of the church. Thank 
you very much. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Thank you, 
Bishop Wilke. We move now to the agen- 
da items for the morning. First, a report 
of the Council of Bishops from Bishop 
Pa»il Duffey, the secretary of the council. 



132 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 29, 1988 



BISHOP PAUL DUFFEY: Mr. Chair- 
man, thank you. If you will, turn please to 
108 in today's Daily Christian Advo- 
cate. ..p&ge 108 in today's Christian Advo- 
cate. You will find the report of the Council 
of Bishops to the conference concerning 
an assignment given us last quadrennium. 
The General Conference of 1984 took two 
actions regarding the Mission Society for 
United Methodists. One, the Conference 
voted nonconcurrence on a petition ap- 
proving the Mission Society for United 
Methodists as an alternative mission 
sending agency. And, two, establishing a 
dialogue between the directors and staff of 
the General Board of Global Ministries 
and persons who had concerns about the 
emphasis of the board on evangelism and 
Wesleyan theology. 

The Council of Bishops was suggested 
as the agency to enable and coordinate the 
proposed dialogues. The coimcil sub- 
sequently appointed Bishops Thomas, 
Duffey, Ault, Borgen, and DeWitt to serve 
on behalf of the council. Upon Bishop 
Thomas' resignation, Bishop Schowen- 
gerdt was named to the council, to serve 
for the council. The Mission Society for 
United Methodists was invited to repre- 
sent persons who had concerns about the 
emphasis of the board on evangelism and 
Wesleyan theology. 

The dialogues began at the site of the 
1984 General Conference and have con- 
tinued on a regular basis. Eleven meetings 
have been held. The sessions have been 
congenial and have enjoyed a modest de- 
gree of success. All parties have been faith- 
ful in attendance. We express our 
gratitude to the board for their participa- 
tion and for bearing the expenses of the 
representatives. We express our apprecia- 
tion to the representatives of the society 
for their participation and to the Council 
on Finance and Administration for 
financing the expenses of the repre- 
sentatives of the society. 

The items receiving attention during 
the dialogues are summarized here: 

1. Review of the actions and anticipa- 
tions of the General Conference. 

2. Issues about procedures as to con- 
fidentiality, mutual trust, accountability. 

3. Discussions about the General Board 
of Global Ministries' personnel, policies, 
practices. 

4. Balance of theological perspectives 
among the staff members of the board. 

5. Accurate reports as to numbers and 
assignment of Board of Global Ministries 
personnel to areas of service. 



6. Recruitment, testing, deployment of 
personnel. 

7. Response to and evaluation of 
materials provided by the board as re- 
quested by the society. 

8. Evangelism as an integral part of mis- 
sions. 

9. The board proposal for an emphasis 
on evangelism. 

10. The society's assurance that they 
would not send personnel into areas 
where The United Methodist Church and 
the Board of Global Ministries have had 
historic relations and responsibilities, 
and, specifically, that they would not go to 
any place where they were not invited by 
the constituted church officials. 

11. Evaluation of complaints that some 
Board of Global Ministries personnel had 
made efforts to block acceptance of the 
society. 

12. Evaluations of theological state- 
ments by the society and the board. 

13. Review of statements of purpose by 
the board and the society. 

14. The paper from CIEMAL repre- 
sentatives as referred to this dialogue by 
the Council of Bishops. 

15. Responses of individual bishops con- 
cerning appointments of clergy to the 
society. 

16. Financial accountability. The repre- 
sentatives of the society clearly indicated 
their strong support for full payment of 
World Service Apportionments and full 
support of Advance Mission Specials. The 
entire dialogue group fully endorsed the 
Bishops' Appeal for Partner Churches in 
Crisis. The financial data of the board is a 
matter of open record for the denomina- 
tion and is available annually. The society 
is a member of the Evangelical Council for 
Financial Accountability and reports to 
that body. Further, the society sent a copy 
of their balance sheet to the Board of 
Global Ministries for their information. 

While the society has clearly stated its 
firm intention to continue as a separate 
entity, they have also stated that they 
desire not a competitive stance but a 
cooperative, supplementary one. Their in- 
tention was declared to be to go to areas 
where no United Methodist work exists 
and to open new areas of work with both 
a personal evangelistic thrust and a 
wholistic social involvement. 

The board representatives discussed 
freely the complaints registered concern- 
ing evangelism and theology. They have 
insisted that evangelistic missions are part 
of their overall ministry. They have af- 



firmed the legitimacy of various theologi- 
cal emphases but denied that the board 
staff and personnel are dominated by a 
liberation theology. They specifically 
denied making appointments of mis- 
sionaries who support liberation theology 
to the exclusion of others with a more 
traditional evangelical theology. 

The board shared with the society infor- 
mation concerning recruitment, testing, 
and deployment of personnel and invited 
the society to have an observer at the 
board missionary personnel committee. 
This option was not exercised by the 
society. The board has put into effect 
changes of structure and personnel that 
had been in progress for some time. The 
recent actions of the board in establishing 
a Committee on Evangelism with an as- 
sociate general secretary in charge of that 
emphasis is a case in point. The board has 
also taken steps to establish clearer lines 
of accountability within the structure and 
operation of the board. The general board 
has opened up quite a large number of new 
areas of work and a variety of missions 
ministries. 

The statement from a CIEMAL ^ 
workshop, April 1986, read to the Council ; 
of Bishops of The United Methodist j 
Church by representatives from CIEMAL, 
was referred to this committee and has 
received careful attention. CIEMAL 
stands for the Covmcil of the Evangelical 
Methodist Churches in Latin America. 
The workshop paper alleged that repre- 
sentatives of the Mission Society had in- 
itiated work in Columbia, Peru, and Chile 
and had created division and confusion. 
These contacts were reported to have 
begun around 1980. The fact is that the 
society was not organized until February, 
1984. Thus, there were no representatives 
of the society involved. It is true that at 
least one person who was involved in the 
earlier visits has since affiliated with the 
society. CIEMAL complained that society 
representatives entered Columbia with- 
out consultation with CIEMAL, who was 
sponsoring the church in that country. 
The society maintains that it responded to 
the designated leadership of the church in 
Columbia and believed they had acted 
properly. Misunderstandings still exist in 
those countries. 

More recent correspondence from 
CIEMAL affirms the confidence they have 
in the integrity of the witnesses of the 
April 1986 meeting and continues to af- 
fuTn their understanding that the work of 
the society is divisive and intrusive. 



April 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



133 



dEMAL affirms that all relations to The 
United Methodist Church should be 
through the General Board of Global Min- 
istries. CIEMAL has expressed concern 
about the efforts of the society in Brazil. 
Recent correspondence indicates com- 
plaints from Austria where disruption and 
distrust have developed. The correspon- 
dent indicates a clear connection with the 
Mission Society for United Methodists. 

The theological statement concerning 
mission that was developed by the board 
in cooperation with Partners in Mission 
aroimd the world was studied and criti- 
qued. The discussion produced several 
suggestions for clarification and em- 
phasis, and the board representatives in- 
dicated they would consider these in 
future editions of the pamphlets. 

Concerning the appointment of clergy 
to the society, the dialogue discussed the 
specific actions of the General Conference 
as well as the responsibilities of individual 
bishops. The General Conference voted 
nonconcurrence to a petition asking for 
approval of the society as a sending agen- 
cy. In the view of many, this action has 
placed appointment of clergy to the 
society in a distinctly different category. 
Bishops have to deal with this matter in- 
dividually. 

After all the discussions we have not 
been able to resolve all the matters before 
us. There still exist differences concerning 
the theology of mission and evangelism. 
Different definitions are held about the 
term evangelical. Differences exist about 
confidence in the staff and personnel of 
both the board and the society. Differen- 
ces continue as to the public debate and 
release of information from dialogues and 
about the board and the society. Strong 
differences relate to the accuracy and in- 
tent of the actions of and reports from 
CIEMAL. Differences continue as to 
responsibility for and response to the in- 
digenous churches. We have differences 
about appointments to and sending out of 
representative personnel by the society. 
Finally, there are sharp differences as to 
the desirability of the continued existence 
of the society as a sending agency. 

In conclusion, we make the following 
recommendations: 

We are glad that much has been redis- 
covered about our Wesleyan traditions 
and recommend that United Methodists 
continue to make progress toward the ful- 
fillment of the General Conference ex- 
pressed desire that we clarify and enhance 



our emphasis upon this tradition, par- 
ticularly in evangelism and theology. 

We recommend that this dialogue be 
discontinued in its present form, that we 
reaffirm the stance that the 1984 General 
Conference took naming the General 
Board of Global Ministries as the only 
authorized sending agency of The United 
Methodist Church, and that the Board of 
Global Ministries continue to be open for 
informal conversations with all of its con- 
stituency, including individuals and 
groups, in making progress and emphasiz- 
ing evangelism and in continued refine- 
ment of theological emphases in line with 
our Wesleyan understanding. 

In the beginning the Coimcil of Bishops 
representatives had hoped that we would 
be able to reach such reconciliation of is- 
sues that the society would find no reason 
for its continuing existence. In the begin- 
ning some representatives of the Mission 
Society for United Methodists indicated 
the understanding that the society would 
continue indefinitely. The bishops have 
sought to effect reconciliation but have 
not reached the level of our expectations. 
We have no alternative but to report this 
situation and to make our recommenda- 
tion that persons share concerns through 
regular channels and their commitment to 
ministry through the authorized sending 
agency, (applause) 

Mr. Chairman, this is the report of the 
council to the conference. I think that our 
understanding was it is simply to the body. 
Petitions relating to a variety of these is- 
sues have been referred to the various 
committees and are being processed, and 
we feel that in behalf of the council we 
have now reported and fulfilled the obliga- 
tion of the council to the conference. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Thank you very 
much. I think it is clear that no action is 
required at this time. It is a report to you. 
Yes, back.. .microphone 13. 

BETTY WHTTEHURST (Virginia): I 
would like to make a motion regarding the 
proceedings of the conference. I move that 
bishops of autonomous Methodist chur- 
ches be seated in places of honor rather 
than assigned to the back row of the con- 
ference floor. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Now, that is, it 
seems to the chair, an inappropriate mo- 
tion at this moment. We will come to a 
point though when that would be very 
much in order. We're dealing still with the 
overflow from the bishops' report and the 
dialogue with the commission. 



WHITEHURST: Will I be able to do that 
later then? 

AMMONS: Yes, I'll recognize you later. 
Does anybody want to ask any questions 
of Bishop Duffey? All right then, we will 
assume that this is a report and other 
pieces of this report will be dealt with in 
the several legislative committees. We 
want to move now to the report from the 
Courtesies Committee and we will hear 
from Clifton Ives. 

CLIFTON IVES (Maine): We would like 
to ask while I do one other thing for 
Deborah Davis and Susie Kennedy, who 
were introduced just a moment ago, if they 
would come forward and be here. Are they 
still in the room, I hope? If they would 
come forward and be with us in just a mo- 
ment, I would appreciate that. 

We want to acknowledge today from the 
Courtesies and PrivOeges Committee the 
presence of those persons from 
autonomous churches who are in our 
midst. We know that they have graced us 
with their wisdom and their under- 
standing and the way they dance and that 
we appreciate their dance shared with our 
dance in this time that we share together. 
I want to, in a way, to symbolize that by 
asking Bishop Woodrow Hearn if he 
would take a moment to introduce those 
bishops of the autonomous churches who 
are with us that we might recognize them. 
Bishop Hearn. 

BISHOP HEARN: An affiliated 
autonomous church is defined by the Dis- 
cipline as a church in which The United 
Methodist Church assisted in its founding 
but which is today a totally self-governing 
church. Our conference is blessed by 
having the bishops, president, and, in one 
case, the secretary of these churches with 
us; and it is a great honor for us to have 
them in our midst. And this morning I 
wish to present these bishops, our presi- 
dent, heads of churches to our General 
Conference, (applause) 

The first is Bishop Pagura, who is presi- 
dent of The Evangelical Methodist 
Church of Argentina. Next, is Bishop 
Poma, who is the president.. .the bishop of 
The Evangelical Methodist Church of 
Bolivia. Bishop Maia from The Methodist 
Church of Brazil; President Clarke, who 
comes from The Methodist Church of the 
Caribbean and the Americas; Bishop Diaz 
of The Methodist Church of Costa Rica; 
Bishop Rodriguez of The Methodist 
Church of Cuba; Bishop Sarabia of The 
Methodist Church of Ecuador; Bishop 
Morales, who is from our church in 



134 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 29, 1988 



Panama; Bishop Hernandez from Mexico; 
Bishop Avila from Mexico. I didn't get that 
name right; so let me get it corrected: 
Bishop Ruiz from Mexico. Dr. Beck, who 
is the secretary of The Methodist Church 
in Great Britain; Bishop Ochoa, The 
Methodist Church of Brazil; the bishop of 
Indonesia, Bishop Panggabean; Bishop 
Ho, who is the bishop of the church in Sin- 
gapore, (applause) 

rVES: Deborah and Susie, would you 
come forward just for a moment? I know 
that a lot of people didn't see you when you 
were introduced before. These two per- 
sons that Bishop Wilke introduced to you 
a few moments ago represent the United 
Methodist youth of our church in a fine 
and wonderful way today, and we wanted 
you to come forward and to receive the 
greeting of the conference again and to be 
welcomed here by the president of the 
conference today. Thank you. (applause) 
That concludes our report for today. 

BISHOP AMMONS: WhUe you're 
there. Cliff, there was a motion attempted 
earlier in reference to the seating arrange- 
ments for our bishops who were just intro- 
duced. May I suggest to you that they have 
been with us for over a week. They were 
with us in Kansas City at the meeting of 
Methodist bishops, and I'm sure they are 
getting a feel for what happens at the 
General Conference as few have in the 
past. Some of them are official delegates 
and are sitting amongst you. If we put 
them up here where we are, they have 
nothing to do with the rest of the con- 
ference but sit among, as they call us, lean- 
ing palms up here. Some are visitors and 
sitting in the VIP section. It seems to me 
that if there is a real concern about this, it 
will be a simple matter for the conference 
to express itself and have this matter 
referred to the Commission on the 
Greneral Conference. Do you still wish to 
proceed with your motion? Go ahead, 
microphone 13. 

BETTY WHTTEHURST (Virginia): I 
move that bishops of autonomous 
Methodist churches be seated in places of 
honor, rather than assigned to the back 
row of the conference floor, unless they 
are members of delegations. 

BISHOP AMMONS: When you say 
places of honor, I assume that every place 
in the bar of conference and beyond it are 
places of honor. What do you mean by 
that? 

WHTTEHURST: By that I mean that 
the bishops from other countries perceive 
being assigned to the back row of the con- 



ference floor as being relegated to the last 
positions. It seems to me that we are al- 
most guilty of saying we have second-class 
citizens here because they are not mem- 
bers of a United Methodist church, but are 
members of an autonomous Methodist 
church. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Would the mem- 
bers of the body express its opinion. Would 
you like to have this referred to the 
General Commission of the General Con- 
ference, if so lift the hand? Thank you. Op- 
posed? And it's referenced, and that 
means that it will be dealt with carefully 
and considerately. Thank you very much. 
We have.. .listen to Bishop Hearn, please. 
We'll come right back to you. 

BISHOP HEARN: We have just been in- 
formed that this morning an additional 
bishop from an affiliated autonomous 
church has arrived. I do not know where 
he is in the hall; but if he is here, I would 
like to recognize Bishop Castro from The 
Evangelical Methodist Church of the 
Philippines. Would he stand so he may be 
greeted? He is here in the hall waving his 
hand. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right, thank 
you. And this issue is one which is of con- 
cern to most of you, I'm sure, and it will be 
referred and properly cared for. Now we 
come to the agenda. Yes, sir. I'm sorry, 
microphone 9. 

ROY BLESSING (West Virginia): We 
have a large body of Christians meeting in 
the rally in Washington DC tomorrow; 
therefore I would like to move the follow- 
ing: I move that the Council of Bishops 
send the fraternal greetings of the General 
Conference to the one million Christians 
attending the Washington for Jesus rally 
in Washington DC on AprU 29th, 1988. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Is that supported? 
Does anybody wish to speak to that mo- 
tion? Yes, all the way in the back? 
Anybody wish to speak for or against it? If 
you will vote in favor, lift the hand? Thank 
you. Opposed? And it prevails. It prevails. 
Thank you. Now we move to the report 
from the Agenda Committee. John Bevan. 
Let us be certain to get the written motion 
as quickly as possible. 

JOHN BEVAN: Bishop Ammons, for 
the agenda tomorrow it appears at this 
time the majority of time will be again 
given to the legislative committees. At 
9:00 a.m., immediately following worship, 
there will be a presentation of the retiring 
bishops, which originally had been 
scheduled for today, but is rescheduled. At 
9:15 there will be a period for courtesies. 



Then as we see it at this time, at 9:20 we 
should be able to begin considering calen- 
dar items, and then at 11:00 adjourn to 
legislative committees. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right, that is 
your proposed agenda for tomorrow 
morning. That's the agenda for tomorrow 
morning. Yes, sir, I see your card here. 
Microphone 7. 

RHETT JACKSON (South Carolina): 
Bishop, I would like to make a motion 
about an order of the day for Saturday 
morning. Is that in order for me to do that 
at this time? 

BISHOP AMMONS: Does it have to do 
with the agenda, sir? 

JACKSON: WeU, it has to do with the 
agenda, yes; but this is Saturday morning 
agenda. 

BISHOP AMMONS: The rules suggest 
that any item having to do with the agen- 
da has to be referred to the committee, 
bearing the signatures of a number of per- 
sons; and then it will come back to us for 
consideration if supported by a third of the 
house. 

JACKSON: Can I make this motion and 
see? 

BISHOP AMMONS: You make your 
motion; and then I'm going to ask Jack 
Bevan to speak to it, and see where we go 
with it. 

JACKSON: I move that the General 
Conference grant an order of the day for 
the general church Missional Priority 
Coordinating Committee to make a visual 
report to the conference on Saturday 
morning; time needed, 20 minutes. And if 
this is a motion I can make now, I would 
like to speak to it, after your ruling about 
if we need to suspend the rules. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right. Jack, has 
the committee considered that? 

BEVAN: Yes, Bishop, the committee 
received a request jointly from the Mis- 
sional Priority Coordinating Committee 
and the Commission on Religion and 
Race, requesting 45 minutes for this 
morning or for sometime today. The com- 
mittee considered the request, consulted 
with the Commission on the General Con- 
ference, with the secretary of the General 
Conference, with the Council of Bishops, 
and concluded that because there already 
is in the Advance Daily Christian Advo- 
cate, a report from the Missional Priority 
Coordinating Committee, that the only 
proper way for presentation of materials 
from those groups to be brought to the 
General Conference was through the 
legislative committee. Accordingly, veiy 



AprU 29, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



135 



regrettably, the Agenda Committee felt it 
had no option but to deny the request 
based on the rules of the conference. In 
I conversation then with representatives of 
the requesting group, I suggested that 
there are two alternative methods to 
proceed: one, to challenge the ruling of the 
committee-which requires twenty signa- 
tures--or a request that the rules be set 
aside. I assume that this is the latter--a re- 
quest for setting aside of the rules of the 
General Conference. 

JACKSON: Thank you. I would like to 
appeal to the body to set the rules aside be- 
cause I think it's very important that this 
General Conference... 

BISHOP AMMONS: AU right, your mo- 
tion to suspend the rules, is that sup- 
ported? That will require a two-third vote 
of the house; it's imdebatable. If you will 
suspend the rules in order to allow con- 
sideration of an agenda item, please lifl 
the hand. Thank you. Opposed? You have 
suspended the rules. Now proceed. 

JACKSON: Thank you very much. 
Thank you. Conference. Question.. .my 
question has been answered. Now can I 
speak to this motion briefly? When we 
asked the General Conference Committee 
for this time, we were told that they were 
getting so many requests of this kind. 
Well, I don't believe there is a single re- 
quest of this kind other than this one be- 
cause a missional priority calls for massive 
reordering of priorities all over the 
church, and much has happened in the 
last four years. Indeed much has happened 
in the last 12 years, and we very much 
would like to use 20 minutes of your time 
for this report. And, Bishop, I think we 
have Jack Heacock prepared to make a 
brief statement on behalf of this motion. 
Thank you very much. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Does anybody 
have any question about what is being re- 
quested? I'm not certain we need to take 
more time to discuss it. I think it is pretty 
clear as to what's being requested. Now 
you suspended the rules in order to con- 
sider this. You need to act in order to re- 
quest it as an agenda item for Saturday 
morning-twenty minutes. If you will sus- 
tain that motion, lift the hand. Thank you. 
Opposed? And you have sustained the mo- 
tion. It will be an agenda item. All right, 
yes, right here. Microphone 3, and I will 
get back here. 

PHIL CARVER Gowa): I'd like to re- 
quest a moment of persona] privilege to 
present a resolution. 

BISHOP AMMONS: AU right, PhU. 



CARVER: Whereas, all delegates to this 
General Conference have the right to fully 
participate in all deliberations; and 
whereas, repeated requests to provide 
translators at legislative sections yester- 
day were left unanswered; and whereas, 
some delegates with multiple language 
skills were limited in their ability to par- 
ticipate in debate because they also were 
serving as interpreters. Therefore, be it 
resolved that the appropriate officials of 
the General Conference be directed to im- 
mediately seek and assign translators who 
are not delegates to the General Con- 
ference for all delegates needing such ser- 
vices. If I have a second I'll speak to it. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right, go ahead 
Phil. 

CARVER: In our legislative committee 
yesterday, several times people requested 
the need for translators to interpret the 
debate that was going on. Some of those 
needs were met but not consistently and 
as the day progressed we found it more 
and more difficult to find interpreters for 
the members of our section. Upon visiting 
with others, I discovered there was also a 
problem in other sections and it seems to 
me that this is a very important issue that 
we need to address firmly. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Does anybody else 
wish to speak on that matter? If you will 
approve will you lift a hand? Thank yoa 
Opposed? And the committee is properly 
informed and advised. Now right here sir. 
Yes sir. Microphone 2 1 believe. 

CHARLES LIPPSE (Holston): I wish to 
make a motion concerning the facilities 
and equipment needed by the legislative 
committees in order for them to do their 
work more effectively. May I present that 
motion now please? 

BISHOP AMMONS: Make your motion 
and we'll see if it is supported. 

LIPPSE: I move that the Commission 
on the General Conference and the Local 
Committee be requested to provide the 
legislative committees of the 1992 General 
Conference adequate rooms and equip- 
ment to do their important work; namely, 
adjacent rooms for subcommittees and 
tables for committee and subcommittee 
members. And if it's seconded, I want to 
speak to it please. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right, it is 
seconded. 

LIPPSE: Well, the rationale is that we 
have such important work to do. We've 
done a lot of homework coming here. We 
have in our briefcases two DCA's, the Dis- 
cipline, the Book of Resolutions; in our 



files, writing materials. Some of us are 
meeting four subcommittees in the same 
room in different comers, and we are 
trying to balance all those materials and 
in all of the expediting of concurrence and 
nonconcurrence, we simply don't have the 
space and the equipment we need to do 
that important work and a proof text 
would be that it is easier for a camel to pass 
through the eye of a needle. 

BISHOP AMMONS: All right, we'U see 
who dances with that one. Does anybody 
wish to speak against that? All right, I 
think we're ready to vote. If you will ap- 
prove the motion lift a hand. Thank you. 
Opposed? The motion is dearly sup- 
ported. Now sir right here, then I'll come 
to you Fran. Microphone 7. 1 think I hear 
it now, tiy it again. 

RAY GOENS (Texas): Bishop, this is a 
motion that relates to the functions of the 
Agenda Committee. I believe it would be 
ordered at this time. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Go ahead. 

GOENS: This is a motion as follows. All 
resolutions printed in the Advance DCA 
Section D-1 and D-2 shall be presented to 
General Conference by the end of the 
morning plenary session, Wednesday, 
May 4, 1988. Otherwise such resolution 
shall not be received or acted upon by this 
General Conference. If I have a second I 
would like to speak to it. 

BISHOP AMMONS: It seems to me we 
would have to set aside the rules to deal 
with that, would we not? The process is 
pretty clear. Are you proposing a motion 
that the rules be suspended to deal with 
this? 

GOENS: I do, yes. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Is that supported? 
It takes a two-third vote to suspend the 
rules. If you would suspend the rules to 
deal with that issue, lift a hand. Thank 
you. Opposed? It is clearly not suspended. 
We'll have to move on. Now Fran. 

FRANCES ALGUIRE (Northern Il- 
linois): We have appreciated hearing the 
needs of legislative committees for space, 
interpreters, et cetera, I remind you the 
Commission on General Conference has 
an office just to the right outside of this 
meeting room. No. 115, if you would kind- 
ly come there to register your needs they 
will be cared for. Thank yoa 

BISHOP AMMONS: Thank you Fran. 
We're ready now for, well, I think Bishop 
Heam has another introduction to make 
at this time. Woody. 

BISHOP HEARN: We have had bishops 
from Korea and also from Hong Kong. We 



136 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 29, 1988 



did not know that they were in the room, 
but I'd like to recognize them and see if 
they are here. Bishop Chang from The 
Methodist Church of Korea. Bishop 
Chang are you in the room? Bishop 
Chang. I don't see him. Is Bishop Yong 
from Hong Kong here? and Bishop Kwong 
from Hong Kong? Here we are in the back. 
All the way back, (applause) We are happy 
to add these bishops to the ones that we 
have already greeted and are delighted to 
have them give us the honor of their 
presence in this conference. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Thank you. Now 
we are ready to hear from Jim Walker and 
the Presiding Officers Committee. 

JIM WALKER: Bishop Ammons, fellow 
delegates, your Committee on Presiding 
Officers is pleased to announce that our 
presiding officer for tomorrow morning's 
session will be Bishop Robert M. Black- 
man of the Richmond Area, Virginia. 
Thank you. 

BISHOP AMMONS: Thank you, and 
we'll be in prayer for Bob the rest of the 
day. (laughter) Just before we adjourn I'd 
like to express my appreciation to you for 
the manner in which you've honored this 
morning. The spirit with which we began 
was indeed sustained and will be for the 
remainder of our conference, I'm certain. 

We're going to be led in closing prayer 
by a friend of all of us, a colleague, an es- 
teemed colleague, Bishop Noah Watson 
Moore, respected senior member of the 
council, elected to this council in 1960, 
residing in the New Orleans Area, and in 
the Houston Area, and in the Missouri 
Area, before going to Nebraska in 1968 
where he remained until his retirement in 
1972. I am especially pleased to present 
him to you at this time to lead us in our 
closing prayer. Bishop Moore. 

(Prayer) 



o o 



Q 



O 



©Cokesbury 
Books • Bibles • Church Supplies / 



INVITES YOU TO MEET: 
Hoyt Hickman 

Author of: 

UM Altars 

Primer for Church Worship 

Handbook of the Christian Year 

Autographing books 

Friday April 29 

12:30 - 1:30 

Cokesbury Display 

• Have your books 
autographed! 

• Located in the Cokesbury 
display at General 
Conference. 

• Look at this space daily for 
information concerning 
other autographings. 

"1 P-090-DCA "" 



o 



o 



o 



o o 



o 



J 



Daily Report 

Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



VoLvn 



St. Louis, Missouri, Saturday, April 30, 1988 



No. 5 



Conference Prepares to Shift Into High Gear 

Saturday business includes 'Africa Initiative' 



A weekend of work, worship, drama, 
and, maybe, even a little rest and sight- 
seeing, awaits General Conference 



First though, Saturday morning they 
will hear a report from the 1985-88 quad- 
rennial missional priority on strengthen- 
ing ethnic minority congregations, have 
a first look at establishing a United 
Methodist related-university in Africa, 
and try to complete work of the legisla- 
tive committees. Some of the latter ses- 
sions are likely to extend well into Satur- 
day night. 

Sunday morning, delegates will have 
an opportunity to hear bishops, clergy, 
and lay delegates who will be preaching 
in almost 60 St. Louis-area churches. A 
complete listing is available in the DCA 
(pg. 140) and on the message board out- 
side the plenary hall. 



P Agenda 

Saturday, April 30 

8:30 a.m. Worship 
9:00 a.m. Missional Priorities/ 
Conutiission on 
Religion and Race: 
Special Report 
9:20 a.m. Cfourtesies 
9:25 a.m. Calendar Items 

Consent Calendar #1 
Africa Initiative 
11:00 a.mA£;enda Report 

Presiding Bishop Report 
AnnoQDcements 
Adjourn to Legis^ 
lative Sessions 
12:30 p.m. Lunch 
2:30-5:00 p.m. Legislative 

Committees 
7:30 p.m. Legislative 
CommitteeB 



r 



I 




Woodring 

displays 

the bug 

causing 

voting 

snafu. 



Also on Sunday will be two performan- 
ces of the host Missouri Area production, 
"Through Church Windows." The 90- 
minute original musical drama, written, 
produced and directed by faculty and stu- 
dents from Central Methodist College in 
Fayette, Mo., looks at the past, present, 
and future of Methodism. 

Friday, during a brief business session, 
the conference set a special order for 
Saturday to hear the report from the 
legislative committee considering the 
"Africa Initiative," the formal name for 
the university project. The committee 
endorsed the program. 

In another action related to Africa, the 
delegates approved increasing the num- 
ber of active bishops in Africa from seven 
to eight. The proposal noted that there 
has been "significant numerical growth" 
in United Methodism in Africa in the 
past few years. 

On another question relateii to central 
conferences, the delegates rejected a 
proposal to put a limit on the number of 
years a bishop could serve in a particular 



John Goodwin 



area. In the United States, bishops nor- 
mally serve only eight years in an area. 

In a light-hearted moment Friday, De- 
Wayne Woodring, conference business 
manager, displayed the "bug" reported to 
have fouled the new electronic voting 
system when it was tested on opening 
day. A new test proved successful, and 
the system was used the rest of the morn- 
ing to give instantaneous results on the 
first dozen of what eventually may total 
upwards of 1,500 calendar items. 

In a "statement of concern" released 
Friday, bishops of the church said that it 
is time for new initiatives to resolve the 
Middle East conflict. Israel, the church's 
chief pastors said, is in a position to 
make the "first generous move. 

"It is time," the 62 active bishops as- 
serted, for "peace and justice to 
embrace." Basing their concern on the 
biblical call for peace, the bishops said 
the Middle East, as one of the cradles of 
the world's great religions, "cries out for 
a resolution of its conflicts in the spirit 
of God's peace and justice." 
-Robert Lear 



138 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 







m 


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9 




• c 


^ ^ 


\ 




r 


vv 







'Shared Journey' 



"Shared Journey," a choir of clergywomen from the Baltimore Annual 
Conference, will be participating in today's worship. The clergywomen 
have been gathering together for community, support, and spiritual nur- 
ture, for several years. While away on retreat, the women realized that 
their bonding and support became more vital and strong as they sang. 
Because of that experience, they committed themselves to meet month- 
ly. Two of the women, Jan Powers Miller and Susan R. Beehler, have 



written songs that chronicle the personal, spiritual, and corporate lives 
shared at their meetings. 

The group has participated in many worship services that include their 
original liturgies, prayers, dances, and songs. The 25 women who 
gather represent a small group of the over 1 50 clergywomen in the Bal- 
timore Annual Conference. 



Worship Leaders from Zaire, Pennsylvania Close First Week of Assembly 



Bishop Fama Onema and the Rev. 
Theodore W. Loder will lead worship as 
the first week of General Conference 
draws to a close. 

Preaching at 8:30 a.m. in Cervantes 
Convention Center will be Bishop 
Onema. He has been episcopal leader of 
the Central Zaire Area since his 1972 
election to the episcopacy. 

Bishop Onema served as a village pas- 
tor, professor in the theological school, 
director of the Pastors' School and 
statistician. He was conference secretary 
when he was elected bishop. 



Bishop Onema and his wife, Ekoko, 
have seven children. 

Liturgist this morning will be Bishop 
Thomas S. Bangura, episcopal leader of 
the United Methodists in Sierra Leone. 

Dr. Loder wDl preach at 2:30 p.m. 
today at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, 
one block west of the convention center 
on 7th Street. 

Dr. Loder is senior pastor of First 
United Methodist Church, German- 
town, Penn., an appointment he has 
held for 25 years. The congregation was 
among the first to declare itself a 



"sanctuary church" for Central and 
South American refugees. 

A preacher and teacher in a number of 
local church, annual conference and col- 
lege settings. Dr. Loder preached at the 
public sanctuaiy service for the Nation- 
al Conference in Impact in 1986. He was 
the co-leader with the Rev. Daniel Ber- 
rigan of a seminar on prophetic minis- 
try. 

He received his divinity degree from 
Yale Divinity School and earned a doctor 
of philosophy degree in contemporary 
theology. 



^^NL co^ Daily Christian Advcx:ate 




Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference of 
the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 

published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist Publishing 
House, P.O. Box 801, Nashville, TN 
37202. 



Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
Display in Civic Center Exhibition Hall. 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Bette Prestwood Associate Editor 

Sheila W. McG«e Managing Editor 

Andrew Miller Business Manager 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Meredith Danafaer Calendar & Proceedings Editor 

Richard Street Composition Manager 

News 4 Features 

Mike Cunningham Composition Manager 

Calendar & Proceedings 

Barbara J. Wynn Assistant ComposiUoo Manager 

James Steele News/Roundup Manager 

Kathy Kruger Assistsnt News Editor 

CrysZinkiewira Chief Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg AasistAnt Copy Editor 

Cindy Solomon Assistant Copy Editor 

Louise McEowen Assistant Copy Editor 

Jane M. Schwarz Assistant Copy Editor 

Vivian Mitchell Secretarial Pool Manager 

Angela R. Butler Secretary 

Mochell Anderson Secretary 



Bradford L. MotU Feature Editor 

Glenn Hinton Index Editor 

Thelma Boeder .Assistant Index Editor 

John Goodwin Photographer 

JuanitaBellenfant Sales Manager 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Joyce Wolf Circulation Manager 

RobertK Feaster Publisher 



Subscriptions: Daily Reports (binder included) 
$34.50 if picked up at the DCA booth (final issues 
mailed Ist class); $57.50 mailed daily from St. Louis 
by 1st class mail; $46.00 mailed after General Con- 
ference. Individual copies $3.00 each at DCA booth. 
Roundup Editioa (one copy included in Daily 
Reports Bubscription),ten or more to one address, 
$1 each; Single copies, $2 each. Sets mailed after 
Conference: Advance Editions Workbook, $17.60; 
Bound Volume*: Advance Editions Workbook and 
Daily Reports, $ 126 a set (mailed in August). 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



139 



Area night musical 



^Through Church Windows' Looks to 
Past, Present, Future of Methodism 



The production is the work of Central 
Methodist College English professor 

Delegates and others involved in the 
intensive labors of General Conference 
can look forward to a welcome mid-way 
break tomorrow. 

The host Missoiiri Area will be "pulling 
out all the stops" with two performances 
of an original musical drama, "Through 
Church Windows." 

The 90-minute production has been 
written, produced, and directed entirely 
by faculty and others from Central 
Methodist College (CMC). CMC is lo- 
cated in the central Missouri commimity 
of Fayette. 

"From beginning 
to end, this is essen- 
tial Methodism- 
past, present, and 
future," comments 
Dr. Donald Eidson, 
who has written the 
lyrics. "The whole 
message is there as 
a way of searching 
the meaning of United Methodism 
through the principal characters of 
tradition, reason, experience, Scripture, 
and vision," he added. 

Eidson, producer for "Windows," is 
professor of English at CMC and the 
school's associate dean. 

According to Eidson, five allegorical 
characters travel freely in time, peering 
through church windows in eighteenth 
century England, in the contemporary 
United States, and on an Aldersgate 
celebration in 2038. 




Following the dose of business Satur- 
day, the troupe wOl transform the Cer- 
vantes Convention Center stage for the 
production, which will include a 260- 
voice choir from various choirs 
throughout the Missouri Area. 

The show will include 24 characters 
ranging from a 7-year-old child to adults, 
plus a 16-piece orchestra drawn from the 
college's pool of musical talent. Of the 
five leading parts, three will be played by 
professionals. 

While the five allegorical characters 
search for truth and meaning, there are 
some lighter moments including a duet 
between women in the futuristic seg- 
ment, commenting on "Committees." 

The first scene in the musical is the 
Foimdiy, an old London cannon factory 
where John Wesley met with a group of 
early followers. Principal characters are 
an Anglican priest from Bristol who had 
been fascinated by Wesley's open-air 
preaching; an unidentified nobleman; 
the historical character Peter Bohler, 
who did much to influence Wesley's 
theology and practices; and finally a 
cameo appearance by Wesley himself. 

Scene two, in contemporary times, is 
in a "generic" United Methodist church 
during the children's sermon, with a 
three-part "musical argument" between 
the five characters, some chOdren, and a 
group of adults. 

The third scene is set in the London of 
2038 for the 300th anniversary of 
Wesley's Aldersgate experience. 

Paul Drummond, director of choral ac- 
tivities at Central and the show's musi- 
cal director, has written original music 
including the title song. Another selec- 



tion, "Vision," has original lyrics set to 
the hymn tune "Be Thou My Vision." 
Faculty member Ronald Anson did the 
musical arrangements, and Kenneth 
Bryant of the theater department 
designed sets and is the stage director. 

The show's executive producer is Joe 
A. Howell, CMC's president since 1977. 
The school is known for its Swinney 
Conservatory of Music, which has 
trained many church and school 
musicians throughout Missouri and 
beyond. 

Audition tapes for major roles and for 
the choir were solicited from churches 
throughout the state, plus in-person 
auditions for CMC students. 

This is the third such production Eid- 
son has written and produced. His first, 
"Some Trust in Chariots," was written 
for the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976 and 
performed widely across Missouri. The 
second, "Mysterious Ways," was 
produced in 1984 for the Bicentennial of 
Methodism in America. 
-James H. Steele 



Time and Ticket Information 

General public-B p.m. 
Delegates/Ofricials~7:30 p.m. 

Tickets have been furnished in 

delegates' packets. 

Additional tickets are avaOable for 

a $5 donation at the ticket booth in 

the Sheraton Hotel across from the 

Convention Center 

Times --Today: 11 a.m - 2 p.m., and 

4-7 p.m.; Sun.: noon - 3 p.m. 



For Deiegates 

When you speak to the conference-- 

1. Stand at your seat and hold up your placard provided for 
that purpose. 

2. Stay in your place until the chair recognizes you. 

3. Go to the nearest aisle microphone as soon as you are 
recognized 

4. Step up to where you can speak directly into the 
microphone. 

5. Announce your name and annual conference first and let 
the chair repeat them before you proceed (See Rule Six) 



When you make a motion- 

1. Write out your amendment or other proposal on a mo- 
tion pad. 

2. Sign your name and annual conference. 

3. As soon as you finish reading your motion into the 
microphone, hand it to a page to deliver to the document 
secretary. 

4. If amending printed material, indicate exactly where the 
change belongs-what words come out and what words are 
added (See Rule 32). 



140 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Guest Speakers for General Conference 

A good number of guest speakers will be filling pulpits in Southern Illinois 
and Missouri East Conference churches during General Conference. Follow- 
ing are the assignments as reported to or arranged by the Local Committee: 

Sunday, May 1 



Speaker 

Illinois Churches 



Host Church and Pastor 



Host Church and Pastor 



Missouri Churches 



Don Mendenhsll Bethalto (L«wrenc« E. Becker) 

SUn England Irt UMC, Wood River (Glenn Creek) 

Philip Wogamiui Metropolitan UMC, Alton (John E. Sims) 

Willimn R. Key Caseyville UMC (K. Bruce Rushing) 

June Parker Goldman Grace-Prospect Park, Washington Park and 

Fairview Heights (L. C. Pruehsner) 

Vernon Bigler First UMC, Marissa (Glen E. Roeborough) 

Wallace Chappell Nameoki UMC, Granite City (Jerry L. Reed) 

10:45 am. 1900 Pontoon Rd. 
•Mary Austin Aldersgate Community UMC, East St Louis 

(Lisa M. Joiner) 

10:45 am. 715 N. 80th 
Bishop J. W. Hardt Christ UMC, Fairview HeighU (B. R 

Cummins) 
Sharon Rhoncmus First UMC, Lebanon (John Grob) 

First UMC, East Alton (Dean Blackburn) 
•Bishop L. Bevel Jones Wesley Bethel UMC, East St. Louis 

(Roderick McLean) 
Vernie T. Barnett Niedringhaus, Granite City (Ralph Totten) 

8:30 & 10:30 am. 20th & Delmar 

•Bishop Joe Yeakel Union, Belleville (William LewU) 

Walter Zabel Immanuel, EdwardsviUe (EUis Dagger) 

Bishop Richard Wilke lat UMC, East Alton (Dean Blackburn) 

Missouri Churches 

Harold Battiste, Jr Fenton (Nick K. Kiriakos) 

8:30 & 10:45 am. 800 Granois 

•Jim Beal Kingshighway, SL Louis (Richard White) 

9:45 a.m. 900 Bellerive Blvd. 

Bishop Monk Bryan Concord Trinity, St. Louis (Jack L. 

9:30 & 1 1 am. 5275 South Lindbergh 

•Donald L. Carver — Scruggs Memorial 9 am. 3846 Fairvew 

Christy Memorial 11 am. 4601 Morganford 

St Louis (Jean B. Scott) 
BileyCiM „... Elliaville (John Ray) 

8:30 and 10:30 a.m. 1355 Clayton Rd. 
•Bishop Roy C. Clark St John's, St Louis (Willard Spencer) 

5000 Washington 
•Bishop Roy Nichols Cabanne, St Louis (John N. Doggett, Jr.) 

10:45 a.m. 5760 Bartmer Ave. 
Bishop R. Kern Eutsler Stephan Memorial, St LouU (John H. 

Millsaps, Jr.) 

8:15 4 10:50 am. 2730 Walton Rd. 63114 
GeneFruer Bonne-Terre-Marvin Chapel (Robert 

Hemmeria) 
Bishop William B. Grove Kirkwood UMC (Marvin Pyron) 

8:30 & 1 1 am. 201 West Adams 
Bishop J. Woodrow Hearn New Hope, Arnold (Howard Hardeman) 

8:15 & 10:45 a.m. 3921 Jeffco Blvd. 

John P. Hanson Brasher Ct (Glen Lochhead) 

Harold G. Hunter Mt Auburn-Wesley. St Louis (Myrtle 

Schroeder) 

10:45 am. 8841 Lucas Hunt 
Thomas K. Kim College UMC, Warrenton (David Richardson) 

10:30 am. 701 East Main 
Adam Kuczma Maplewood UMC (Jane Clark) 

10:40 am. 7409 Flora 



Bishop Arthur Kulah First UMC, St Charles (R. Paul MetcalO 

8:15 & 10:45 am. 801 First Capital 
Kent Millard Faith, St Charles (Gary MetcalD 

8:30 & 1 1 am. 2950 Droste Rd. 
FritI Mutti Zion, St Louis (Robert Gail Woods) 

9:30 & 10:45 am. 1603 Unio Rd. 
Saranne P. ODonnell St Andrews, Florissant (Philip Niblack) 

8:30 t 1 1 am. 3975 No. Hi. 67 
William B. Odcn Williams Memorial, O'Fallon (Richard L. 

Combe) 

8:30 & 11 am. 307 Pittman 

Tal Oden Centenary, Louisiana (George Braden) 

•William K Quick Lafayette Park, St Louis (Diana Loomis) 

10:45 am. 2300 Layfayette 
•Bishop Louis Schowengerdt University, St Louis (Bruce Davis) 

10:30 am. 6901 Washington 
Tei Sample Church of the Shepherd, St Charles 

(David G. Bennett) 

8:15 4 10:30 am. 4116McClay 
Richard A Thornburg St Clair (JeffryC. Spaulding) 

10:45 am. 485 3. Main 

Ernest J. Wendell Whitewater-Advance (Hubert Roberson) 

Bishop C. Dale White Salem, Ballwin (Kelly Holt) 

8:15 & 10:30 am. 14825 Manchester 
Charles D. Whittle Wesley, Jefferson City (Geoffrey 

Posegate) 
•Bishop Eugene M. Frank Grace, St Louis (Larry Gallamore) 

11am. 6199 Waterman 
John Martin Bellefontaine, St Louis (Alfred 

Mitchener) 

8:30 & 11 am. 10600 Bellefontaine 
•Bishop James S. Thomas Union Memorial, St Louis (J. LaVon 

Kincaid, Sr.) 

10:30 am. 1141 Belt 
Barbara Blackstone Smith Chapel-Central Grove (Kenneth 

Johnson) 

Victor Goldachmidt Belgrade-Bismarck (Robert Bullock) 

•William Jacoha Immanuel, St Louis (Robert Moger) 

10:45 a.m. 2105 McCausland 
Delton Krueger Elsberry-Smith Chapel (Terry Gallamore) 

10:45 a.m. 
P. Boyd Mather United Methodist Church of Green Trails, 

Chesterfield (Kenneth W. Gottman) 

8:30* 11 am. 14237 Ladue 
William A. McCartney Manchester UMC (John W. Ward, Jr.) 

8:15,9:30* 11 am. 129 Woodsmill Rd. 
Evelyn Laycock Gray Summit-Labadie (Barry Woodward) 

Gray Summit 8:30 am. 

Labadie 10 am. 

Bradford and Ford Streets 
•Moujon Biggs Fry Memorial-Shaw Avenue (Keith Morgan) 

Fry Memorial 9:30 am. 2501 Clifton 

Shaw Avenue 11 am. 4265 Shaw 
•Major J Jones SamariUn (Michele Sue Shumate) 

11 am. 4234 Washington 

• Churches located within five miles of the Cervantes Convention Center. 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



141 



Attention Tram Riders 

All tickets to ride the trams to and 
from your hotel must be purchased at 
the front desk of the Convention Center 
before boarding. Tickets are $1 each 
ride or $5 for unlimited boarding 
through May 6. 

••• 

Dallas-Ft. Worth Area is honoring 
Bishop John Russell and Mrs. Mary Jean 
Russell with a dinner Thursday, May 6, 
6 p.m., at Miss Hullings, 11th and 
Locust. All delegates and visitors from 
this area are encouraged to attend. For 
detfdls, see Homer Kluck, Spurgeon 
Dunnam or Margaret Tarr. 



Announcements 

The Boston Area delegation and 
others from the Maine, New Hampshire, 
and Southern New England conferences 
will meet on Wednesday, May 4 at 5:45 
p.m. for dinner at the Radisson Hotel, 
Delta Room. Bishop George W. Bashore 
will be the honored guest. Reservations 
may be made by Monday noon with 
Richard Evans, Room 1206, Days Inn at 
the Arch. 

Delegates and members of West Ohio 
Conference will hold a dinner May 2 at 6 
p.m. in honor of Bishop Edsel A Am- 



St. Louis Radio and Television 
Stations Feature United 
Methodists 

Jane Hull Harvey and Peggy Halsey 
will discuss sexual harassment on "Sun- 
day Morning Live," May 1, 9-10 a.m., 
KMJM-MAJIC FM 108. Ms. Harvey is 
program coordinator for the Board of 
Church and Society (BCS) in 
Washington, D.C. Ms. Halsey is execu- 
tive director of the Office of Ministries 
with Women in Crisis for the Board of 
Global Ministries in New York City. 

Homelessness and fair housing will be 
the issues discussed when the Rev. Harry 
Smith and Dr. Beverly Jackson are fea- 
tured on "Open Line" on KSLH~91.5 FM 
at 12 noon on Monday, May 2. Mr. Smith 



is the executive director of Metro Mini- 
stry in St. Louis. His unit works with the 
homeless. Dr. Jackson directs the BCS 
department of human welfare. 

Programs announced earlier are: 

Bishop Woodie W. White on AIDS, 
"East Side, West Side," KDNL TV, Chan- 
nel 30, Saturday, April 30, 6:30 a.m, and 
Sunday, May 1, 6 a.m. 

Dr. C. R. Hager on aging, Rev. Jean B. 
Scott on homelessness, Bishop Melvin G. 
Talbert on racism, "Dialogue," WIL, 1430 
AM, Sunday, May 1, 6 a.ni. 

Pauline Niles, Missouri East delegate 
presenting an overview of General Con- 
ference, "Close Up," KEZK, 102 FM, 6:30 
a.m., and WRTH, 590 AM, 6 a.m., Sun- 
day, May 1. 



Just 80 Years Ago. . . 

Each General Conference has its issues 
that leave definite impressions. The ex- 
perience of this General Conference ses- 
sion may not be that different from what 
the delegates experienced at the 1904 
General Conference, 80 years ago. Here 
are some comments that appeared in the 
Daily Christian Advocate following the 
1904 General Conference of The 
Methodist Episcopal Church: 

"...At the opening of the conference 
there were grave apprehensions on the 
part of many thoroughly devout people 
lest some grievous blimders should be 
made in the decisions of the conference. 
It is doubtful if anything performed by 
the General Conferences in the last half 
centuiy has created a greater commotion 
than the Report of the Committee on 
Episcopacy proposing to retire five of the 
general superintendents at once.. .but it 
was handled with such deftness and such 
good sense and sobriety, and every ut- 
terance was made with such careful 
selection of terms and weighing of words 



that the delicate task was performed 
with the least possible friction and left 
the smallest occasion for heart bum- 
mgs...." 

"Altogether the conference has been 
one of the greatest that the Church has 
ever known. It is understood that Bishop 
[Stephen M.] Merrill says that this is the 
greatest conference ever held by the 
Methodist Episcopal Church " 

Looking back on it, there were sig- 
nificant actions taken: 

1. Agreed to sponsor a common hym- 
nal, catechism, and order of worship 
with the M.E. Church, South, and to in- 
vite the A.M.E. Church, A.M.E. Zion 
Church, and C.M.E. Church to join in 
this common venture. 

2. Sought close relations between the 
M.E. Church and M.E. Church South, 
and to explore the general issue of a 
federation of churches. This action led 
eventually to the formation of the 
Federation Council of Churches. 

3. Adopted a new constitution, which 
annual conferences had approved in the 
preceding four years. 

-Walter N. Vemon 



The Western North Carolina Con- 
ference delegation luncheon with Bishop 
and Mrs. Bevel Jones will be held on 
Tuesday, May 3 at 12:30 p.m. at the 
Media Club, 30th floor, Laclede Gas 
Building, 720 Olive St. Reservations may 
be made with Joetta Rinehart or Thomas 
B. Stockton. 

Delegates and friends of the Kansas 
Area will gather following evening ad- 
journment on Monday, May 2 in the Gal- 
lery Room, Days Inn at the Arch, for a 
reception honoring Bishop and Mrs. 
Kenneth Hicks. 

Reminder to invited guests: 

Black United Methodist district 
superintendents' breakfast honoring 
Bishops Leontine Kelly and James 
Thomas, Sunday, May 1, 7 a.m., 
Sheraton Hotel, Boulevard Room. 

MARCHA (Methodists Associated 
Representing the Cause of Hispanic 
Americans) will hold a banquet May 1 at 
6 p.m. in the West Ballroom, Sheraton 
Hotel. The National Convocation Plan 
for Hispanic Ministry will be high- 
lighted. Tickets were sold in advance, 
but everyone is invited to attend the 
program after dinner. 

All are welcome to a worship service of 
celebration and baptismal renewal Sun- 
day, May 1 at 9:45 a.m. in Room 130 of 
the Convention Center. The Baltimore 
clergywomen will sing. Sponsored by the 
General Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women. 

A video "Casting out Fear: Reconciling 
Ministries with Gay/Lesbian United 
Methodists," will be shown today, 12:15 
to 1 p.m.. Room 270, Convention Center. 

Chairs of legislative committees: When 
you have finished your work, pick up 
your last batch of completed Legislative 
Committee Reports in Room 111. 

Delegates and friends of the Wisconsin 
Conference will meet Wednesday, May 4 
at 5:30 p.m. for a dinner at the Sheraton 
Hotel, Robert E. Lee Room. Paid reser- 
vations must be given to Phyllis 
Rodriguez. Honored guests will be 
Bishop and Mrs. David Lawson and 
retired Bishop and Mrs. Ralph Alton. 

Worship Services Available On Tape: 
Requests for copies of the bishops' ser- 
mons have poured in. Audio and video 
tapes of all morning worship services are 
available, (audiotapes, $7; videotapes, 
$25). 



142 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Judicial CouncU Adapts Guides for Appearances 



Years of Tradition, Months of 
Planning Go Into Seating Order 



The following rules were adopted by 
the Judicial Council on Friday, April 29, 

Rules For Parties Appearing 
Before The Judicial Council 

The Judicial Council is the Ecclesiasti- 
cal Court of The United Methodist 
Church. The Council realizes that many 
persons appearing before the Judicial 
Council or having cases before the Judi- 
cial Council are not learned in legal pro- 
cedures, which for that matter vary from 
state to state. We, therefore, make these 
suggestions £ind rules. 
LPreparation of Briefs 
Briefs may be printed, typewritten, or 
produced by any copying or duplicating 
process which produces a clear black 
image on lettersize white paper, using 
only one side of each page. The tejrt 
should be double-spaced except for mat- 
ters which are customarily single- 
spaced. The pages in the briefs should 
be nimibered consecutively. 

ILThe Brief of the Petitioner to 
the Judicial Council 

The petitioner's brief should set forth 
the jurisdiction of the Judicial Council 
together with a succinct statement of the 
provisions of the Constitution or Dis- 
cipline of The United Methodist 
Church relied upon with corresponding 
citations of previous Judicial Coimcil 
decisions. It is veiy important that the 
dLsciplinary issue be stated over and 
above any documents submitted to the 
Judicial Council to decline jurisdiction. 
mAU Briefs 

All briefs should also contain a concise 
statement of the facts and issues includ- 
ing a resume of all actions of lower dis- 
ciplinary courts with a statement of any 
errors relied upon, giving accurate cita- 
tions of the pages of the record and the 
authority cited and a short conclusion 
stating the precise relief sought. Failure 



to do so may delay consideration of the 
matter by the Judicial Council. 

Ten copies of the brief should be sub- 
mitted to the Secretary of the Council. 

The language used in the brief and in 
other communications to the Council 
shall be courteous, free from vile, 
obscene, obnoxious, or offensive expres- 
sions, and free from insulting, abusive, 
discourteous, or irrelevant criticism of 
any person, class of persons or associa- 
tions of persons, or any official of the 
church or officer thereof, or of any in- 
stitution. Any violation of this rule shall 
subject the author to having the material 
returned and the refusal of the Judicial 
Council to consider the matter. 

All briefs shall be filed not later than 
45 calendar days after the filing of the 
matter before the Judicial Council. 
IV.Oral Arguments 
All cases are submitted to the Judicial 
Council for decision without oral argu- 
ment, unless a written request for per- 
mission to argue orally is filed with the 
Secretary of the Council, and permission 
is granted by the President. When per- 
mission for oral argument has been 
granted to one party the right to oral ar- 
gument extends to all parties, unless the 
r^ht to argue orally has been forfeited. 
Oral argument shall be confined to the 
time allowed by the President of the 
Council. 

In oral argument the same informa- 
tion should be provided to the Judicial 
Council as called for in the briefs. 
However, parties should be cautioned 
that they should not read their briefs to 
the Judicial Council. The members of the 
Council are literate and will have read 
the briefs. Parties are cautioned best to 
use time by succinctly stating the 
primary issues that they wish to call to 
the attention of the Judicial Council. 



"Catch the Spirit' Update 

A daUy 15-minute TV report on 

the General Conference 

6:30 - 7:30 a.m. 

Radisson Hotel-Ch 8 

Holiday Inn-Ch 8 

Sherton Hotel-Ch 8 

Days Inn-Ch 12 

Repeated four times within the hour 

each day except Simday. 



The communion offering taken 
on Tuesday was $9,521.46 for 
Mozambiciue Relief (Advance Spe- 
cial). 




Episcopal and Lay 
Addresses Available 
on Audiotape. 

Order at Booth 
outside UM Publishing 
House Display. 



Row on row of blue chairs and tables in 
the Cervantes plenary hall provide an or- 
derly settmg for the General Conference 
to do its business, but behind the order 
are countless hours of planning and 
chart-drawing with a fedora thrown in to 
arrive at the seating arrangement. 

Traditionally, bishops of The United 
Methodist Church and the Judicial j 
Council are seated on the platform, along I 
with the secretarial staff, editor of the 1 
Daily Christian Advocate, and members 
of the Committee on Correlation and 
Editorial Revision. Special space has to 
be provided for the presiding officer and 
people speaking from the platform. 

Priority on the floor goes to voting 
delegates from United Methodist annual, 
missionary, and provisional conferences 
in the United States, Puerto Rico, Africa, 
Europe, and the Philippines; and three 
autonomous churches with which 
United Methodism has concordat 
relationships-Caribbean and the 
Americas, Great Britain, and Mexico. 

Once the number of delegates has been 
determined, the drawing of the actual 
floor plan begins. A random drawing is 
conducted about 18 months ahead of the 
session to determine location of the 
various delegations. 

For 1988, Mexico, Hungary, Denmark, 
and the German Democratic Republic 
were drawn first from the hat. Other in- 
ternational delegates near the front of 
the hall include those from Sweden, Fin- 
land, the Federal Republic of Germany, 
and the Philippines. 

After seats have been provided for 
voting delegates, then provisions must be 
made for nonvoting representatives of 
autonomous churches affiliated with The 
United Methodist Church, and general 
secretaries of denominational agencies. 
Once all these groups have been assigned 
space, attention then is turned to news 
media, spouses of bishops, the Judicial 
Council, reserve delegates, and visiting 
dignitaries such as ecumenical repre- 
sentatives. Choirs and other musical 
groups also must be fitted in, and special 
attention provided for persons with 
handicaps. 

Cervantes provides space for about 
4,000 visitors, in addition to the 996 
voting delegates, 200 news media repre- 
sentatives, and hundreds of reserve 
delegates, spouses and dignitaries.Now, 
mused Dr. Woodring, "if only all these 
could have a front row seat with a good 
view of the large screens and clear sound 
from the public address system...." 
-Robert Lear 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



143 



Legislative Committees at Work 

The following brief reports are compiled by the staffs of United 
Methodist Communications and the Daily Christian Advocate. 
They do not represent official reports of the committees. 



Church and Society 

Recommended to the plenary for 
approval: 

•A Revised Social Principles 
paragraph on human sexuality (Para. 
7 IF) retaining the words, "though we do 
not condone homosexuality.. .and con- 
sider the practice incompatible...." A 
minority report would eliminate those 
words (63 for, 32 against, 1 abstention); 
♦Retaining the present Social Prin- 
ciples statement on abortion with the ad- 
dition of the sentence, "We cannot affirm 
abortion as an acceptable means of birth 
control (94-1-6); 

•"In Support of Self-Determination 
and Non-intervention" recognizing "that 
in rare instances intervention could be 
justified," designating eight standards, 
and prohibiting covert action or use of 
nuclear weapons (57-38-3); 

♦Endorsing and recommending 
cooperation in Project Equality; 

•Amending the Social Principles 
paragraph on "Rights of Women" to show 
support for affirmative action efforts; 

*A study on homosexuality to begin 
immediately after General Conference, 
conducted by the General Coimcil on 
Ministries using as consultants repre- 
sentatives of msgor points of view on 
homosexuality; 

*A resolution affirming a diversity of 
language usage in the U.S. and opposing 
a constitutional amendment making 
English the official language; 

*A change of the word "Father" to 
"Creator" in the preamble to the Social 
Principles; 

*A petition to retain imchanged "Our 
Social Creed" in the Social Principles 
(Conmiittee voted nonconcurrence on a 
number of petitions requesting changes 
in "Our Social Creed"); 

*The report from the Infant Formula 
Task Force of the General Board of 
Church and Society (GBCS); 

*A petition highlighting the "close" 
relationship between the General Com- 
mission on Religion and Race and GBCS 
as they lead denominational efforts for 
racial and social justice; 

*A designation of GBCS participation 
in the Joint Committee on Stewardship. 



Concurred with: 

•Petition on Affirmative Action that 
would revise present resolution in the 
Book of Resolutions (89-0-1); 

•Petition condemning sexual harass- 
ment in church and society in the USA 
and calling the church to model an en- 
vironment of "welcome, respect and 
equality (91-1-1); 

Nonconcurred with:. 

•A number of petitions to alter the 
present resolution on responsible paren- 
thood in the Book of Resolutions. A 
minority report suggests significant 
changes as suggested in the petitions (79- 
16-1); 

•A request to change the name 
"Church and Society" to "Church in 
Society." 

Referred back to the subcommittee:, 

•The petition on "Peace, Justice and 
the Reunification of Korea" for further 
discussion; 

•The report on economic boycotts, to 
complete discussion on how the church 
should utilize the boycott guidelines. 

-Helen Chang and Lee Ranch 

Conferences 

Concurred with: 

•A petition to make explicit the minis- 
try of the laity both within the congrega- 
tion and in the home, workplace, com- 
munity and world; consolidated descrip- 
tion of responsibilities of conference lay 
leader; 

•A petition to permit election of as- 
sociate conference lay leader; 

•A petition further clarifying that an 
annual conference "Cannot financially 
obligate any organizational unit of The 
United Methodist Church except the An- 
nual Conference itself;" 

•A petition adding a new sub- 
paragraph to Para. 705 detailing 
methods for gathering and protecting 
records of candidates and ministerial 
personnel; 

•A petition permitting but not man- 
dating establishment of an annual con- 
ference Committee on Ministry to Per- 
sons with Handicapping Conditions. 

Nonconcurred with:, 

•Several petitions designed to limit 
consideration of controversial items by 
the General Conference; 

•Petitions to allow lay members to 
vote on ministerial matters; 



Recommended the plenary agree: 

•To allow a moment of silence at this 
(Jeneral Conference to celebrate 100 
years of the deaconess movement and to 
send greetings from the General Con- 
ference to the national meeting of deaco- 
nesses and home missionaries in August; 

Recommended the plenary refuse: 

•To allow election of lay and clergy 
delegates to General Conference by 
plurality on one ballot for each class; 

•To allow lay and clergy members to 
vote for all General Conference 
delegates rather than by class; 

•To mandate secretary of General 
Conference convene one meeting per 
quadrennium with secretaries of juris- 
dictional conferences for orientation 
and coordination; 

•To add coordinators of scouting to 
district or conference structure; 

•To add district presidents of United 
Methodist Women and United 
Methodist Men to annual conference 
membership. 

•To add a paid General Conference 
petitions secretary. 

-Ann Whiting and Darrell Shamblin, 

Faith and Mission 

•Expressed satisfaction with a col- 
legial spirit in the work of the commit- 
tee and supported continued effort to 
achieve significant consensus before 
taking the proposed new statement of 
"Our Theological Task" to the plenary; 

•Completed paragraph -by-paragraph 
work on the report of Commission on 
Doctrinal Standards and Our Theologi- 
cal Task and agreed to a final overview 
of the entire document; 

•Expressed agreement that "like 
Scripture these (tradition, experience 
and reason) may become creative 
vehicles of the Holy Spirit, as they func- 
tion within the church. They quicken 
our faith, open our eyes to the wonder of 
God's love and clarify our under- 
standing." 

•Agreed to fmalize Friday night lan- 
guage on the role of Scripture and the in- 
teraction of Scripture with experience, 
tradition and reason. 

-Dana Jones and Richard Thornburg 



144 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



General Administration 

Affirme± 

*The proposed 1989-92 quadrennial 
theme, "Celebrate God's Grace: Witness 
for Jesus Christ" with suggestions for 
witness and action by congregations, an- 
nual conferences, the Council of Bishops 
and general agencies. Reordered some 
paragraphs to give peace with justice a 
higher priority. 

•The report of the Study of the Con- 
nectional Principles. 

Concurred with: 

•A petition requesting that there be no 
missional priority for 1989-1992; 

*The report on developing congrega- 
tions for deaf ministry; 

*The report from the Council of 
Bishops committee to coordinate the 
goal to increase membership; 

*The report on the Baltimore Declara- 
tion; 

*The report on Prison Mini- 
stries/Prison Reform which includes six 
recommendations, including the estab- 
lishment of a conference committee on 
prison ministries through the con- 
ference council on ministries, leadership 
by the Council of Bishops, local church 
study on biblical and theological issues 
related to the criminal justice system and 
that bishops, district superintendents 
and the director of the conference coun- 
cil on ministries visit at least one prison 
annually and report on the significance 
of prison and jail ministries to the clergy 
and laity; 

*The report of the Advisory Commit- 
tee on Stewardship after removing 
recommendations calling for a budget in- 
crease for the Section on Stewardship of 
the General Board of Discipleship of 
$791,000 for the quadrennium; adopted 
an amendment mandating the Section 
on Stewardship of the Board of Global 
Ministries to coordinate the work of the 
Joint Committee on Stewardship to 
develop and promote a holistic 
stewardship program; 

*The report on the Advance for Christ 
and His Church; 

•A petition asking the full title of The 
Advance "for Christ and His church" be 
printed in the Book of Discipline. 

-Robert F. Story 

Global Ministries 

Recommended to the plenary for ap- 
proval 

•Deleting Para. 146 which says the 
United Methodist Association of Health 
and Welfare Ministries may be organized 
and replacing it with an amplified 
paragraph allowing organization of the 
association but adding that it is "an af- 
filiate group" and "is not owned or con- 



trolled by the General Board of Global 
Ministries (GBGM) or its divisions or 
departments." (The new wording was 
approved 50-46 on the third ballot.) 

*A proposal directing GBGM to 
develop a comprehensive plan for Native 
American ministries with two foci: al- 
cohol and drug abuse and life-threaten- 
ing diseases and ministries that include 
tribal sovereignty. Plan is to be 
developed in consultation with the Na- 
tive American International Caucus 
(NAIC) and the Oklahoma Indian Mis- 
sionary Conference (OIMC), imple- 
mented during the quadrennium as 
feasible and reported in full to the 1992 
General Conference; 

*A petition requesting GBGM to 
develop a comprehensive study of the use 
of Native American lands by the church; 

*A petition that an annual conference 
coordinator for volunteers in mission 
"may be" elected annually and a related 
proposal afTirming volunteers in mis- 
sion. 

Nonconcurred with: 

•Several petitions asking for changes 
in the structure of the Women's Division 
of the General Board of Global Mini- 
stries, including one to replace the 
present Women's Division with a laity 
division incorporating both United 
Methodist Women and United 
Methodist Men; 

•A proposal for district boards of 
global ministries; 

•Proposals mandating a continuation 
of the dialogue between the Mission 
Society for United Methodists and 
GBGM and adopted, instead, a motion 
expressing appreciation for the progress 
made in the dialogue and that the Mis- 
sion Society, BGM and the Council of 
Bishops "be urged to find ways" to con- 
tinue the dialogue; 

•Proposals that the mission society be 
affirmed as a sending society by the 
church. 

Referred- 

•To the Council of Bishops a petition 
asking the General Conference to ask 
forgiveness for oppression of Native 
American people. 

—Betty Thompson and Charles Cole 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Recommended to the plenary for ap- 
proval 

•A petition for financial support 
through the Black College Fund for 
Black colleges historically related to the 
United Methodist Church; an amend- 
ment to waive 1519.3 for two years to 
allow the possibility that Morristown 
College in Tennessee could be re-ac- 
credited was defeated in subcommittee; 



•A request for the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry (BHEM) 
to develop guidelines for annual con- 
ference boards of ordained ministry; 

•A request for BHEM to recruit 
chaplains who speak another language 
beside English to serve in United 
Methodist institutions and in 
governmentjil agencies; 

•A number of editorial changes in 
various disciplinary paragraphs. 

Concurred with: 

•A petition asking BHEM to design a 
comprehensive plan for recruitment, 
training and deployment of Native 
American clergy that is sensitive to the 
Native American culture; 

•A petition asking one or more semi- 
naries to develop a national forum on 
Native American theology. 

Non-concurred with: 

•A petition that Student Recognition 
Day be observed without offering. 

Referred to: 

•The committee on Ordained and 
Diaconal Ministry a substitute for a peti- 
tion asking development of continuing 
education programs appropriate to Na- 
tive American clergy. 

This legislative committee has com- 
pleted its work. 

-Lester Moore and John Borchert. 

Local Church 

Concurred with:. 

•A petition adding a coordinator of 
adult ministries to the council on mini- 
stries; 

•A petition to add a coordinator of 
single adult ministries, person in minis- 
try with persons who have handicapping 
conditions and a coordinator of scouting 
to the coimcil on ministries; 

•A petition that churches form class 
meetings based on the Wesleyan model; 

•A petition to delete reference to age 
groups, racial groups, ethnic groups and 
groups with handicapping conditions 
from para. 202 that deals with the min- 
istiy of the local church; 

Nonconcurred with:, 

•A petition adding the church his- 
torian to the council on ministries; 

Referred to: 

*The General Board of Pensions a 
petition that provision be made for 
health and life insurance, severance pay 
and pensions for full-time lay employees 
of the local church. 

-Laura Okumu 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

•The minority report supporting dele- 
tion of the last sentence of para. 402.2 
will be distributed to the committee. 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



145 



Concurred with: 

•A petition adding a new item 2 to 
para. 519 to charge the district superin- 
tendent to seek to lead pastors and chur- 
ches to a commitment "to the mandate of 
inclusiveness...;" 

•A petition to change the minimal con- 
sultation with the committee on district 
superintendency from at least twice a 
year to at least "annually"; 

•A petition to change Para. 520. 1 to list 
diaconal ministers, as well as pastors, as 
those under the district superintendent's 
supervision; 

*A petition to include diaconal mini- 
sters in Para 521.1 and 521.4 as part of 
the personnel with whom the superin- 
tendent will work. The committee was 
unanimous in support of this petition; 

•A petition that chaplains may be con- 
sidered for less than full-time service; 

•A petition that ministers seeking less 
than full-time service should make re- 
quests three months (instead of six 
months) before annual conference; 

* A petition that interim appointments 
may be made to charges with special 
transitional needs or where pastors are 
on sabbatical leave; 

*A petition that the Jurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy may refer 
complaints as a charge to the Jurisdic- 
tional Ck)mmittee on Investigation; 

•A petition that bishops fix appoint- 
ments of deaconesses and missionaries 
and see that their names and appoint- 
ments are printed in the conference jour- 
nals; 

*A petition that bishops provide 
general oversight of the fiscal and 
program concerns of the annual con- 
ference and may include agencies to see 
that provisions of the church are fol- 
lowed; 

•A petition that diaconal ministers 
may (instead of shall) be a member of the 
local church where he or she resides and 
works; 

•A petition making changes in In- 
voluntary Termination of Ordained Min- 
isters; 

'Petitions increasing the size of the 
board of diaconal ministry up to 12 
(rather than nine) elected members and 
no fewer than one-third clergy; 

•Petition to include the leave of ab- 
sence for diaconal ministers from three 
to five years; 

•Petition for full retirement of 
diaconal ministers afler 20 years of ap- 
proved service; 

•Petition that annual conferences may 
grant a three-month study leave to dis- 
trict superintendents once during their 
six-year term; 

•Petition that lay observers shall be on 
the Board of Ordained Ministry without 



vote; concurrence followed lengthy 
debate; 

•Petition to give the Board of Ordained 
Ministry responsibility to enlist and 
recruit ministers who "have an under- 
standing of and appreciation for persons 
of different racial ethnic heritage;" 

•Petition to add a representative of 
older adults to the conference episcopacy 
committee; 

Non-concurred with:. 

•Many petitions which would have 
given diaconal ministers all rights of or- 
dained ministers including ministerial 
vote at annual conferences; 

•A petition to lower bishops' retire- 
ment age formula from 68 to 66 years; 

Referred:, 

•To the Judicial Council for an im- 
mediate ruling a petition about a review 
committee's findings on an allegation 
against a bishop; 

•To the Council of Bishops a request 
for an in-depth study of U.S./U.S.S.R. 
relations; 

•To the General Board of Pensions a 
petition to change full retirement from 
37 years to 35 years; 

•To the Ministry Study Committee a 
petition asking a separate category for 
diaconal ministers other than lay or or- 
dained. 
-Dan Gangler and Keith Pohl 

Discipleship: 

Concurred with petitions for. 

•The development of family enrich- 
ment resources which would follow the 
format of the marriage enrichment semi- 
nars; 

•A program to strengthen Native 
American family life; 

•Development of a National School of 
Evangelism for Native Americans in 
cooperation with the Native American 
International Caucus (NAIC) and the 
Oklahoma Indian Missionary Con- 
ference (OIMC); 

•Local church pastors to send the 
names of persons applying for the lay 
speaker program to the district lay 
speaker, 

•Changing the Discipline heading for 
United Methodist Men to United 
Methodist Men's Division. 

Nonconcurred with requests to: 

•Change the lay speaker program to 
certified lay ministries; 

•Establish a local church office of 
church exhorter; 

•Establish the organization of the 
local United Methodist church. 

Referred to the: 

•General Board of Discipleship 
(GBOD) a call mandating individual con- 
ference support of adult day care 
programs; 



•GBOD petitions dealing with the 
development of resources to strengthen 
the training of local church librarians 
and the development of church libraries; 

•GBOD a resolution (formerly a peti- 
tion) for sponsorship of Awareness Con- 
vocations for non-Native American pas- 
tors assigned to Native American chur- 
ches after amending the resolution to en- 
sure the cooperation of the NAIC and 
OIMC. 

•GBOD a resolution calling for a 
church-wide study of the general minis- 
try of all members of The United 
Methodist Church. 

Deferred- 

•All actions dealing with petitions 
about youth ministry until after the Na- 
tional Youth Ministry Organization 
report was received from the sub-com- 
mittee. 

-Paul Ruark 

Financial Administration 

Concurred with: 

•A substitute petition to approve a cap 
of $410 million for the 1988-92 quadren- 
nium with $399,698,000 to be used for 
apportioned fimds and the balance of 
$10,302,000 to be used for other items es- 
tablished by the 1988 General Con- 
ference (66 For - 16 Against), defeated 
amendments which would have set caps 
of $400 million and $405 million; 

•A resolution permitting the General 
Council on Finance and Administration 
(GrCFA) to perform its job in the transfer 
of Scarritt Graduate School to the 
Women's Division of the Board of Global 
Ministries; 

•An amendment to allow a 2/3 
majority of the executive committee of 
the United Methodist Publishing House 
to buy, sell or remodel property under a 
cost of $500,000 between meetings of the 
General Board. Any transaction above 
that figure must be ordered by the 
General Conference. 

•Replacing the word salary with com- 
pensation in numerous places in the Dis- 
cipline related to pensions in an effort to 
clarify. Concern was raised that unless 
other legislation is uniform in using this 
replacement, confusion would still 
result. 

•A petition to establish an "unbiased" 
conmiittee to study whether the Board of 
Global Ministries should be moved from 
New York City (concurrence came after 
an earlier decision to refer the petition 
was reconsidered); 

•A petition that the annual conference 
council on fmance and administration 
shall ensure adequate racial and ethnic 
minority representation after amending 
it to read "in so far as possible." 



146 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Recommended nonconcurrence with: 

•A petition asking that the terms 
"union/uniting/united" which connote 
cooperation, replace "merger/merg- 
ing/merged" denoting loss of identity in 
legislation related to the joining of chur- 
ches. The committee believed such sub- 
stitution would lead to confusion in 
other legislation; 

•Four petitions restricting church 
publications to the use of "Father, Son 
and Holy Spirit" and the use of tradition- 
al masculine pronouns and/or prohibit- 
ing the use ofthe New Revised Standard 
Version ofthe Bible; 

•Several petitions requesting a limit 
on annual conference budget increases; 

*A petition mandating the Board of 
Pensions to invest 10 percent of its 
portfolio in the United Methodist 
Development Fund (Decision based on 
present Fund policy restricting the 
amount of investment from any one in- 
vestor, 10 percent of the Pensions 
portfolio would exceed that amount). 

Tabled: 

•All petitions related to the Ministerial 
Education Fund, including one asking 
for a change in the apportionment for- 
mula. 

-Linda Bloom and Clyde Chestnut 



Independent Commissions and 
Judicial Administration 

Concurred with: 

•Guidelines for annual conferences to 
select members of the conference com- 
mission on religion and race through 
new text for para. 739.2; 

•Mandating that each district have a 
director and committee on religion and 
race, para. 748; 

•Several changes to strengthen the 
work of conference commissions on ar- 
chives and history; 

•Naming one new United Methodist 
historic shrine and three new historical 
landmarks; 

•Petitions to support continued mem- 
bership in the National Council of Chur- 
ches of Christ in the USA and the World 
Council of Churches; 

•Petitions retaining para. 2621.1b, 
"practices declared by The United 
Methodist church to be incompatible 
with Christian teachings," among char- 
geable offenses. 

Recommended nonconcurrence with: 

•Several efforts to establish new com- 
missions but urged inclusion of impor- 
tant programs and ministries within 
present agencies, including UM Com- 



petitions Re-referred by the Committee on Reference 



Old Petition Number New Petition Number 

483-MN-3000-R$ 483-FA-3000-R$ 

1241-GA-3000-R1 241-FA-3000-R 

1659-IJ-3000-R 1659-GA-3000-R 

1977-MN-453-D 1977-FA-453-D 

2561-IJ-3000-R 2561-CC-3000-R 

Petition No. 2662-CC-3000-R$ Enabling Act to Elect Additional Bishop, 
Africa Central Conference, replaces Petition No. 2662-CC-636-D. 



Strengthened By Prayer Women as Preachers 



Leaders and delegates to General Con- 
ference are being lifted up in prayer con- 
tinually during sessions by thousands of 
persons participating in a General Con- 
ference prayer vigil. The focus of the 
vigil is not on issues, but strength of 
spirit for each delegate to be open to 
God's guidance during the conference. 
The vigil was organized by The Upper 
Room's "Walk to Emmaus" movement. 
Over 2,500 persons in 70 Emmaus com- 
munities are participating. 



"I believe in the admission of women 
to the General Conference....Twenty 
years ago I settled the question that if a 
woman can preach as well as I can, she 
has as good a right to preach as I have. 
If she can preach better, she has a bet- 
ter right, and if she can't preach as well 
as I can she ought not to preach at all." 

Dr. Robert Forbes at General Con- 
ference, Methodist Episcopal Church, 
1896. Daily Christian Advocate 



munications. Board of Church and 
Society, Commission on Archives and 
History, and the Division of Health and 
Welfare of the Board of Global Mini- 
stries; 

•All petitions to eliminate legislation 
related to the Commission on the Status 
and Role of Women. 

-Bettie Story and Arthur Swarthout 



Correction/ Addition 

Because of a computer error in the 
April 28 DCA (p. 103), the fmal lines of 
Carolyn Marshall's biography were left 
out. The last portion should read as fol- 
lows: 

"Her education includes a B.A. in busi- 
ness administration from Drake Univer- 
sity, Des Moines, Iowa; and earlier 
studies at DePauw University, Green- 
castle, Ind. 

"Within South Indiana, she has headed 
the conference personnel committee 
since 1980. 

"Her family includes her husband, 
John, and four children." 




Newscope can heipj,ou keep up with 
the news in only 15 minutes a week. 
The weekly four-page newsletter, 
published by The L nited Methodist 
Publishing House, provides sum- 
maries ofthe major events, actions, 
and activities of United Methodists 
across the nation and world. Fea- 
tures include: 

• coverage of episcopal elections 

• summaries of annual conferences 

• unusual ministries of local 
churches 

• actions of general agencies 

50 issues for SI 8.25. second class, or 
S22.25 first class deliverv. 
Write Newscope, P. O. Box 801, 
Nashville, tSj 37202 (615-749- 
6417). 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



147 



CALENDAR ITEMS 



Consent Calendar 

Calendar items printed with an ♦ 
after the calendar number will 
automatically be placed on the Consent 
Calendar. If any delegate wishes to 
remove an item from the Consent 
Calendar for plenary consideration, 
that delegate shall complete the ap- 
proved form in Room 122 by 3 p.m. on 
the day the calendar item fu^t appears 
in the DCA. Minority reports will be in- 
dicated in parentheses. 

Rule 27(2). 



Consent Calendar No. 2 

Rule 27.2 
Advance DCA, p. B-18 



59. 62, 
80,81,82 
102, 105, 
117, 118, 
131, 132, 
151, 152, 
161, 162, 
181, 182, 
190, 196, 
204, 205, 
215,217, 
234, 235, 
245, 247, 
261, 262, 
270, 272, 
279, 281, 
289, 291, 
306, 307, 
317, 318, 
326, 327, 
335, 336, 



Calander Items 

66, 70, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 
, 85, 86, 92, 94, 96, 97, 98, 101, 
106, 110, 112, 114, 115, 116, 
119, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 
133, 137, 141, 147, 148, 149, 
153, 154, 155, 156, 159, 160, 
163, 165, 173, 174, 178, 179, 
183, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 
197, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 
208, 209, 211, 212, 213, 214, 
218., 225, 229, 230, 232, 233, 
236, 237, 238, 239, 242, 243, 
252, 254, 256, 258, 259, 260, 
263, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 
273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 
282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 
292, 294, 296, 303, 304, 305, 
308, 309, 310, 312, 313, 314, 
319, 320, 321, 323, 324, 325, 
329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 
337,338, 341,342. 



Removal from 
Consent Calendar 

Delegates have requested these 
calendar items to be removed from 
Consent Calendar No. 1. DCA page 
130: 

22. 



56 



LC 



Subject: The Mission of the Church 

Petitions: 1033-LC- 103-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-29 
Membership 94; Present 89 



For 87; Against 2; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

57 LC 

Subject: Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel 

Petitions: 45-LC-267-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-40 
Membership 94; Present 82 
For 45; Against 37; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



58 LC 

Subject: The Mission of the Church 

Petitions: 29-LC- 103-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-29 
Membership 94; Present 86 
For 75; Against 7; Not Voting 4 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



61 



59' 



LC 



Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 2068-LC-2525-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 80 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence in favor of 916-LC- 
2525-D 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



60 



FA32 
Subject: Disengagement 

Petitions: 1489-FA-3000-R, 1506-FA- 

3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: 

Membership 91; Present 83 

For 82; Against 1; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
these petitions which allow local chur- 
ches to withdraw or disengage from The 
United Methodist Church if the General 
Conference changes the church's posi- 
tion on homosexuality. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



FA31 

Subject: Prohibit Funding of 
Abortion on Demand 

Petitions: 1877-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 83 
For 81; Against 2; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which prohibits use of 
United Methodist funds to promote abor- 
tion on demand or as a form of birth 
control. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



62* 



FA30 

Subject: Funding of Noninclusive 
Groups 

Petitions: 2260-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 91 
For 81; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which provides that funds 
not be given to any non-United 
Methodist group which is not inclusive 
in race or ideology. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



63 



FA29 
Subject: Enforcement of Par. 906.12 

Petitions: 364-FA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 83 
For 80; Against 1; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition, which requests an inves- 
tigation of the expenditures of the 
General Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women and provides that, if 
violations of Par. 906.12 are discovered, 
all monies so used be refunded to the 
General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration and the persons involved 
be relieved of their responsibilities. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



64 



MN 

Subject: Alternate 
Recommendations in Response to 
Report of the Commission for the 
Study of Ministry 

Petitions: 1084-MN-3000-R$ 



148 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Pages in Advance DCA: E-73 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 85; Against 2; Not Voting 5 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee votes nonconcurrence 
in favor of 1019-MN-3000-R$. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



65 



MN 



Subject: Recommendations From 
the Commission for the Study of 
Ministry 

Petitions: 1019-MN-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-70 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 88; Against 4; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

It is recommended that: 

1. The Commission for the Study of 
Ministry be continued for the 1989-92 

ploting tho unfmi s hod part of its 1 98 4 



2. The mandate of the commis- 
sion will include, but not be 
limited by, the 1984 mandate, the 
"Needs for Further Study" of the 
report of the present commission 
(DCA E068) and the "Questions and 
Issues" raised by the Council of 
Bishops (DCA E71-71) with special 
attention to the continuance or dis- 
continuance of guaranteed appoint- 
ments; 

3. Tho 1 98 5 88 mombor s hip of tho 
oommicoion bo continuod with addition 
al mombor s namod by tho Council of 
Bishops to a ss uro racial inclusivono ss 
and roprosontation of local pa s tor s, and 
to fill any vacancioc that might oocufi 
and that tho total number of commi s 
s ion mombors not oxcood 35 ; 

The 1989-92 commission shall be 
composed of not more than 35 per- 
sons to be named by the Council of 
Bishops in accordance with the 
1984 legislation for the Commis- 
sion for the Study of Ministry. Two- 
thirds of the 1985-88 commission 
membership shall be included in 
the 1988-92 membership. In the 
naming of new and additional mem- 
bers, persons shall be named to as- 
sure racial inclusiveness and 
representation of local pastors. 
Vacancies shall be filled by the 
Council of Bishops in accordance 
with this paragraph; 

4. The study report, "The Church and 
Its Ministry," as published in the Ad- 
vance Edition of the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate be commended to the church for 
study and to the commission for use in 



its continuing work; and for fiirthor 
dovolopmont and revision . 

5. The commission continue to con- 
sult with the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry, the General 
Board of Global Ministries, the (Jreneral 
Commission on Christian Unity and In- 
terreligious Concerns, the Council of 
Bishops, and other appropriate agencies 
of the church; and that the commission 
invite the continued and expanded par- 
ticipation of the church in its study of 
ministry over the next quadrennium; 

6. The commission develop proposals 
for implementing legislation as needed 
in the areas of the 1984 General Con- 
ference mandate and related to the con- 
tmuing work in the 1989-92 
quadrennium; and that the commission 
shall report through the Council of 
Bishops to the General Conference not 
later than six months before the conven- 
ing of the General Conference of 1992; 

7. The 1989-92 budget of the commis- 
sion be adequate to support its work in 
light of the foregoing recommendations; 

8. In order to expedite the con- 
tinuation of the study of ministry 
by the 1988-92 Commission for the 
Study of Ministry, the Council of 
Bishops shall convene the organiza- 
tional meeting of the commission 
no later than September 30, 1988. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



66* 



Its 



MN 
Subject: The Church ; 
Ministry 

Petitions: 1017-MN-30(X)-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-58 
Membership 98; Present 91 
For 91; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee receives with apprecia- 
tion the report. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



67 



U18 
Subject: Chargeable Offenses 

Petitions: 873 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-128 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 39; Against 20; Not Voting 3 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Noncurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



OO (Number not assigned) 

69 C045 

Subject: Tenure of Bishops 

Petitions: 272-CO-507-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-60 
Membership 83; Present 79 
For 75; Against 4; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



70' 



C044 
Subject: Assignment Process 

Petitions: 86-CO-507-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-60 
Membership 83; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
The committee recommends noncon- 



currence. 



) Nonconcurrence Date / 



71' 
72 
73 



(Number not assigned) 

(Number not assigned) 

GA 

Subject: Recommendation on 
Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 652-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages m Advance DCA: E-29-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. For background, see petition 
1194-GA-3000-R, Advance DCA, E-24- 
29. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



74* 



GA 



Subject: Report of the Task Force 
on Older Adult Ministries. 

Petitions: 1194-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-24-29 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Committee recommends concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



/ O (Number not assigned) 
/ D (Number not assigned) 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



149 



77* 



C039 

Subject: Instruct Committee on 
Correlation and Editorial Revision 
to Delete Outdated Material in 

Discipline 

Petitions: 2420-CO-3000-R 
Pages in DCA, April 26, 1988: 30 
Membership 83; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence and referral to the Correlations 
and Editorial Committee. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



78* FMl 

Subject: UM Official Statement of 
Theological Teachings 

Petitions: 1029-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see below for text 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
CTirrence since this requires a constitu- 
tional change. 

"We, as members of First UMC, Atlan- 
ta, Texas, in Church Conference session 
on November 22, 1987, do hereby peti- 
tion the 1988 General Conference of 
The United Methodist Church to in- 
clude the following language in the 
United Methodist Official Statement of 
Theological Teachings being submitted 
by the Committee on Our Theological 
Task, such statement to replace the cur- 
rent Doctrine and Doctrinal Statements 
I and the General Rules: 

"We believe in the integrity and 
authority of the Bible as the inspired 
Word of God. 

"We believe in the Virgin Birth, in the 
Crucifixion, Burial and Resurrection of 
Jesus Christ; that God is the Father, 
Jesus Christ is the Son, and the Church 
is the Bride. 

"We believe in the universality of sin, 
justification by faith through the grace 
of God and His Son Jesus Christ, the 
new birth, the witness of the Holy 
Spirit, and sanctification. 

"We believe in the miracles of Jesus 
Christ. 

"We believe in the reality of eternal 
life, of heaven, and of hell. 

"We believe these tenets strike at the 
root of Christianity. 

"We applaud the Committee on Our 
Theological Task for removing the 
doctrine of 'theological pluralism' from 
their recommendation since this 



doctrine has misled many Methodists in 
its implication that one can have any 
view of Scripture he pleases and still be 
called a Christian. 

"We further applaud the frequent use 
of Wesleyan theological references in 
the proposed new statement." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



79 



FM2 

Subject: Emphasize Bible and 
Values 

Petitions: 1524-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see below for text 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 69; Against 10; Not Voting 4 

Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"Response to Concern for Declining 
Membership; Change in Emphasis: 

"Whereas, it has become obvious that 
tradition-based churches are showing 
strong growth because they fulfill the 
spiritual needs of their memberships, 
and; 

"Whereas, churches that espouse tran- 
sient, modem, and political-activist 
theology are declining; 

"Therefore, be it resolved, that the 
General Conference of the UMC em- 
phasize traditional, Bible-based values in 
its Christian social concerns, worship, 
teaching, evangelism, and mission in 
order to fulfill the spiritual needs of the 
people." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



80* 



FM3 

Subject: Junaluska Affirmation of 
Scriptural Christianity 

Petitions: 306-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence since this requires a constitu- 
tional change. 

"THE JUNALUSKA AFFIRMATION 

of Scriptural Christianity for United 
Methodists 
"Preamble: 

"In a time of theological pluralism. 
Good News and other evangelicals 
within United Methodism have thought 
it necessary to reaffirm the historic faith 
of the church. Our theological under- 
standing of this faith has been expressed 



in the Apostles' Creed, Nicene Creed, 
and in John Wesley's standard Sermons 
and the Exploratory Notes Upon the 
New Testament. We affirm in their en- 
tirety the validity and integrity of these 
expressions of scriptural truth and recog- 
nize them as the doctrinal standards of 
our denomination. 

"We also recognize that our situation 
calls for a contemporary restatement of 
these truths. The merging of two great 
traditions, the Evangelical United 
Brethren and the Methodist, with their 
two authentic witnesses to the historic 
faith. The Confession of Faith and The 
Articles of Religion, gives further oc- 
casion for such a statement. Moreover, 
we recognize the mandate which the 
doctrinal statement of the 1972 General 
Conference has placed upon all its mem- 
bers to accept the challenge of respon- 
sible theological reflection. 

"Consequently, we offer to The United 
Methodist Church this theological affir- 
mation of scriptural Christianity. 
■THE HOLY TRJNITY 
"Scriptural Christianity affirms the ex- 
istence of the one Eternal God who has 
revealed Himself as Father, Son, and 
Holy Spirit, three equal but distinct Per- 
sons, mysteriously united in the God- 
head which the church historically has 
described as the Holy Trinity. 
"GOD THE FATHER 
"Scriptural Christianity affirms that 
the first person of the Holy Trinity, God 
the Father, is the Eternal One and 
reigns supremely. He has provided a 
covenant through which His creatures 
can be redeemed and through which His 
creations will be liberated from all evil 
and brought to final righteousness at 
the end of the age. 

"GOD THE SON 
"Scriptural Christianity affirms that 
the second Person of the Holy Trinity, 
the Eternal Son, became incarnate as 
Mary's virgin-bom Child, Jesus of 
Nazareth, the Christ. In His imique Per- 
son, He revealed to us both the fullness 
of deity and the fullness of humanity. By 
His life, suffering, death, resurrection, 
and ascension. He provided the only way 
of salvation. His sacrifice on the cross 
once and for all was to reconcile the 
Holy God and sinners, thus providing 
the only way of access to the Father. 
Now He intercedes as High Priest before 
the Father, awaiting the day when He 
will retum to judge every person, living 
and dead, and to consummate His 
Kingdom. 



150 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



"GOD THE HOLY SPIRIT 

"Scriptural Christianity aflirms that 
the third Person of the Holy Trinity, the 
Holy Spirit, was active from the begin- 
ning in creation, revelation, and redemp- 
tion. It was through His anointing that 
prophets received the Word of God, 
priests became intermediaries between 
God and His people, and kings were 
given ruling authority. The Spirit's 
presence and power, measured in the 
Old Testament, were found without 
measure in Jesus of Nazareth, the 
Anointed. The Spirit convicts and woos 
the lost, gives new birth to the penitent, 
and abides in the believer, perfecting 
holiness and empowering the church to 
carry out Christ's mission in the world. 
He came to indwell His church at Pen- 
tecost, enabling believers to yield fruit 
and endowing them with spiritual gifts 
according to His will. He bears witness 
to Christ and guides God's people into 
His truth. He inspired the Holy Scrip- 
tures, God's written Word, and con- 
tinues to illuminate His people 
concerning His will and truth. His 
guidance is always in harmony with 
Christ and the truth as given in the 
Holy Scriptures. 

"HUMANITY 

"Scriptural Christianity afTirms that 
man and woman are fashioned in the 
image of God and are difTerent from all 
of God's other creatures. God intends 
that we should glorify Him and enjoy 
Him forever. Since the Fall of Adam the 
corruption of sin has pervaded every per- 
son and extended into social relation- 
ships, societal systems, and all creation. 
This corruption is so pervasive that we 
are not capable of positive response to 
God's offer of redemption, except by the 
prevenient, or preparing grace of God. 
Only through the justifying, regenerat- 
ing, and sanctifying work of the Triune 
God can we be saved from the corrup- 
tion of sin, become increasingly con- 
formed to the image of Christ, and be 
restored to the relationship which God 
has intended for us. 

"THE HOLY SCRIPTURES 

"Scriptural Christianity affirms as the 
only written Word of God the Old and 
New Testaments. These Holy Scriptures 
contain all that is necessary for our 
knowledge of God's holy and sovereign 
will, of Jesus Christ the only Redeemer, 
of our salvation, and of our growth in 
grace. They are to be received through 
the Holy Spirit as the guide and final 
authority for the faith and conduct of in- 
dividuals and the doctrines and the life 
of the church. Whatever is not clearly 



revealed in, or plainly establbhed as 
truth by, the Holy Scriptures cannot be 
required as an article of faith nor be 
taught as essential to salvation. Anyth- 
ing contrary to the teachings of the Holy 
Scriptures is contrary to the purposes of 
God and must, therefore, be opposed. 
The authority of Scripture derives from 
the fact that God, through His Spirit, in- 
spired the authors, causing them to per- 
ceive God's truth and record it with 
accuracy. It is evident that the Holy 
Scriptures have been preserved during 
the long process of transmission 
through copyists and translators, and we 
attribute such accurate preservation to 
the work of the Holy Spirit. These Scrip- 
tures are supremely authoritative for the 
church's teaching, preaching, witness, 
identifying error, correcting the erring, 
and training believers for ministry in 
and through the church. 

"SALVATION 

"Scriptural Christianity affirms that 
God offers salvation to a sinful 
humanity and a lost world through 
Jesus Christ. By His death on the cross 
the sinless Son propitiated the holy 
wrath of the Father, a righteous anger 
occasioned by sin. By His resurrection 
from the dead, the glorified Son raises 
us to newness of life. When we ap- 
propriate by faith God's atoning work in 
Jesus Christ, we are forgiven, justified, 
regenerated by His Holy Spirit, and 
adopted into the family of God. By His 
grace He sanctifies His children, purify- 
ing their hearts by faith, renewing them 
in the image of God, and enabling them 
to love God and neighbor with whole 
heart. The fullness of God's great salva- 
tion will come with the return of Christ. 
This cosmic event will signal the resur- 
rection of the saved to eternal life and 
the lost to eternal damnation, the libera- 
tion of creation from the Adamic curse, 
God's final victory over every power and 
dominion, and the establishment of the 
new heaven and the new earth. 
"THE CHURCH 

"Scriptural Christianity affirms that 
the church of Jesus Christ is the com- 
munity of all true believers under His 
sovereign Lordship. This church, the 
Body of Christ, is one because it shares 
one Lord, one faith, one baptism. It is 
holy because it belongs to God and is set 
apart for His purposes in the world. It is 
apostolic because it partakes of the 
authority granted to the apostles by 
Christ Himself. It is universal because it 
includes all believers, both living and 
dead, in every nation, regardless of 
denominational affiliation. Its authen- 



ticity is to be found wherever the pure 
Word of God is preached and taught; 
wherever the Sacraments of Baptism 
and Holy Communion are celebrated in 
obedience to Christ's conamand; 
wherever the gifts of the Holy Spirit up- 
build the body and bring spiritual 
growth; wherever the Spirit of God 
creates a loving, caring fellowship, and a 
faithfulness in witness and service to the 
world; and wherever discipline is ad- 
ministered with love under the guidance 
of the Word of God. The church, as the 
Bride of Christ, will ultimately be joined 
with her Lord in triumphant glory. 
"ETHICS 

"Scriptural Christianity affirms that 
we are God's workmanship, created in 
Christ Jesus for good works. These 
works are the loving expression of 
gratitude by the believer for the new life 
received in Christ. They do not earn 
one's salvation, nor are they a substitute 
for God's work of redemption. Rather, 
they are the result of regeneration and 
are manifest in the believer as evidence 
of a living faith. 

"God has called us to do justice, to 
love kindness, and to walk humbly with 
Him. In the Scriptures are found the 
standards and principles that guide the 
believer in this walk. These ethical im- 
peratives, willingly accepted by the 
believer, enable us to be a part of God's 
purposes in the world. Moreover, in this 
we are called to an obedience that does 
not stop short of our willingness to suf- 
fer for righteousness' sake even unto 
death. 

"Our life m Christ includes an unstint- 
ing devotion to deeds of kindness and 
mercy and a wholehearted participation 
in collective efforts to alleviate need and 
suffering. The believer will work for 
honesty, justice, and equity in human af- 
fairs; all of which witness to inherent 
rights and a basic dignity common to all 
persons created in the image of God. 
Such contemporary issues as racism, 
housing, welfare, education, Marxism, 
capitalism, hunger, crime, sexism, family 
relationships, aging, sexuality, drugs and 
alcohol, abortion, leisure, pornography, 
and related issues caU for prayerful con- 
sideration, thoughtful analysis, and ap- 
propriate action from Christians and 
must always be a matter of concern to 
the church. Thus, we remember that 
faith without works is dead." 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconeurrence Date / 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



151 



81* FM4 

Subject: Discontinue use of term 
"Act of God" 

Petitions: 1694-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

Advance DCA 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"I urge that you adopt a resolution 
recommending the discontinuance of 
the term "Act of God" when referring to 
fires, accidents, earthquakes, floods, vol- 
canic eruptions, and other disastrous 
events." 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



82* FM5 

Subject: Retain Article I 

Petitions: 2639-FM-68-0 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

Advance DCA; see below for text 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence since this requires constitution- 
al consideration. 

'The Honey Brook United Methodist 
Church, of the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Conference, of the The United 
Methodist Church meeting on February 
15, 1988, discussed the idea of replacing 
the words of "Father, Son, and Holy 
Spirit," which are found in the Articles 
of Religion of 1784. All 18 members 
present and voting wished to have their 
mind heard. We wish Article I. of the Ar- 
ticles of Religion as found in the 1984 
Discipline, Par. 68, Article I. -Of Faith 
in the Holy Trinity shall remain as 
stated: 

"There is but one living and true God, 
everlasting, without body or parts, of in- 
finite power, wisdom, and goodness; the 
maker and preserver of all things, both 
visible and invisible. And in imity of this 
Godhead there are three persons, of one 
substance, power, and etemity-the 
Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



83 FA16 

Subject: Delete Par. 906.12 

Petitions: 138-FA-906-D, 139-FA-906-D, 
512-FA-906-D, 807-FA-906-D, 940-FA- 
906-D, 1373-FA-906-D, 1408-FA-3000-R, 
1483-FA-906-D, 1531-FA-906-D, 1875- 



FA-906-D, 1876-FA-906-D, 2036-FA-906- 

D, 2038-FA-906-D, 2185-FA-906-D, 2531- 

FA-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 

Membership 91; Present 84 

For 70; Against 14; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
these petitions in favor of Petition 137- 
FA-906-D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



84 HEl 

Subject: African Initiative 

Petitions: 1082-HE-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: F-58 
Membership 83; Present 70 
For 66; Against 1; Not Voting 3 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Beginning on page F-58 and continu- 
ing onto F-60 remains as printed. Delete 
No. 7 on F-60 and replace it with the fol- 
lowing resolution: 

"Whereas, the African central con- 
ferences of The United Methodist 
Church have asked the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry to assist 
them in developing a significant post- 
secondary institution of learning for the 
churches of Africa; and 

"Whereas, the central conferences of 
Africa have taken the initiative in plan- 
ning and urging the church's attention 
to this mission, now called "the Africa In- 
itiative"; and 

"Whereas, a series of planning meet- 
ings has been held and determined the 
missional importance of this enterprise 
and has recommended as the ap- 
propriate site Old Mutare in Zimbabwe; 
and 

"Whereas, the colleges and univer- 
sities of The United Methodist Church 
have given their enthusiastic support 
and technical assistance to the initiative, 
including the establishment of a Univer- 
sity Advisory Committee; and 

"Whereas, The United Methodist 
Church and its predecessor denomina- 
tions have no established college or 
university in Africa after more than 150 
years of presence there; and 

"Whereas, Africa will contain 20% of 
the world's population by the year 2000 
and presently has the fastest growing 
Christian movement in the world; and 

"Whereas, it is the expectation of the 
General Board of Higher Education and 
Ministry that the institution being in- 
itiated by this fund will become one of 
the great schools of higher learning in 
the world, to provide lay and clergy 
leadership for the Christian churches of 



Africa in the most critical period in that 
continent's history in faithfulness to 
Jesus Christ; 

"Therefore, be it resolved, that the 
1988 General Conference establish an 
apportioned fund called "The Africa 
Higher Education Initiative Fund" to be 
raised by the churches during the quad- 
rennium 1989-1992, said fund to be in 
the amount of $5 million per year. 

"Furthermore, the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry, in 
cooperation with the General Board of 
Global Ministries, will seek to identify 
personnel resources for the initiative. 

"Furthermore, the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry will es- 
tablish a philanthropic fund-raising unit 
to provide substantial additional support 
to the initiative to respond to the recog- 
nized need for higher education in 
Africa. 

"Furthermore, the GBHEM is 
authorized to form the Africa University 
Corporation which shall continue all ad- 
vance planning and organization for the 
proposed university with the under- 
standing that the initial plan of finance, 
as well as documentation assuring 
availability of university services to stu- 
dents from other countries, shall be ap- 
proved by the GCFA after receiving the 
advice and recommendations of the 
GCOM. The two councils are asked to 
review these matters by January 1, 1989. 

"It is understood that, in order to en- 
sure long-range stability in the univer- 
sity, one-half of the funds raised in The 
Africa Higher Education Initiative Fund 
will become a permanent endowment to 
be supplemented by other philanthropic 
giving and under the management of the 
General Board of Higher Education and 
Ministry." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



85^ 



GMll 

Subject: Responsibilities of 
National Division 

Petitions: 2192-GM-1414-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-106 
Membership 119; Present 106 
For 106; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted concurrence 
with the petition as printed. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



86* GMIO 

Subject: Responsibilities of 

National Division 



152 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Petitions: 589-GM-1414-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-106 
Membership 119; Present 106 
For 106; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted concurrence 
with the following amendment added to 
#13, line 7. 

To rolatod to W ork with the Parish 
and Commimity Development Commit- 
tee or its equivalent committoo of in an 
annual conference by providing resour- 
ces to their suboommittoo s on the initia- 
tion and development of programs with 
agencies related to the National 
Division, church and community minis- 
try, congregational development, mini- 
stries in town and coxmtry and urban 
areas, and other missionally oriented 
ministries. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



90 



87 



GM8 

Subject: Church and Community 
Workers 

Petitions: 354-GM-3000-R$ 
Pages m Advance DCA: D-216 
Membership 119; Present 107 
For 106; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted nonconcurrence 
with the resolution. Rationale: Covered 
in previous action. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



88 



GM3 
Subject: Office of Deaconess 

Petitions: 591-GM-1418-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-107 
Membership 119; Present 109 
For 108; Agamst 1; Not Votmg 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence with the petition as 
printed was voted by the committee. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



89 GM12 

Subject: Responsibilities of 

National Division 

Petitions: 2643-GM-1414-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-106 
Membership 119; Present 107 
For 107; Agamst 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted nonconcur- 
rence. Rationale: Covered in previous ac- 
tion. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



GM13 

Subject: Responsibilities of 
National Division 

Petitions: 2050-GM-1414-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-106 
Membership 119; Present 107 
For 106; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted nonconcur- 
rence. Rationale: Covered in previous ac- 
tion. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



91 GM14 

Subject: Authority and 

Organization of National Divison 

Petitions: 590-GM-1415-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-107 
Membership 119 Present 107 
For 106; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee voted concurrence 
with the petition as printed. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



92' 



C035 

Subject: Composition of Annual 
Conferences 

Petitions: 2248-CO-701-D 
Pages in DCA: 29 
Membership 83 Present 67 
For 67; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



93 



C036 

Subject: Petitions to General 
Conference 

Petitions: 1 134-CO-608-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-65 
Membership 83 Present 72 
For 69; Against 2; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Responsibilities of C.FA. 

Petitions: 402-FA-709D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-72 
Membership 91 Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 



We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-72 of the 
Advance DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

95 FA55 

Subject: Membership on CFA 

Petitions: 401-FA-708-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-72 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 70; Against 5; Not Voting 3 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We reconmiend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-72 in the 
Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



96* 



FA56 

Subject: Ex-officio members of 
CCFA 

Petitions: 1110-FA-708-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-72 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-72 in the 
Advance DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



97^ 



GMl 

Subject: Jurisdictional Assoc, of 
Deaconesses/Home Mission 

Petitions: 578-GM-631-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-66 
Membership 119; Present 106 
For 106; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence with the petition as 
printed was voted. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



98^ 



GM5 
Subject: Committee on Deaconess 

Petitions: 592-GM-1419-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-108 
Membership 119; Present 107 
For 107; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence was voted by the commit- 
tee with the petition. | 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / i 



99 GM6 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
Committee on Deaconess and 
Home Missionary Service 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



153 



Petitions: 593-GM-1420-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-109 
Membership 119; Present 108 
For 104; Against 3; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence was voted by the commit- 
tee, with the petitions as printed in the 
DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



100 



GM4 
Subject: Retain Office of Deaconess 

Petitions: 1647-GM-1418-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-107 
Membership 119; Present 109 
For 108; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence with the petition was 
voted by the committee. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



101 



FA45 

Subject: Administrative 
Responsibilities of GCFA (907.2) 

Petitions: 1 145-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-90 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-90 in the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition as printed on p. C-89 in the 
Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



104 FA49 

Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 1259-FA-2512-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 81; Against 3; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition removing the phrase in the of 
foctivo relation from Par. 2512.1 which 
names the membership of the con- 
ference board of trustees. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



105' 



FA48 

Subject: Plans for New Church 
Construction 

Petitions: 282-FA-3000-M 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition requiring The United 
Methodist Church develop room-size sug- 
gestions and make these ideas available 
to local churches. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



102' 



FA46 

Subject: Administrative 

Responsibilities of GCFA 

Petitions: 1 146-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-90 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-90 in the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / ( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



106'^ FA51 

Subject: Title Change - Board of 

Trustees (Par. 2512) 

Petitions: 1163-FA-2512-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-122 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on page C-122 in Ad- 
vance DCA. 



We recommend nonconcurrence with 
these petitions in favor of petition 1259- 
FA-2512-D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



108 



FA53 
Subject: Audit 

Petitions: 1135-FA-713-D, 2011-FA-713- 

D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-72 

Membership 91; Present 78 

For 76; Against 2; Not Votmg 

Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with 
these petitions as printed on page C-72 
in the Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



109 



FA52 

Subject: Changing Title from 
Conference Treasurer to Director 
of Administrative Services 

Petitions: 1069-FA-708-D, 1070-FA-709- 

D, 1071-FA-715-D, 1072-FA-716-D, 1136- 

FA-715-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: 

Membership 91; Present 79 

For 72; Against 6; Not Voting 1 

Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
these petitions asking to change the title 
of Conference Treasurer to Director of 
Admin istration/Treasiirer. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



110' 



FA27 

Subject: Help for Pastors* 
Widows/Widowers 

Petitions: 2423-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91 Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition that asks for financial help 
in the area of housing for surviving 
spouses. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



103 



FA47 

Subject: Joint Committee on 
Stewardship (Par. 907-6) 

Petitions: 1039-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 42; Agamst 32; Not Voting 10 
Date: April 28, 1988 



107 FA50 

Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 2061-FA-2512-D, 2062-FA- 

2512-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: 

Membership 91; Present 84 

For 81; Agamst 3; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 



111 FA28 

Subject: Pins for Retired Ministers 

Petitions: 1542-FA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91 Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 



154 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which asks for a pin to be 
given to retirees in recognition of their 
years of service. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



112^ 



FA33 

Subject: World Service Fund (Par. 
912) 

Petitions: 267-FA-912-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91 Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition asking that the description 
of the World Service fund be changed 
from tho fir s t bonovolont rospon s ibility 
e( to the first benevolence con- 
sidered by the churchy 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



113 



FA34 

Subject: Revision of Benevolence 
Statement 

Petitions: 141-FA-912-D (Par. 912.1) 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-91 
Membership 91 Present 79 
For 74; Against 5; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition as printed on p. C-91 of the 
Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



114* FA35 

Subject: World Service Fund (new 

Par. for Par. 912.4) 

Petitions: 2040-FA-912-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91 Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition that requests apportioned 
funds for the World Service Fund which 
are divided among two or more General 
Church agencies be itemized separately. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



115* FA36 
Subject: Apportionments 

Petitions: 2261-FA-912-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 



We recommend nonconcurrence of 
this petition recommending the naming 
of apportionments, advtmce specials, 
and World Service special gifls as 
primary channels for local church 
benevolences. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



King James Version of the Holy Bible is 
the inerrant Word of Grod, Jesus Christ 
and the Holy Ghost". 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



116^ 



GM15 

Subject: Optional Executive 
Committee 

Petitions: 1795-GM-1416-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 
DCA; see p. 507 in Discipline 
Membership 119; Present 109 
For 109; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



117* FM6 

Subject: Declare Authorized King 
James Version of the Holy Bible as 
the inerrant Word 

Petitions: 1814-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"Whereas, God, the Father, Jesus, the 
Son, Holy Ghost, the Comforter have 
never made an error, mistake or blunder 
at any time and never will (St. Matthew 
5:48). 

"Whereas, the Bible is the Holy Word 
of God which the Holy Ghost guided 
men of God to write in English (John 
14:26, 2 Tim. 16-17). 

"Whereas the Authorized King James 
Version glorified God in making 
America the greatest God-fearing nation 
on earth. 

"Whereas the Providence of Almighty 
God selected this English Version as the 
guiding Light of the American people. 

"Whereas, as of 1948, there was practi- 
cally no other English Version in use in 
America. Whereas, the Bible itself states 
that no man should change the words 
(Revelation 22:18-19). 

"Whereas, the Bible also states that 
Jesus Christ is the Word (St. John 1:1- 
17). 

"Whereas, we, the General Conference 
of the United Methodist Church humbly 
beg that God have mercy upon each of 
us and that the United Methodist 
Church declare that the Authorized 



118^ 



FM7 
Subject: Changing words in 

Discipline. 

Petitions: 1749-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"My petition is in reference to the 
thought of changing certain wordings in 
the Discipline. My hope is that we keep , 

the wording in retrospect of the past or 
we will lose much truth in the future. If 
we keep changing words or beliefs then 
why should many of us believe its Grod's 
word. It will end up being man's world." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



119' 



FM8 
Subject: Articles of Religion 

Petitions: 1907-FM-OO-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence since this requires constitution- 
al change. 

"By inserting the following new 
paragraph in Part 11 of the Discipline, 
preceding the present Par. 67: 

"Article l.-(K)D 

"The creator of all things visible and 
invisible, having infinite power, wisdom, 
goodness, and love, God reveals himself 
as the three persons of the Trinity- 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, each dis- 
tinct but inseparable from the other. 

"Article 2.-JESUS CHRIST 

"Jesus Christ is truly God and truly 
man in whom the divine and human na- 
tures are perfectly and inseparably 
united. He is the eternal Word made 
flesh, the only begotten Son of the 
Father, conceived by the Holy Spirit and 
bom of the Virgin Mary. He lived, 
taught, suffered, was crucified, buried, 
and rose from the dead in his body to be 
with God the Father in heaven. He is 
the eternal Savior and mediator who in- 
tercedes for us imtil his return at the 
last day to judge all people. 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



155 



"Article 3.--THE HOLY SPIRIT 

"The Holy Spirit comes from the 
Father and the Son, and is one sub- 
stance, m^esty, glory, and being with 
them. He convinces the world of sin, of 
righteousness, and of judgment. He com- 
forts, sustains, and empowers the faith- 
ful. His gifts to the church are varied, 
for the edification of believers for the 
work of ministry. 

"Article 4. -THE BIBLE 

"The Holy Bible contains all things 
necessary to salvation. It is to be 
received through the Holy Spirit as the 
true rule and guide for faith and prac- 
tice. Whatever is not contained therein, 
nor proved thereby, is not required of 
any person as an article of faith, nor as 
necessaiy to salvation. 

"Article 5. -SIN 

"Sin is the corruption of the nature of 
every person by which we have turned 
away from original righteousness and 
are inclined to evil. Unless a person is 
bom again, through the grace of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, that person remains 
in sin and cannot see the kingdom of 
God. 

"Article 6.- JUSTIFICATION 

"Penitent sinners are justified or reck- 
oned as righteous before God through 
faith in J.esus Christ alone, and not 
through works or goodness. By trusting 
Christ, being justified thereby, and 
receiving the Holy Spirit, we receive 
rebirth, renewal in righteousness, and 
reconciliation to God. Justification does 
not deliver us from infirmities and mis- 
takes nor from the possibility of further 
sin. After receiving the Holy Spirit we 
may depart from grace and fall into sin, 
and, by the grace of God, rise again and 
amend our lives. 

"Article 7.-SANCTIFICATION 

"Sanctification follows justification 
and leads those who have been born 
again, through cleansing from sin in 
their thoughts, words, and acts, and as- 
surance of their salvation into a life in 
accordance with God's will. Sanctifica- 
tion leads the believer toward righteous- 
ness, holiness, and Christian perfection. 

"Article 8.-AT0NEMENT 

"The offering of Christ on the cross is 
that perfect redemption and satisfaction 
for all sins of the whole world, and no 
other or further satisfaction or atone- 
ment for sin is required. Through this 
act God was in Christ reconciling the 
world to himself. 

"Article 9. -FREE WILL 

"AU persons are inclined to evil and 
cannot come to God by their own 
natural will, strength, works, or 



righteousness. However, having received 
the grace of God in Christ and the 
power of the Holy Spirit, we are respon- 
sible in freedom to exercise will for good 
works pleasing to God. 

"Article lO.-GOOD WORKS 
"Good works are those actions pleas- 
ing and acceptable to God which spring 
from a true and living faith. Although 
good works cannot save us or atone for 
our sins, yet they are pleasing and ac- 
ceptable to God, for through and by 
them faith is made evident. 
"Article ll.-THE CHURCH 
"The church is the community of all 
true believers in Jesus Christ as Lord 
and Savior. It is the redemptive fellow- 
ship in which the Word of God is faith- 
fully preached by those divinely called, 
the sacraments are duly administered ac- 
cording to Christ's own appointment, 
and, under the discipline of the Holy 
Spirit, church order is maintained for 
worship, the edification of believers, and 
the redemption of the world. 
"Article 12.-THE SACRAMENT 
"The sacraments are outward and 
visible signs of an inward and spiritual 
grace which comes not from the world 
but from God. Two sacraments are or- 
dained by Christ our Lord-baptism and 
the Lord's Supper. 

"Baptism signifies repentance, forgive- 
ness of sin, the new birth, and entry into 
Christian discipleship through the 
church. The baptism of young children 
is to be retained so that they be nur- 
tured and led to personal acceptance of 
Christ and by profession of faith con- 
firm their baptism. 

"The Lord's Supper is a memorial and 
remembrance of the suffering and death 
of Christ and a token of love within the 
church as the body of Christ. Those who 
in faith eat the broken bread and drink 
the blessed cup partake of the body and 
blood of Christ in a spiritual manner 
until he comes. 

"Article 13.-PUBUC WORSHIP 
"Worship of God in the company of 
believers is the duty and privilege of 
believers who bow in adoration, dedica- 
tion, and submission. Worship is essen- 
tial to the life of the church and the 
assembling of the congregation together 
is necessary to Christian fellowship and 
growth. The order of public worship 
need not be the same in all places, but 
shall be in a language and form under- 
stood by the people, consistent with the 
Holy Scriptures. 

"Sunday is that day set aside for 
private and public worship, for rest from 
unnecessary work, and for spiritual im- 



provement, fellowship, and service. It 
commemorates the resurrection of 
Christ and is to be preserved by the civil 
community as a day of rest for the 
general welfare, when worship and min- 
istry may be unhindered to all. 
"Article 14.-CIVIL GOVERNMENT 
"As Christians we recognize the 
protection under which we reside. 
Governments derive their powers from 
the sovereign God, and should therefore 
be responsible to God for the protection 
of religious, civil and human rights. 
Christians have a duty to give moral 
strength and purpose to their respective 
governments through godly, righteous, 
and sober living. 

"Article 15. -THE JUDGMENT 
"All men stand under the righteous 
judgment of God both now and in the 
last day. 

"Article 16.-PR0PERTY 
"God is the owner of all things. 
Property is given to the church and to 
Christians as a divine stewardship for 
the manifestation of Christian love and 
to promote the cause of Christ in the 
world. All forms of property are to be 
held in solemn trust and used responsib- 
ly for human good and the propagation 
of the Gospel under the rule of God." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



120 



FA15 
Subject: Retain Par. 906.12 

Petitions: 137-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 84 
For 69; Against 15; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
Petition as printed on p. C-89 of the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



120 



FA 15 (Minority Report) 
Subject: Paragraph 906.12 

Petitions: 137-FA-906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 
For ; Against ; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend conciurence with this 
petition as printed on page C-89 of the 
Advance DCA with the addition of the 
following sentence: 

Because we are a church of in- 
formed faith, and because we hold 
a diversity of opinions, this 
paragraph is not to be interpreted 
in a way that would curtail discus- 



156 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



sion or education about 
homosexuality within the church, 
its boards, agencies, committees, 
commissions, or councils. 

Signed by thirteen (13) members of 
the committee. 
{ ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



after division. Further amended by addi- 
tion of: This legislation shall take ef- 
fect upon a4Joumment of the 1988 
General Conference. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Pages in Advance DCA: C-78 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: 4/28/88 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



121 con 

Subject: Election of 
Secretary-Designate 

Petitions: 1580-CO-604-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 83; Present 76 
For 71; Against 5; Not voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

This committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 



125 C09 

Subject: Election of 
Secretary-Designate to General 
Conference 

Petitions: 2161-CO-604-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 83; Present 77 
For 68; Against 9; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 



130* 



LC 



122 



C06 

Subject: Bishops to be assigned to 
one conference only 

Petitions: 1535-CO-505-D$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 83; Present 73 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



123 



COlO 

Subject: Election of 
Secretary-Designate 

Petitions: 1995-CO-604-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 83; Present 72 
For 67; Against 5; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



124 coi 

Subject: Bishops in Jurisdictions 

Petitions: 84-CO-505-D$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-60 
Membership 83; Present 73 
For 54; Against 16; Not Voting 3 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence as it is now printed in the Ad- 
vance DCA, amended by deletion of 
phrase: 

i and pro'ridod further to end of sen- 
tence. Replace semicolon with period 



126* 



LC 



Subject: Board of Trustees-Powers 
and Limitations 

Petitions: 1178-LC-2532-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



127* HES 

Subject: Joint Committee on 
Stewardship 

Petitions: 1051-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Recommends concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



128* HE23 

Subject: Purpose of GBHEM 

Petitions: 831-HE-1504-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-110 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Recommends concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



129' 



HE26 
Subject: Conference BHECM 

Petitions: 791-HE-731-D 



Subject: Local Church Board of 
Trustees 

Petitions: 156-LC-2531-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: 4/27/88 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / ^ ^ Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 1 Q 1 



GM9 

Subject: Purpose of National 
Division 

Petitions: 588-GM-1413-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-106 
Membership 119; Present 107 
For 107; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: 4/27/88 

The committee voted concurrence 
with the petition as printed. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



132' 



GM7 

Subject: Church and Community 
Workers 

Petitions: 2475-GM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Resolution; see 

text below 

Membership 119; Present 107 

For 107; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: 4/27/88 

The committee voted concurrence. 
"RESOLUTION 

•TO: MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL 
CONFERENCE, The United Methodist 
Church, St. Louis, Missouri 

"SUBJECT: Increased Use of Church 
and Community Workers 
"RATIONALE: 

"Whereas, during the past quadren- 
nium the National Division of the 
General Board of Global Ministries has 
shown commendable progress in finan- 
cially supporting and in deploying addi- 
tional church and community workers 
to serve as national missionaries of the 
church; and 

"Whereas, for many years Church and 
Community Ministry has proven itself to 
be an effective response of national mis- 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



157 



sionaiy outreach for The United 
Methodist Church in rural areas that 
have needed caring and creative leader- 
ship; and 

"Whereas, church and community 
workers as 'national' missionaries have 
numerous skills that have enriched 
Christian ministry in town and country 
communities where personal, family, 
and community crises have existed; and 

"Whereas, rural America continues to 
be in great transition due to crises being 
faced by family farmers, the loss of in- 
dustrial employment opportunities, and 
the break up of rural communities; 

"Therefore, be it resolved that the 
General Conference direct the National 
Division through the General Board of 
Global Ministries to increase the num- 
ber of church and community workers; 
and 

"Be it further resolved that special at- 
tention be given to assigning church and 
community workers to work closely with 
cooperative parish ministries and dis- 
tricts in order to provide leadership, min- 
istering skills, and other supports to: 

"- local churches located in rural com- 
munities that are experiencing high 
levels of transition; 

"- the 'new' poor in rural communities; 

"- the initiation of economic develop- 
ment alternatives; and 

"Be it further resolved that the Nation- 
al Division make every effort to raise the 
salaiy of the church and community 
workers to a more commensurate level." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



133^ 



MN23 

Subject: Candidacy for Ordained 
Ministry 

Petitions: 525-MN-404-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 89; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: 4/28/88 

The committee recommends referral 
to the Division of Ordained Ministry of 
the General Board of Higher Education 
and Ministry. 

Insert after Paragraph 404.4 the fol- 
lowing new paragraph: 

5. In circumstances in which a 
Pastor-Parish Relations Commit- 
tee or Charge Conference declines 
to recommend a candidate for cer- 
tification and evidence of 
prejudice due to racism or sexism 
exists, the candidate and/or his or 
her pastor may appeal to the dis- 
trict Committee on Ordained Mini- 
stry. Upon investigation of the 



circumstances, the district Commit- 
tee on Ordained Ministry may set 
aside the negative recommenda- 
tion of the Pastor-Parish Relations 
Committee or Charge Conference 
and proceed to certify the can- 
didate, provided that all other re- 
quirements of paragraphs 404.2, .3, 
.4, and 749 are observed. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



134 



MN19 

Subject: In-Depth Study of 
US/USSR Relations 
Petitions: 486-MN-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-18 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 92; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends referral 
to Council of Bishops. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



135 



MN9 

Subject: Appointment of Interim 
Pastors 

Petitions: 13 10-MN-436-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 77; Against 11; Not voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Add new 463.3 Interim appoint- 
ments may be made: To charges 
that have special transitional 
needs or to charges whose pastor is 
on sabbatical leave. The committee 
recommends concurrence as amended. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



136 MNIO 

Subject: Appointment of Interim 

Pastors 

Petitions: 1728-MN-436-D, 1975-MN- 

436-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: 

Membership 98; Present 89 

For 89; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of 1310 MN 436 D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



137* 



MNll 
Subject: Responsibilities of Bishops 

Petitions: 1577-MN-514-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 92; Agamst 0; Not Voting 



Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recottunends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



138 



MN14 

Subject: Presidential Duties 

Petitions: 575-MN-515-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-61 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 91; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence as printed in Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



139 MN15 

Subject: Presidential Duties 

Petitions: 1985-MN-515-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 90; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Addas: 

515.2 To provide general over- 
sight for the fiscal and program 
operations of the annual con- 
ference(s). This may include spe- 
cial inquiry into the work of 
agencies to assure that the annual 
conference and general church 
policies and procedures are fol- 
lowed. 

Committee reconmiends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



140 



HE3 

Subject: Study Commission on 
Models of Theological Education 
and Patterns of Ministry 

Petitions: 947-HE-3000-S$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-1-67 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Recommend that both the petition 
and this addition be referred to the 
General Board of Higher Education and 
Ministry for study with the request that 
the board be in consultation with the 
University Senate, the Commission on 
Religion and Race, and AUMTS to con- 
sider developing new models of theologi- 
cal education in light of the needs of the 
multiracial/multiethnic church. 

Substitute for (D-1-67, 68): Study 
Commission for Models of 
Theological Education and Pat- 
terns of Ministry 



158 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



Whereas, The United Methodist 
Church is an inclusive, multiracial, mul- 
tiethnic body of Christ; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist 
Chiu-ch is in mission in the name of 
Jesus Christ wherever its members are 
found and human beings live; and 

Whereas, A key element of the mis- 
sion of The United Methodist Church is 
found in the pastoral, prophetic, and 
equipping work of its ordained mini- 
sters; and 

Whereas, Effective ministry is called 
from diverse communities of faith and 
competent ministry must speak to, serve 
with and minister in diverse fields of 
mission; and 

Whereas, Those prepared for ordained 
ministry in one cultural context are 
severely limited in ministering in a mul- 
ticultural setting; and 

Whereas, The General Commission 
on Religion and Race has already within 
its program and budget a visit during 
every quadrennium to each United 
Methodist seminaiy to monitor its racial 
inclusiveness in program and cur- 
riculum; and 

Whereas, Each United Methodist 
seminaiy is regularly visited by repre- 
sentatives of the Division of the Or- 
dained Ministry and teams from the 
Association of Theological Schools in 
the United States and Canada and 
regional accrediting bodies examining 
seminaiy programs, including racial in- 
clusiveness; and 

Whereas, The allocation of funds from 
the Ministerial Education Fund to each 
of the thirteen seminaries is, in part, 
determined by a factor of racial inclusive- 
ness; and 

Whereas, The seminaries are com- 
mitted to continued progress in prepar- 
ing persons for ministry in racial and 
ethnic communities and in multicultural 
settings; 

Be it resolved that the General Com- 
mission on Religion and Race conduct in 
each seminaiy during the quadrennium 
a consultation involving students and 
faculty and representatives of con- 
stituent groups from White American, 
Asian American, Black American, 
Hispanic American, and Native 
American persons. 

And be it further resolved that the 
aim of this consultation is to enhance 
and facilitate the ability of the semi- 
naries to prepare persons for ministry in 
racial-ethnic communities and in multi- 
cultural settings. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



141* HE15 

Subject: University Senate 

Petitions: 853-HE-1520-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Amended as follows: 

Add new subparagraphs to Par. 1520: 
An institution which chooses to disaf- 
filiate with The United Methodist 
Church for any reason s uch a s voluntari 
ly dosing or changing missions should 
shall: a) inform the University Senate 
as soon as possible after discussions 
begin concerning disaffiliation; b) in- 
form all appropriate United Methodist 
judicatories; c) seek technical and legal 
assistance from the Division of Higher 
Education regarding fiduciary issues. 

The Senate shall publish annually, 
with its list of United Methodist-af- 
filiated institutions, the names of institu- 
tions of other historic Methodist 
churches which wish to participate in re- 
search projects, the insurance program, 
and technical services of the General 
Board of Higher Education and Mini- 
stiy. Such institutions shall be desig- 
nated as "associate" institutions. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



142 



MN2 
Subject: The Itinerant System 

Petitions: 735-MN-436-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-53 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 88; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

143 MN3 

Subject: Consecration of Bishops 

Petitions: 536-MN-521-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-61 
Membership 98; Present 82 
For 81; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

144 MN7 

Subject: Disposition of Complaint 

Petitions: 762-MN-513-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-61 
Membership 98; Present 93 



For 91; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee reconmiends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



145 MN8 

Subject: Sabbatical Leave 
Following Complaint 

Petitions: 2239-MN-513-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 93 
For 85; Against 7; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



146 



LC 



Subject: Local Church Board of 
Trustees 

Petitions: 916-LC-2525-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 79; Against 4; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



147' 



LC 



Subject: Local Church Board of 
Trustees-Qualifications 

Petitions: 1171-LC-2524-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



148* LC 

Subject: Local Church Board of 
Trustees-Organization and 
Membership 

Petitions: 1175-LC-2529-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



149* LC. 

Subject: Charge or Cooperative 
Parish Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 1173-LC-2527D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



159 



Membership 94 Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



150 



L.C. 

Subject: Chair of Committee on 
Nominations and Personnel 

Petitions: 1329-LC-267-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Presents? 
For 79; Against 1; Not Voting 7 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of 45-LC-267-D 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



151 



L.C. 



Subject: Board of Trustees of 
Cooperative Parish 

Petitions: 428-LC-2527-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94 Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



152^ 



L.C. 



Subject: Small Membership 
Churches 

Petitions: 6<39-LC-2548-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-126 
Membership 94 Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



153 



* 



L.C. 



Subject: Board of Trustees Report 
to Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1189-LC-2547-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-126 
Membership 94 Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



154* Lc 

Subject: Removal of Local Church 
Trustees 

Petitions: 1176-LC-2530-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 



For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



159* 



155' 



L.C. 

Subject: Meetings of Local Church 
Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 1177-LC-2531-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-123 
Membership 94; Present 83 
For 83; Agamst 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



156 



HE27 

Subject: Higher Ethical Standards 
for Athletics at United Methodist 
related Colleges and Universities. 

Petitions: 2490-HE-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



157 



GA 



Subject: Church's Role in Care for 
Older Adults 

Petitions: 334-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



158 



ij 



Subject: Reconciliation with 
Missionary Society 

Petitions: 435-IJ-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-15 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 52; Against 7; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



H£9 

Subject: Purpose and Objectives of 
University Senate 

Petitions: 852-HE-1518-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



160* HEll 

Subject: University Senate 

Petitions: 851-HE-1517-D, 850-HE-1517- 

D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 

Membership 83; Present 74 

For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



161 



GA 



Subject: Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 333-GA-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-13, D-2-14 

Membership 82; Present 75 

For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



162* GA 

Subject: In Support of Older Adult 
Ministries Report 

Petitions: 2465-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries report (petition 1194 
and 652). 

"The CouncU on Older Adult Mini- 
stries, Tennessee Annual Conference, 
does hereby endorse the report from the 
Task Force for Older Adults, and ap- 
proves its Biblical-Theological State- 
ment, its characteristics of a model 
ministry by, with, for older adults, and 
its recommendations for implementa- 
tion in the new quadrenium. 

"We wholeheartedly recommend its 
passage along with the proposed budget 
for implementation." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



160 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



163' 



GA 



Subject: Advisory Coordinating 
Committee on Older Adult 
Ministries 

Petitions: 2452-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries report (Petition 652). 
The following resolution was passed 
at the 1987 session of the Tennessee An- 
nual Conference and is hereby sub- 
mitted to the 1988 General Conference: 
"WHEREAS, the 1984 General Con- 
ference appointed a Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries; and 

"WHEREAS, this task force was 
charged with the responsibility of for- 
mulating a recommendation to the 1988 
General Conference specifying the most 
effective means of enhancing ministry 
by, with, and for older adults; and 

"WHEREAS, the Task Force on Older 
Adults has developed a recommendation 
to create an advisory coordinating com- 
mittee on older adult ministries that 
would serve as both a consultant and ad- 
vocate for older adults. 

"BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, 
that the Tennessee Conference send a 
petition to the 1988 session of the 
General Conference affirming the crea- 
tion of an Advisory /Coordinating Com- 
mittee on Older Adult Ministries." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



164 GA 

Subject: Task Force on Older Adult 
Ministries 

Petitions: 1355-GA-3000-R $ 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of the petition 652 from 
the Task Force on Older Adult Mini- 
stries. 

"BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that 
this Annual Conference support the 
General Task Force proposed budget be 
accepted by the General Council on 
Finance and Administration and ac- 
countable to the General Council on 
Ministries in cooperation with general 
agencies. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 649-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

"BE IT RESOLVED: We, the par- 
ticipants and leaders of the Virginia Con- 
ference Senior Adult Assembly, the 
United Methodist Church, meeting at 
Blackstone, Virginia, on September 21- 
24, 1987, petition you as follows: 

"1. That changes, or adjustments be 
made in Disciplinary language and 
philosophy which will give the same em- 
phasis to older adult ministries as is 
given to children, youth, young adult, 
and adult ministries; and 

"2. That all program agencies be 
directed to adopt plans, policies, and 
materials which will provide added op- 
portunities for ministry by, with, and for 
older adults in each local church, dis- 
trict, and annual conferences; and 

"3. That all Boards and Agencies of 
the general church undertake the inten- 
tional coordinations of these "by-with- 
and-for" goals by the creating of an 
Advisory /Coordinating Committee on 
Older Adult Ministries for the general 
church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



166 iJi 

Subject: Report on Pan-Metho«iist 
Cooperation 

Petitions: 1016-IJ-3000M 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-57 
Membership 72; Present 64 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence with editorial correc- 
tions: first two lines at top of third 
column to top of second colimin. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



167 



IJ2 

Subject: Pan-Methodist 
Cooperation-Recommendations 

Petitions: 971-IJ-3000R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-57 
Membership 72; Present 66 
For 66; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



168 U3 

Subject: Delete Par. 2007 

Petitions: 564-IJ-2007D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-1-18 
Membership 72; Present 57 
For 56; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



169 GA 

Subject: Adopt and Implement the 
Older Adult Ministries Report 

Petitions: 1404-GA-3000-R$ 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 82; Present 75 

For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of the petitions from the 
Task Force on Older Adult Ministries 
(652 and 1194). 

"The adult Sunday school class of Con- 
cord-St. Andrew's UMC in Bethesda, 
Maryland, at its regular meeting held on 
January 17, 1988, voted unanimously to, 
and does hereby, petition the 1988 
General Conference of the United 
Methodist Church to ADOPT and to IM- 
PLEMENT the -'Report of the Task 
Force on Older Adult Ministries in the 
United States and Puerto Rico to the 
1988 General Conference.'" 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



170 GA 

Subject: In Support of Report from 
Task Force on Older Achilt 
Ministries 

Petitions: 1392-GA-3000-R$ 

Pages in Advance DCA: Unpublished in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 82; Present 75 

For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of the Task Force on 
Older Adult Ministries petition 652. 

"Whereas the population of older 
adults is a swiftly growing segment of 
Methodism, and the 1985-88 National 
Study Task Force on Older Adult Mini- 
stries recommends ongoing coordination 
of ministries by, with, and for older 
adults, we of the Westfield First UMC at 
Westfield, New Jersey, on June 28, 1987, 
support the report of the National Task 
Force on Older Adult Ministries request- 
ing the creation of an Advisory/Coor- 



« 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



161 



dinating Committee for the 1989-92 
quadrennium. 

"The purpose of this committee shall 
be to assess, coordinate, and work with 
the general agencies to enhance the min- 
istries by, for and with older adults. 

"Fimding for this committee shall be 
$50,000 per year for the 1989-92 quad- 
rennium, to be funded by the General 
Conference on Finance and Administra- 
tion, and administered and accountable 
to the General Council on Ministries in 
cooperation with the general program 
agencies." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



171 



IJ4 

Subject: Pan-Methodist 
Cooperation 

Petitions: 966 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-1-21 
Membership 72; Present 57 
For 56; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



172 



CE2 

Subject: $100M Scholarship 
Endowment Fund 

Petitions: 1080-HE-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: F-58 
Membership 83; Present 76 
For 75; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



173' 



HE4 

Subject: Financing Higher 
Education 

Petitions: 848-HE-1516-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 
Membership 83; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



174* HE5 

Subject: Ministerial Education 
Fund 

Petitions: 840-HE-1509-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 75 



For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Conamittee recommends concurrence. 



Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



( ) Concurrence ( 



175 



HE7 

Subject: Hawaii Loa College 
Support 

Petitions: 357-HE-3000-R$ 
Pages m Advance DCA: D-2-16 
Membership 83; Present 75 
For 74; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends referral back 
to GBHEM. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



176 HE12 

Subject: University Senate 

Petitions: 849-HE-1517-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 71; Against 1; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



177 



HE13 
Subject: University Senate 

Petitions: 165-HE-1520-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 72; Agamst 2; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

178* HE14 

Subject: University Senate 

Petitions: 422-HE-1517-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



179 



* 



LC 



Subject: Officers of the L.C. 
Council on Ministries 

Petitions: 43-LC-258-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-37 
Membership 94; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 



180 



FA43 

Subject: Administrative 
Responsibilities of GCFA (Par. 907) 

Petitions: 1144-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 78; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-89 in the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



181* FA44 
Subject: Administrative 
Responsibilities 

Petitions: 1119-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-89 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-89 in the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Loss of Pension Annuity 
Due to Pastoral Charge Not Paying 
Apportionments. 

Petitions: 2023-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which proposes deletion of 
Par. 736.4. d and e which provide for a 
lien being placed against a pastor's pen- 
sion for nonpayment of apportionments. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



183^ 



FA18 
Subject: Proportional Payment 

Petitions: 1326-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 24; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which attempts to 
eliminate unconscionable actions of the 



162 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



General Conference such as placing 
liens on the pastor's pension for nonpay- 
ment of apportionments. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



184 rAi9 

Subject: Proportional Payment 

Petitions: 961-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 76 
For 76; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We voted concurrence with this peti- 
tion that eliminates a pastor from receiv- 
ing a bonus or other supplementary 
income that would defeat proportional 
payments to pastors. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

185* FA20 

Subject: Proportional Payment 

Petitions: 2180-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We voted nonconcurrence with this 
petition that requests the elimination of 
Par. 736.4 PROPORTIONAL PAY- 
MENT. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



186' 



FA21 
Subject: Delete Paragraph 736.4 

Petitions: 126-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-83 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence on 
this petition that requests elimination of 
Par. 736.4 PROPORTIONAL PAY- 
MENTS. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



187* FA22 

Subject: Conference Board of 

Pensions 

Petitions: 1872-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Agamst 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We voted concurrence to this petition 
which makes it possible for persons 



receiving pensions benefits to serve on 
the conference board of pensions. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

188* FA23 

Subject: Conference Board of 

Pensions 

Petitions: 1783-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition in favor of Petition 1872- 
FA-736-D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



189* FA24 

Subject: Conference Board of 

Pensions 

Petitions: 2024-FA-736-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 78 
For 78; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition in favor of Petition 1872- 
FA-736-D. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



190* FA25 

Subject: Ministers From Other 
Annual Conferences and Other 
Methodist Denominations 

Petitions: 952-FA-425-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition that places the responsibility for 
enrollment of the pastor in the Mini- 
sterial Pension Plan and the Com- 
prehensive Protection Plan on the 
Board of Pensions of the Annual Con- 
ference. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



191 GA 

Subject: Advisory Coordinating 
Committee for Older Adult 
Ministries 

Petitions: 335-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Agamst 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 



Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence in favor of Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries (Petition 652). 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



192 GA 

Subject: Advisory Committee for 
Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 336-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

193 GA 

Subject: Permanent Organization 
for Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 337-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



194 GA 

Subject: Commission to Study 
Older Adult Ministries 

Petitions: 339-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 75 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 22, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence 

'The Rio Grande Conference in its 
third plenary session of its fifty -eighth 
annual session on June 13, 1987 (1987 
Journal, pages 32 and 192) adopted the 
following resolution to be submitted as a 
petition to the 1988 General (Conference 
of the United Methodist Church: La Con- 
ferencia del Rio Grande apoya la 
creacion de una Comision Cuadrienial 
de Estudio de Asuntos de Personas 
Mayores con representacion adecuada de 
las jurisdicciones, el Cloncilio de Obispos, 
las Juntas (jenerales de Discipulado, 
Iglesia y Sociedad y Ministerios Globales 
y que sea inclusiva de personas mayores 
(mas de 55 anos de edad) de distintos 
grupos etnicos y con un presupuesto 
anual de $50,0()0 con el fin de hacer 
analisis del grupo que esta creciendo con 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



163 



mas rapidez en los EE. UU. y hacer 
recomendaciones a la Conferencia 
General de 1992 con respecto a mini- 
sterio por, con y a este grupo de per- 
sonas." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



195 GA 

Subject: Committee on Ministry to 
Older Adults 

Petitions: 338-GA-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: E-31 
Membership 82; Present 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Refund of Balance of 
Vested Pension Benefits of Former 
Participants - Lump Sum Pay-outs 

Petitions: 293-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition that would authorize a 
refimd of the balance of the vested pen- 
sion benefits of former participants of 
the Plan upon request and as eligible. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



197* 



IJ5 

Subject: Pan-Methodist 
Cooperation 

Petitions: 568 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-1-21 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 61; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



198 



U6 



Subject: An Ecumenical Decade: 
Churches in Solidarity With 
Women 1988-1998 

Petitions: 627-IJ-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-68 ff 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 57; Against 3; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 



Insert new par. #3 and re-order, so 
that it reads: 

b. Women's visions and perspectives, 
concerns and commitments related to 
the ecimienical study, "Justice, Peace 
and the Integrity of Creation." 

a Women doing theology and sharing 
spirituality: how can we enable an in- 
tegrated process of study, sharing, ac- 
ting and celebrating? 

2. Produce educational resources and 
programs on the marginalization and op- 
pression of women, their struggle for 
human dignity and a better life, and 
their creative contribution in theology, 
spirituality and ministry. 

3. Encourage all levels of the 
church - general, jurisdictional, an- 
nual conference, district, and local 
chiu"ch - be encouraged to par- 
ticipate in the Ecumenical Decade 
by studying the root causes of 
sexism, exploring ways to increase 
participation of women in all 
aspects of church life, and be open 
to ways of addressing injustices 
to\^ard women through the church 
and society. 

4. Urge all commissions and program 
agencies to study and implement as ap- 
propriate the priorities of the "Forward 
Looking Strategies"; 

5. Increase the involvement of racial, 
ethnic and national minority women as 
well as other oppressed women; 

6. Improve relationships with women 
suffering under sexism, racism and cas- 
teism and support the World Council of 
Churches' Women Under Racism 
Programme; 

7. Continue efforts which both the 
church and the society accomplished 
diuing the United Nations Decade for 
Women towards the goals of equality, 
development and peace; 

8. Work for women to participate 
equally with men in the decisions of the 
church and the society concerning jus- 
tice and peace; 

9. Urge United Methodists to en- 
courage governments to commit themsel- 
ves to appropriate action for the 
implementation of the strategies within 
the framework of their national develop- 
ment plans and programs; 

10. Monitor and be supportive of the 
continued emphasis on women by the 
United Nations and participate in all the 
United Nations arenas where Non- 
Govemmental organizations have poten- 
tial for influence; 

11. Support the "United Nations Con- 
vention on the Elimination of All Forms 
of Discrimination Against Women" and 



lu-ge United Methodists to work through 
local and national organizations to en- 
courage their governments not only to 
ratify but to implement the Convention. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



199* LIT 

Subject: Eciunenical Decade 

Petitions: 1260 

Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-69 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 60; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



200' 



IJ8 



Subject: Act of Covenanting 

Petitions: 1083 

Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-70 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 59; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



201 



IJ9 



Subject: Ecumenical Decade 

Petitions: 628 

Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-16 
Membership 72; Present 61 
For 60; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 27, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



) Nonconcurrence Date / 



202' 



FA42 

Subject: Authority of General 
Conference 

Petitions: 1193-FA-3000-R 
Pages m Advance DCA: C-127 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-127 in the Ad- 
vance DCA 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



203* FA40 
Subject: Episcopal Fund 

Petitions: 263 1-FA-925-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 79 



164 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition asking that ceiling of 
$50,000 be placed on bishop's salaries. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



204* FA41 

Subject: Delete Par. 923 - Episcopal 

Fund 

Petitions: 2630.-FA-923-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend nonconcurrence with 
this petition which asks for the deletion 
of Par. 923. This paragraph authorizes 
the GCFA to pay and, if necessary, bor- 
row to pay support for active bishops, 
retired bishops, and their dependents. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



205' 



FA39 

Subject: Compensation for Retired 
Bishops Recalled to Active Service 

Petitions: 915-FA-937-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-92 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-92 of the Ad- 
vanced DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



206 



MN24 

Subject: Central Clearing Agency 
for Clergy Transfers 

Petitions: 485-MN-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-18 
Membership 98; Present 92 
For 86; Against 5; Not Voting 1 
Date: 
The committee recommends noncon- 



) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



207 



MN 

Subject: Portland Affirmation 

Petitions: 1285-MN-306-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 91 
For 84; Against 1; Not Voting 6 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



208* C08 

Subject: Determining Number of 
Bishops to be Elected 

Petitions: 1476-CO-505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 83; Present 73 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Compensation of Bishops 
Relieved of Episcopal Duties 

Petitions: 1151-FA-931-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-92 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-92 of the Ad- 
vance DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



212' 



210 



CS2 

Subject: Social Principles Par. 
71.G. - Abortion 

Petitions: 1424-CS-71-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 104; Present 100 
For 92; Against 6; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence to retain 71. G. in the Book of Dis- 
cipline and add the following: 

After the sentence which concludes 
"...and in such cases support the legal op- 
tion of abortion under proper medical 
procedures." Add: We cannot affirm 
abortion as an acceptable means of 
birth control. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



211* CSIO 

Subject: Sexual Harassment 

Petitions: 2376-CS-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: None 
Membership 104; Present 95 
For 95; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee voted nonconcurrence 
to the petition in favor of Petition 620- 
CS-3000-R Report CS9. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



FA37 

Subject: Bishops' Compensation 
and Expense Allowances 

Petitions: 1149-FA-924-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-92 
Membership 91; Present 79 
For 79; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

We recommend concurrence with this 
petition as printed on p. C-92 of the Ad- 
vance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



213^ 



MN 

Subject: Limitation on Years of 
Service 

Petitions: 87-MN-518-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 83 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Petition to extend term of district su- 
perintendent to eight years, comprised 
of foiu--year terms, renewable once. 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of present Discipline. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

214* MN 

Subject: Consultation Process 

Petitions: 1398-MN-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 89; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Petition re: right to refuse a new mini 
ster. The committee recommends non- 
concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



215 



MN 

Subject: Personnel 

Petitions: 1013-MN-521-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 95 
For 95; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of 766-MN-521-D. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



216 Lc 

Subject: The Mission of the Church 

Petitions: 1034-LC- 103-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-29 
Membership 94; Present 89 
For 87; Against 2; Not Voting 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



165 



Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

Par. 103. Amend the first sentence of 
the first paragraph by addition as fol- 
lows: 

Par. 103. God's self-revelation in the 
life, death, and resurrection of Jesus 
Christ simmions the Church to mis s ion 
ministry in the world through witness 
by word and deed» in light of the 
Church's mission. (Par.) 

(The remainder of Par. 103 would 
remain unchanged.) 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

217* Lc 

Subject: Terminating Trustees 

Petitions: 2070-LC-2530-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: see text below 

Membership 94; Present 88 

For 87; Against 0; Not Voting 1 

Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 
"Proposed Paragraph 2530, Section 1 
"1. Should a trustee of a local church, 
who when elected a trustee was a mem- 
ber of that local church, cease to be a 
member of that local church, trusteeship 
therein shall automatically cease from 
the date the trustee ceases to be a mem- 
ber of the local church. Should a trustee 
of a local church, who when elected a 
trustee was a member of some other con- 
gregation of The United Methodist 
Church, cease to be a member of any 
local congregation of The United 
Methodist Church, trusteeship of the 
local church shall automatically cease 
from the date of membership termina- 
tion." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



218' 



LC 



Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 1459-LC-2529-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 86 
For 86; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

CJommittee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. Please delete the words e©ft- 
foronoo yoor in Par. 2529 (1) and 
substitute the words New Year since 
the new class on the board of trustees 
first takes office in the month of 
January and not June. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



219 LC 

Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 2065-LC-2524-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 78 
For 72; Against 5; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

Proposed Paragraph 2524: 

In each pastoral charge consisting of 
one local church there shall be a board 
of trustees, consisting of not fewer than 
three nor more than nine persons, at 
least one-third of whom shall be 
laywomen, each of whom shall be of 
legal age as determined by law and at 
least two-thirds of whom shall be mem- 
bers of the local church. The permis- 
sible one-third nonmembers may 
also include members of other 
local churches of The United 
Methodist Chiu-ch. By action of the 
Charge Conference the local church may 
limit the age of trustees to a maximum 
of seventy-two years of age. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



220 



MN 
Subject: Supervision 

Petitions: 765-MN-520-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 95 
For 82; Against 10; Not Voting 3 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Par. 520.1: Amend by adding in last 
line after the word pas/ors' and 
diaconal ministers' priorities for min- 
istry. 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



221 



LC 



Subject: The People of God 

Petitions: 1299-LC-107-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 85 
For 83; Against 2; Not voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommend nonconcur- 
rence. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED 
that Par. 107 of the 1984 Book of Dis- 
cipline, which reads: 

"The people of CJod are the Church 
made visible in the world. It is they who 
must convince the world of the reality of 
the gospel or leave it unconvinced. 
There can be no evasion or delegation of 



this responsibUity; the Church is either 
faithful as a witnessing and serving com- 
munity, or it loses its vitality and its im- 
pact on an unbelieving world." 

BE AMENDED BY ADDITION OF 
THE FOLLOWING: 

By means of all its expressions, 
including business meetings, per- 
sonnel matters, study classes, and 
planning sessions, the Church shall 
seek to perfect its love of God and 
neighbor. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



222 LC 

Subject: Board of Trustees 

Petitions: 2066-LC-2524-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 66 
For 53; Agamst 11; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

That Par. 2524 of the Book of Dis- 
cipline be amended by deleting the final 
sentence- 

By action of the Chargo Conforonco 
the local church may limit the ago of 
tru6too6 to a maximum of covonty two 
years of ago . 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



223 



LC 

Subject: Election and 
Responsibilities of Lay Leader 

Petitions: 1026-LC-251-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 82 
For 75; Against 7; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
as amended. 

Between the words primary and repre- 
sentative add the word lay. 

The second part of the petition now 
reads, "Out of the general ministry of 
each local church (p. 105) there shall be 
elected by the charge conference a lay 
leader who shall function as the primary 
lay representative of the laity in that 
local church and shall have the follow- 
ing responsibUities:" 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence DaU / 



224 LC 

Subject: Membership of Board of 
Trustees 

Petitions: 1805-LC-2525-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: see text below 

Membership 94; Present 70 

For 37; Against 33; Not Voting 



166 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

"In each pastoral charge consisting of 
one local church there shall be a 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, consisting of 
not fewer than three nor more than 
nine persons, at least one-third of whom 
shall be laywomen, and at least one- 
third of whom shall be laymen, 
each of whom shall be of legal age as 
determined by law and at least two- 
thirds of whom shall be members of The 
United Methodist Church. By action of 
the Charge Conference the local church 
may limit the age of trustees to a maxi- 
mum of seventy-two years of age." 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



225* MN 

Subject: Personnel 

Petitions: 766-MN-521-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 95 
For 95; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

The conunittee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



226 



MN 

Subject: Responsibilities of 
District Superintendents 

Petitions: 88-MN-519-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 86 
For 76; Against 10; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of present Discipline. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



227 MN 

Subject: Responsibilities of 
District Superintendents 

Petitions: 764-MN-519-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 85 
For 67; Against 16; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



228 MN 

Subject: Limitetions of Years of 
Service 

Petitions: 1268-MN-518-D 



Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Par. 518 be changed to read: 
518: Limitations of Years of Ser- 
vice.-An elder may not be ap- 
pointed a district superintendent 
for more than eight years in any 
consecutive ten years. No elder 
shall serve as district superinten- 
dent more than twice. In addition, 
consideration shall be given to the 
nature of superintendency as 
described in para. 501-502. 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of present Discipline. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



229* MN 

Subject: Commitment to 
Inclusiveness 

Petitions: 397-MN-519-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-62 
Membership 98; Present 84 
For 84; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Add a new paragraph after 519.2 )by 
encouraging their personal commit- 
ment to inclusiveness in the life of 
the chiu"ch; The committee recom- 
mends concurrence as amended. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



230^ 



MN 

Subject: Supervision 
Petitions: 1863-MN-520-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 95 
For 95; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Petition to add to Par. 520.2. In situa- 
tions of apparent conflict of inter- 
est, a request may be made to the 
bishop by the cabinet, a district su- 
perintendent, a staff parish com- 
mittee, a pastor, or a diaconal 
minister for an alternate district 
superintendent to act as supervisor 
of a given clergy person if existing 
circumstances hinder the objec- 
tivity and/or effectiveness of a 
regular district superintendent. 
The bishop, upon consultation with 
the cabinet, shall determine 
whether there is conflict of inter- 
est and whether an alternate dis- 
trict superintendent needs to be 
appointed, and then act according- 
ly." 



The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of present Discipline. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

231 MN 

Subject: Retain Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 56-MN^02-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-46 
Membership 98; Present 93 
For 66; Against 27; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



231 MN (Minority Report) 
Subject: Far. 402.2 

Petitions: 56-MN-402-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-46 
Membership 98; Present 93 
For 66; Against 27; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Minority report recommends deletion 
ofpresent Par. 402.2 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
New 402.2 Ordained ministers of 
the church are responsible to em- 
body an acceptance of God's love 
through their example and their ad- 
ministration of Word, Sacrament, 
and Order. In doing this, they offer 
the world God's sovereign grace; 
they bear witness to Christ's call to 
love God and neighbor; and they 
demonstrate a Spirit-filled life of 
joy, gentleness, and self-control. 

Signers of Minority Report: Grayson 

Atha, Carol Roettmer Brewer, David A. 

GUes, Marcus Fang, Edward Iwamoto, 

David Kruse, Dean A. Lanning, Leon 

McKenzie, Sarah S. MUler, Sarrane 

O'DonneU, Sam PhUlips, Deborah L 

Pritts, Patricia A. Townsend, WUliam 0. 

Walker, Rosa Washington, Brenda West, 

Carroll Yingling, Jr., and Loretta Young 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



I 



232 



MN 
Subject: Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 60-MN-i02-D; 59-MN-402-D; 
58-MN-402-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-47 and these 
additional petitions: 1305-MN-402-D, 
2621-MN-3000-R, 1362-MN-400-D, 2231- 
MN-402-D, 933-MN-430-D, 1338-MN- 
400-D, 1331-MN-3000-R, 
1273-MN-3000-R, 1400-MN-3000-R, 
1500-MN-402-D, 1030-MN-3000-R, 1308- 
MN-402-D, 1850-MN-402-D, 1965-MN- 
402-D, 1964-MN-402-D, 1851-MN-402-D, 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



167 



1852-MN-402-D, 1718-MN-402-D, 1963- 
MN-402-D, 1633-MN-402-D, 2588-MN- 
3000-R, 2586-MN-3000-R, and 
2285-MN^02-D 
Membership 98; Present 90 
For 90; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



233* MN 

Subject: Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 1590-MN-2529-D, 2591-MN- 
3000-R, 1508-MN-3000-R, 1563-MN- 
3000-R, 1567-MN-3000-R, 
1720-MN-3000-R, 2612-MN-3000-R, 
1713-MN-3000-R, 2611-MN-3000-R, 
1716-MN-3000-R, 1272-MN-3000-R, 
1395-MN-3000-R, 1396-MN-3000-R, 
1397-MN-3000-R, 1394-MN-3000-R, 
1445-MN-402-D, 948-MN-3000-R, 2590- 
MN-3000-R, 1564-MN-3000-R, 2620-MN- 
3000-R, 2592-MN-3000-R, 
2624-MN-3000-R, 2625-MN-3000-R, 
2626-MN-3000-R, 2623-MN-3000-R, 
2610-MN-3000-R, 2609-MN-3000-R, 2615- 
MN-3000-R, 2616-MN-3000-R, 2614-MN- 
3000-R, 2613-MN-3000-R, 
1634-MN-3000-R, 1532-MN-3000-R, 
2581-MN-3000-R, 632-MN-3000-R, 2608- 
MN-3000-R, 1565-MN-3000-R, 1015-MN- 
404-D, 2617-MN-3000-R, 
2618-MN-3000-R, 2595-MN-3000-R, 
1723-MN-3000-R, 1307-MN-402-D, 1348- 
MN-402-D, 62-MN-402-D, 930-MN-412- 
D, 1022-MN-430-D, 1574-MN-423-D, 
2597-MN-3000-R, 2599-MN-3000-R, 
2598-MN-3000-R, 2605-MN-3000-R, 
2602-MN-3000-R, 2606-MN-3000-R, 
2607-MN-3000-R, 2603-MN-3000-R, 
2604-MN-3000-R, 2600-MN-3000-R, 
2596-MN-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-46, C-47 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 7 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
curence in favor of 56-MN = 402-D 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



234* MN 

Subject: Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 532-MN-402-D, 2141-MN-402- 
D, 2622-MN-3000-R, 717-MN-402-D, 57- 
MN-402-D, 466-MN-430-D, 
2646-MN^02-D, 2140-MN^02-D, 718- 
MN-102-D, 1715-MN-3000-S, 1849-MN- 
402-D, 1511-MN-402-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-46, C-47 
Membership 98; Present 89 



For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 7 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



235* MN 

Subject: Homosexuality 

Petitions: 2601-MN-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 90 
For 90; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Petition to amend Par. 402.2 
The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



239^ 



236 



* 



MN 

Subject: Homosexuality 

Petitions: 2593-MN-3000-R, 458-MN- 
404-D, 929-MN-408-D, 1968-MN-404-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 89 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 7 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

237* HE28 

Subject: Division of Chaplains and 

Related Ministries 

Petitions: 841-HE-1511-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
with amendment by deletion 

of the word induBtiy following institu- 
tions. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



238 



HE48 

Subject: Responsibilities to 
Institutions 

Petitions: 847-HE-1515-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



HE49 

Subject: Responsibilities to 
General and Annual Conferences 

Petitions: 421-HE-1514-D, 846-HE-1514- 

D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 and C-112 

Membership 83; Present 65 

For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 1 

For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee reconunends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



240 HE46 

Subject: Student Recognition Day 

Petitions: 275-HE-1515-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-113 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 62; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( ) Concurrence ( 



I Nonconcurrence Date / 



241 



FA59 

Subject: Transitional Funds 
Administered by Equitable 
Salaries Commission 

Petitions: 785-FA-722-D 
Pages m Advance DCA: C-74 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 77; Against 5; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence with petition 785-FA- 722-D as 
printed on p. C-74 of the Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) 



242* FA60 
Subject: Equitable Salaries 
"Support" Replacing 
"Compensation" 

Petitions: 1137-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-74 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence with petition 1137-FA-722-D as 
printed on p. C-74 of the Advance DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



243* FA61 

Subject: Equitable Salaries 

Petitions: 1139-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-74 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 



168 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence with petition 1139-FA-722-D as 
printed on p. C-74 of the Advance DCA. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



244 



MN 



Subject: Candidacy for Diaconal 
Ministry 

Petitions: 1961-MN-304-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: see text below 

Membership 98; Present 90 

For 66; Against 24; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Petition to amend Par. 304. 1 by ad- 
ding 

Since the practice of 
homosexuality is incompatible 
with Christian teaching, self- 
avowed, practicing homosexuals 
are not to be accepted as can- 
didates, consecrated as diaconal 
ministers, or appointed to serve in 
The United Methodist Church. 

The committee recommends noncon- 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

245* FA75 

Subject: Word Changes in 

"Ministerial Support" Section 

Petitions: 1366-FA-717-D, 1367-FA-718- 
D, 1368-FA-719-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence with the following petitions: 

#1366 Which would substitute The 
Episcopal Fund, the district super- 
intendents, the pension and 
benefits program of the annual con- 
ferences, and the equitable salary 
fund for bichope.MConforonco claimants 
m Par. 717. 

#1367 Which would substitute For 
the pension and benefits program 
of the annual conference for een- 
foronco claimante 

#1368 Which would substitute Epis- 
copal Fund for bi s hop s and The pen- 
sions and benefits program of the 
annual conference for conforonco 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



246 



Petitions: 837-HE-1506-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: Clll 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
as amended: 

Upon request to provide resources 
and technical assistance in higher educa- 
tion throughout the world in collabora- 
tion with tho churohoe involved 
churches of the Wesleyan tradition. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



247* HE50 

Subject: General Responsibilities 

of Division of Higher Education 

Petitions: 845-HE-1513-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: CI 12 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

Petition remains the same except in 
Par. 1513.4.f. Change the word relation 
sbi^ to relationships: 

To foster within educational institu- 
tions the highest educational standards, 
effective programs of church relation- 
ships, the soundest business practices... 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



248 



HE51 

Subject: Division of Higher 
Education 

Petitions: 420-HE-1513-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-112 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 61; Against 2; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



249 



HE55 

Subject: Responsibilities of 
GBHEM 



HE41 
Subject: Peace Colleges 

Petitions: 358-HE-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-16 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 67; Against 7; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Replace copy from DCA with the fol- 
lowing: 

Be it resolved that all United 
Methodist institutions of higher 
education be encouraged to be sen- 
sitive to the following issues: 

1) Interpersonal communication and 
techniques. 



2) Cultural differences including lan- 
guages (Le. national and tribal). 

3) Be inclusive in regard to the 
politics, the economics, and the cultures 
of the world. 

4) Consider offering education events 
for pastors and laity in the areas of inter- 
personal communications, cultural dif- 
ferences, economics, and politicetl 
dynamics, and peacemaking, so that we 
may further witness to the world our 
seriousness about world peace and our 
wUlingness to be instruments of God's 
peace. 

( ) Concurrence { ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



250 FA58 

Subject: Conference Treasurers 

and Conference Benevolences 

Adjustment 

Petitions: 105-FA-715-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-73 
Membership 91; Present 80 
For 78; Against 2; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence with petition 105-FA-715-D as 
printed on page C-73 of the Advance 
DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



251 



HE42 

Subject: United Methodist Schools 
of Theology 

Petitions: 1052-HE-1531-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 67 
For 40; Against 25; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Recommends concurrence as 
amended: 

United Methodist schools of theol- 
ogy.. .such as its educational, missional, 
Btowardehip , and other service 
programs; practical experience in ad- 
ministration, stewardship and 
other such concerns of order;...shall 
provide in its curriculum the courses in 
United Methodist history, doctrine, a4- 
ministration and policy specified in Par. 
423.3 and 306.3a.. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



252 



HE54 

Subject: Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries 

Petitions: 842-HE-1511-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-112 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 74; Against 0; Not Voting 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



169 



Date: April 28, 1988 

Recommend concurrence with amend- 
ments: 

Petition Number 842-HE-1511-D; 
GBHM. 

Amend 1511.2.b): 

. . . ndoquatoly trained clergy to staff 
hoepitale health care settings, homes, 
correctional settings, industry, the 
armed forces, and counseling centers. 
The division will also interpret to 
its constituents the ongoing con- 
cerns of the denomination. 

and 1511.3: 

...and providing a continuing minis- 
try, that includes such activities as: 
retreats, confirmation classes, and other 
pastoral functions. Basic to all such 
ministry will be cooperation with and 
involvement in the life of the local 
United Methodist community and 
existing ecumenical and inter- 
religious programs. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



253 



HE44 

Subject: Black Colleges Related to 
UMC Black College Fund 

Petitions: 1074-HE-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-67 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Recommend concurrence. 

Editorial Change: 

Center column, 6th line from top: 
Amount should be $38,500,000 (38.5 
million) not $ 38 , 500 

Center column, 2nd paragraph: $38.5 
million not $ 3 8 million 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: No General, Conference, 
District, or Local Agency to Give 
Funds to Promote Homosexuality 

Petitions: 2421-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: 4-29-88 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence with petition 2421-FA-3000-R 
in favor of petition 137-FA-906-D. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



255 



Membership 83; Present 64 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Recommend concurrence as amended. 
835-HE-1505-D now reads: 
To provide ministerial courses of 
study for orderly entrance into ministry. 
which alco moot language noods . In 
providing these courses of study, 
consideration shall be given to lan- 
guages other than English. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



256* HE40 

Subject: United Methodist Schools 

of Theology 

Petitions: 856-HE-1531-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 70 
For 69; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28,1988 

Recommend nonconcurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



257 



HE47 
Subject: Objectives of GBHEM 

Petitions: 833-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-110 
Membership 83; Present 64 
For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Recommend concurrence with ad- 
men dment: 

To recruit, endorse, and provide 
general oversight of United Methodist 
ministers, including persons who speak 
languages other than in addition to 
English, who desire to serve as civilian 
and federal chaplains. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



258^ 



HE45 
Subject: Objectives of GBHEM 

Petitions: 835-HE-1505-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-111 



FA82 
Subject: Transmission of Funds 

Petitions: 2418-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 2418-FA-3000-R re- 
questing a 30-day transmission period 
for all funds designated to specific 
projects. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



259* FA81 

Subject: Upper Limits on 

Conference Budget 



Petitions: 2417-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 2417-FA-3000-R 
which presents formulas to set the 
upper limits on conference apportion- 
ments to the local church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Dat« / 



260^ 



FA80 
Subject: Editorial Correction for 

NAESC • 

Petitions: 1481-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
with petition 1481-FA-722-D to correct 
reference (Par . 710 . 1 . d) to (Par. 
TlO.l.e) at the end of Par. 722.6. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



261* FA79 
Subject: Annual Conference 
Approval of Fimds Approved by 
General Conference 

Petitions: 2039-FA-912-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 2039-FA-912-D 
which would require general church ap- 
portionments approved by General Con- 
ference to be subject to annual 
conference approval. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Establishing Limit to 
Apportionment Raise 

Petitions: 2010-FA-711-D, 2416-FA-3000- 
R, 2431-FA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with the following petitions: 

#2010 which would set an apportion- 
ment cap at 10% of most recent total of 
expenses for program, other operating 
expenses, and pastoral support. 

#2431 which woiUd set an apportion- 
ment cap at 10% of a church's total 



170 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



budget and giving the annual conference 
permission to request other offerings 

#2415 Which would set an apportion- 
ment cap at 25% of the total giving of 
the past year less the amount paid for 
building improvements. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



263* FA77 

Subject: Equitable Salaries 

Petitions: 963-FA-718-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence with petition 963-FA-718-D 
which would change ealaiy to support 
in several paragraphs of equitable 
salaries section. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



264 



HE29 

Subject: Support of Conscientious 
Objectors to Registration 

Petitions: 626-HE-3000-R 
Pages m Advance DCA: D-1-66 
Membership 83; Present 74 
For 73; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The following substitution is to 
replace the petition 626-HE-3000-R as 
printed in the Advance DCA. 

The United Methodist Church 
supports all persons who make 
decisions of conscience in regard 
to military service. The ministry 
of the church is not limited to 
those who conscientiously serve in 
the armed forces of their nation. It 
is also extended to those who, as a 
matter of conscience, refuse to 
serve in the armed forces, to 
cooperate with systems of military 
conscription, or to accept alternate 
service. (Social Principles V.G. 
XJMC and Peace V.2) 

In order to demonstrate this ministry, 
institutions of higher education af- 
filiated with the various entities of The 
United Methodist Church are expected 
to affirm that participation in systems of 
military conscription, including draft 
registration, will not be considered a pre- 
requisite to eligibility either for enroll- 
ment, or for institutionally controlled 
student aid funds. 

Therefore be it resolved that the 
General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church encourage all United 
Methodist institutions of higher educa- 



tion to respect those students who con- 
scientiously refuse to cooperate with the 
draft registration and provide them 
equal access to institutional financial aid 
resources to which they may be entitled. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



265* MN 

Subject: Par. 402.2 

Petitions: 64-MN-402-D, 1306-MN-402- 

D, 1967-MN-402-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-47 

Membership 98; Present 89 

For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 7 

Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



266* Lc 

Subject: Amend Par. 256 

Petitions: 1945-LC-256-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition is 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



267* LC 

Subject: Substsitute 
Administrative Board for Charge 
Conference 

Petitions: 1949-LC-259-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition i; 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



268* LC 

Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1950-LC-260-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 



The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



269' 



Subject: Delete Par. 252 

Petitions: 1941-LC-252-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



270* LC 

Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1946-LC-258-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Votmg 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



271 LC 

Subject: Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader / 

Petitions: 68-LC-251-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-34 
Membership 94; Present 86 
For 81; Against 3; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence. 

Par. 251.1 Insert a new sub-paragraph 
a) and renumber the remaining sub- 
paragraphs. 

a) Fostering awareness of the 
role of laity both within the con- 
gregation and through their mini- 
stries in the home, work place, 
community, and world and tinding 
ways within the community of 
faith to recognize all these mini- 
stries. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



171 



272' 



LC 



Subject: Responsibilities of Lay 
Leader 

Petitions: 682-LC-251-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-35 
Membership 94; Present 84 
For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence. 

Par. 251.1. Add a new sub-paragraph 
f) 

f) Membership on the committee 
on Nominations and Personnel and 
Committee on Finance (See Par. 
267.1, 267.3). 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



273^ 



LC 



Subject: Charge Conference 

Petitions: 572-LC-247-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-33 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. Amend Par. 247.3 as follows: 
Beginning with line 3, mission and min- 
istry of the church (Par. 201-204), 
receive reports, and adopt objectives... 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



274* LC 

Subject: Delete Par. 253 

Petitions: 1942-LC-253-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition is 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one chiu-ch. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



275* 



LC 



Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1938-LC-249-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition is 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



276* LC 

Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1940-LC-251-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition is 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



277' 



LC 



Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1948-LC-258-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. The purpose of this petition is 
to provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



278^ 



LC 



Subject: Piupose for Uniting Local 
Churches 

Petitions: 2074-LC-2543-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Present 79 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence in favor of 605-LC- 
2543-D. 

We therefore petition the General 
(Conference to amend Par. 2543 to read 
as follows: 

2543. Two or more local churches, in 
order to more effectively fulfill 
their ministry (Par. 201-204), may 
merge and become a single church... 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



279* FA62 

Subject: Annual Conference's Right 

to Set Policy on Number of Years a 

Pastor Is Eligible for Equitable 

Salaries 

Petitions: 112-FA-722-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-75 

Membership 91 Present 82 

For 81; Against 0; Not Voting 1 

Date: April 29, 1988 



Committee recommends concurrence 
with petition 112-FA-722-D as printed 
' - C-75 of the Advance DCA. 



onp 

( ) Concurrence 



( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



280 FA63 

Subject: Clergy Couples 

Petitions: 2250-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 81; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 2250-FA-722-D 
which would create a new paragraph 
722.4 Clergy couples. Unlike the 
provisions of Par. 659.6, it is not 
the intent that either or both pas- 
tors waive their claim on mini- 
mum salaries. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



281 FA64 (Financial Ad- 
ministration) 

Subject: Chairs of Board of 
Pension Ex Officio on CCFA 

Petitions: 1427-FA-708-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 1427-FA-708-D re- 
questing ex officio, without vote, seating 
of chair or representative of board of 
pensions on the CCFA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



282 



FA65 

Subject: Conference Secretary Ex 
Officio on CCFA Without Vote 

Petitions: 526-FA-708-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 526-FA-708-D which 
requested ex officio status without vote 
for the conference secretary on the 
CCFA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



283* FA66 
Subject: Optional CCFA 

Petitions: 1773-FA-707-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 



172 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprH 30, 1988 



Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
cmrence with petition 1773-FA-707-D 
which would permit an optional con- 
ference coimcil on finance and ad- 
ministration in annual conferences. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



284* FA67 

Subject: Apportionment Formulas 

Petitions: 2173-FA-711-D, 2422-FA-3000- 

R 

Pages in Advance DCA: 

Membership 91; Present 82 

For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 29, 1988 

The committee voted nonconcurrence 
with the following petitions 2173-FA- 
711-D asking for apportionment formula 
based on membership given in late sum- 
mer or early fall. 2422-FA-3000-R asking 
for apportionment formula based on the 
income of a church, not its expenditures. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



285' 



FA68 

Subject: Racial/Ethnic Minority 
Representation on Equitable 
Salaries Commission 

Petitions: 403-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-74 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence with petition 403-FA-722-D as 
printed on page C-74 of the Advance 
DCA with the insertion of the phrase "in- 
sofar as possible" between "shall insure" 
and "adequate representation" in the last 
sentence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



286* Lc 

Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1937-LC-248-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence 

The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



287 LC 

Subject: Terms of Trustee 

Petitions: 2069-LC-2529-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 75 
For 71; Agamst 3; Not Voting 1 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

Proposed Paragraph 2529, Section 1 
1. Within thirty days after the begin- 
ning of the ensuing calendar or con- 
ference year (whichever applies to 
the term of office) each Board of Trus- 
tee shall convene at a time and place 
designated by the chairperson, or by the 
vice-chairperson in the event that the 
chairperson is not reelected a trustee or 
because of absence or disabUity is unable 
to act, for the purpose of electing of- 
ficers of the said board for the ensuing 
year and transacting any other business 
properly brought before it. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



290 



LC 



288 



LC 



Subject: Eliminate Charge 
Conference in Churches of Only 
One Charge 

Petitions: 1935-LC-247-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



289 



LC 



Subject: Substitute Administrative 
Board for Charge Conference 

Petitions: 1939-LC-250-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Present 88 
For 88; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

The purpose of this petition is to 
provide for the elimination of the 
Charge Conference in charges of only 
one church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Subject: Notification of 
Apportionments 

Petitions: 38-LC-247-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-33 
Membership 94 Present 85 
For 69; Against 16; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconoir- 
rence. 

This notification shaU include a com- 
plete breakdown of the World Service, 
Conference Benevolences and any other 
apportionments, specifying the amounts 
apportioned for each Board and Agency 
of the Church and for each Fund and 
each Benevolence being apportioned 

Para. 247.14 as amended would then 
read as follows: 

As soon as practicable after the ses- 
sion of Annual Conference, each district 
superintendent or designate agent shall 
notify each local church in the district 
what amounts have been apportioned to 
it for World Service and Conference 
Benevolences. This notification 
shall include a complete break- 
down of the World Service Con- 
ference Benevolences and any 
other apportionments, specifying 
the amounts apportioned for each 
Board and Agency of the Church 
and for each Fund and each 
Benevolence being apportioned. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



291 LC 

Subject: Include Veteran Holidays 
on Calendars Printed by 

The UM Publishing House 
Petitions: 349-LC-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Present 87 
For 87; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

All calendars printed by The 
United Methodist Publishing 
House include the following 
veteran holidays: Loyalty Day, May 
1, Armed Forces Day, 3rd Saturday 
in May; Memorial Day, 4th Monday 
in May; Flag Day, June 14; Indepen- 
dence Day, July 4; Veterans Day, 
November 11. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



173 



292 



LC 



Subject: Definition of Lay Leader 

Petitions: 1438-LC-251D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94 Present 86 
For 86; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Ck)nimittee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

251.1 The lay leader is the person 
elected by the Charge Conference, and 
no person shall be eligible for elec- 
tion who is not a layperson as 
defined in 801.3c). The lay leader 
shall have the following responsibilities: 
251.2 The lay member(s) of the Annual 
Conference and one or more alternates 
shall be elected annually or quadrennial- 
ly as the Annual Conference directs, 
and no person shall be eligible for 
election who is not a layperson as 
defined in 801.3c). 

( ) Concurrence { ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



293 



LC 



Subject: Church Lay Leader 
Member of Annual Conference 

Petitions: 442-LC-251-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 94; Present 86 
For 84; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
DateiApril 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

Amend the Book of Discipline of The 
United Methodist Church by adding to 
Par. 251.1 a (Church Lay Leaders) the 
following: 

"In order to assist and facilitate 
in the interpretation of these ac- 
tions and programs it is recom- 
mended that the Church Lay 
Leader also be the Lay Member to 
Annual Conference;" 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



294' 



LC 



Subject: Deeding Church Property 
to a Federated Church 

Petitions: 607-LC-2545-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-125 
Membership 94; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

Amend par. 2545.1 beginning with 
line 1 as follows: 

When a local church no longer 
serves the purpose for which it was 
organized and incorporated (Par. 



201-204), with the consent of presiding 
bishop.... 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



295 



LC 



Subject: Merging Local Churches 

Petitions: 605-LC-2543-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-125 
Membership 94; Present 78 
For 68; Against 10; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence. 

Amend par. 2543 beginning at line 1 
as follows: 

Two or more local churches, in order 
to more effectively fulfill their min- 
istry (Par. 201-204), may merge and 
become.... 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



296* FM9 

Subject: Use of Inclusive Language 
in the Church 

Petitions: 1328-FM-3000-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 83 

For 83; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

"Holy Scripture makes frequent 
reference to Clod as He, Him and 
Father. Jesus, Himself spoke of His 
Father in Heaven. At no time does Scrip- 
ture refer to God as she, her or mother 
god. Therefore, the use of "inclusive lan- 
guage" in prayers, music, liturgy, ser- 
mons, teachings and printed materials is 
incompatible with Scripture." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



297 



C012 

Subject: Persons Seated at Annual 
Conference Without Vote 

Petitions: 543-CO-701-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-69 
Membership 83; Present 68 
For 62; Against 5; Not Voting 1 
Date: 4-28-88 

The committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



298 HE39 

Subject: Schools of Theology 

Petitions: 423-HE-1500-D 
Pages m Advance DCA: C-114 
Membership 83; Present 70 



For 65; Against 5; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Recommend referral to GBHEM 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



299 HE36 

Subject: Foundational Courses 

Petitions: 1357-HE-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed 
Membership 83; Present 70 
For 67; Against 2; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Recommend concurrence as amended; 
resolution to read: BE IT RESOLVED 
that the United Methodist seminaries be 
encouraged to develop an accessible 
geographically dispersed method for the 
delivery of the foundational courses, in a 
manner responsive to the needs of per- 
sons presently engaged in diaconal min- 
istry, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that 
the Board of Higher Education and Mini- 
stry consider making make funds 
available to the United Methodist semi- 
naries to assist in the development of 
such methods of delivery of required 
foundational ( 



) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



300 



IJ23 

Subject: Establishment of 
Commission on Persons with 
Handicapping Conditions 

Petitions: 376-IJ-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-17 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 52; Against 0; Not Voting 2 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



301 



FA69 

Subject: Reporting of Salary 
Support 

Petitions: 2012-FA-724-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 81; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 2012-FA-724-D 
which would require reporting of equi- 
table salary, mission support, eta in the 
annual conference journal in a colunm 
adjacent to pastor's salaiy. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



174 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



302 



FA70 

Subject: Deletion of Extra Material 
from National Association of 
Commissions on Equitable Salaries 

Petitions: 1484-FA-907-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 81; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Ck)mmittee recommends conairrence 
with petition 1484-FA-907-D which 
deletes the last two sentences of 
paragraph 907. 13. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



303* FA71 

Subject: Mandatory Reporting of 
Professional Expense (Travel, Etc.) 
Petitions: 506-FA-724-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 506-FA-724-D re- 
questing that (1) professional expenses 
be reimbursed only by voucher, (2) 
amoimts for professional expense not be 
included in salary considerations, and 
(3) housing expenses be separated from 
salary totals and be paid by local church. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



304^ 



FA72 

Subject: World Service and 
Conference Benevolences Added 
Together If Voted by Annual 
Conference 
Petitions: 1640-FA-710-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91 Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 1640-FA-710-D 
which proposes an annual conference op- 
tion of putting World Service and Con- 
ference Benevolences together, or as 
sin^e budget item. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



305* FA73 

Subject: Optional Committee on 

Equitable Salaries 

Petitions: 1175-FA-722-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 



Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 1775-FA-722-D to 
change ekeH to may in Par. 722 and 
others to make an equitable salaries 
commission optional in an annual con- 
ference. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



306* FA74 
Subject: District CFA 

Petitions: 260-FA-700-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 91; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence with petition 260-FA-700-D which 
would create a new Par. 748 permitting 
districts to establish district CFAs for ac- 
countability. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

307* FA57 

Subject: Episcopal Residence 

Committee 

Petitions: 1140-FA-735-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-83 
Membership 91; Present 80 
For 80; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
with Petition 1140-FA-735-D as printed 
on p. C-83 of the Advance DCA with the 
errata printed on p. 24 of the DCA. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



308* MN 

Subject: Appointment of District 
Superintendent 

Petitions: 1862-MN-517-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 82 
For 82; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Re: Par. 517, add an elder shall not 
be appointed as district superinten- 
dent over the district in which 
he/she has most recently served. 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



309* MN 

Subject: Supervision of Mission 
Site 

Petitions: 479-MN-519-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 98; Present 87 



For 87; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

An addition to Par. 519: 

and where a mission site has be- 
come established by the National 
Division at a church(es) the 
pastor's additional responsibility 
be discussed and supervised. 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence in favor of present Discipline. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

310* uii 

Subject: Request for Declaratoiy 
Decision re: Par. 2625.3 

Petitions: 1826 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 62; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence with the following 
amendment: 

The General Conference hereby peti- 
tions the Judicial Council for a declara- 
tory decision as to the meaning of Par. 
2625.3 of the 1984 Discipline including 
all the concerns and questions expressed 
in petition 1826 and requests a decision 
at this General Conference in sufTicient 
time for remedial legislation if necessary. 

PETITION TO 

THE 1988 GENERAL CON- 
FERENCE OF THE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

PETITION TO THE JUDICIAL 
COUNCIL FOR A DECLARATORY 
DECISION AS TO THE HEARING, AP- 
PLICATION, OR EFFECT OF SEC- 
TION 2625.3 OF THE 1984 
DISCIPLINE 

There are tmcertainties with respect 
to this sub = paragraph that should be 

clarified. 

1) Is it correctly printed in the present 
Discipline? It contains a drastic change 
from the 1980 printing which the Daily 
Christian Advocate of the 1984 General 
Conference does not show to have been 
adopted. The sub-section relates to Juris- 
dictional and Central Conference Courts 
of Appeals (which, under the (institu- 
tion Par. 25.6 and 29.7, probably should 
be called committees on appeals). The 
last sentence as printed, with the chan- 
ges from the 1980 Discipline underlined, 
reads as follows: 

"The court (sic) shall elect its own 
president and secretary and adopt its 
own rules of procedures, and its 
decisions shall be final, except that an 
appeal may be taken to the Judicial 
Coimcil only upon questions of law re- 
lated to procedures of the Judicial Court 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



175 



(sic) of Appeals, or under the provisions 
of Par. 2614". 

Such changes, if validly adopted, ap- 
pear drastically to limit, and for practi- 
cal purposes virtually eliminate, the 
authority of the Judicial Council to 
review trials of ministerial members 
within the jurisdictions, though, by tech- 
nical construction, not relating to trials 
of local pastors, diaconal ministers, or 
ministerial members of annual or 
provisional annual conferences of 
central conferences, who impliedly are 
left without any appeal right. 

The Judicial Council should first be 
asked to determine whether the amend- 
ment actually was adopted. The 1984 Ad- 
vance Daily Christian Advocate at pp. 
F- 148- 149 shows such an amendment 
was proposed by the Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry. Report No. 206 
of the Committee on Administrative 
Order and Independent Commissions, 
Calendar No. 1312 at pp. 649-650 ap- 
pears to deal with the proposal (though 
it refers only to petitions AD- 1525 and 
1548 and not to the Advance DCA). It 
covers many other proposals of F-148- 
149, but with respect to Par. 2625 refers 
only to Par. 2625.1(g) and renumbering 
the following three sub-paragraphs. 
There is no mention of any change in 
Par. 2625.3. 

The report of the debate on Calendar 
No. 1312 at pp. 796-798 of the Daily 
Christian Advocate contains no 
reference to paragraph 2625.3. Does not 
the General (Conference act only upon 
matters brought before it through calen- 
dar items? 

2) The Judicial Coimcil should be 
asked to determine whether the trial of 
a local pastor or diaconal minister may 
be appealed to a Jurisdictional or 
(Central Conference committee on, or 
(Dourt of, Appeals. The heading of the 
sub = paragraph, "Appeal of a Ministerial 
Member of an Annual Conference, Local 
Pastor or Diaconal Minister", suggests 
an afTirmative answer to the question, 
but are headings in the Discipline only 
editorial additions by the publishing 
house rather than legislation adopted by 
the General Conference? The sub- 
sequent provision for including local pas- 
tors or diaconal ministers as members of 
such committees or courts, and referen- 
ces to local pastors and diaconal mini- 
sters as appellants, would also seem to 
indicate an affirmative answer, yet the 
grant of authority is limited to "power to 
hear and determine appeals of mini- 
sterial members taken from any annual 
conference wthin the jurisdiction." 



3) The Judicial Council should be 
asked to determine whether a trial of a 
ministerial member of a missionary con- 
ference or of an annual conference or 
provisional annual conference of a 
Central conference committee on, or 
Court of. Appeals. The heading of the 
sub = paragraph as presently printed 
refers to a ministerial member of an an- 
nual conference which would seem to 
suggest that annual conferences of both 
jurisdictions and central conferences are 
intended to be included, but when 
authority is granted to the committee or 
court the reference is only to an annual 
conference within a jurisdiction, which 
might be construed to execute annual 
conferences or provisional annual con- 
ferences of the central conferences, and 
there is no mention of ministerial mem- 
bers of the missionary conferences. 

4) The petition can ask the Judicial 
Council to determine whether counsel 
or the church has the right to appeal or 
cross-appeal, either to the Jurisdictional 
or Central Conference Committee on, or 
Court of, Appeals or to the Judicial 
Council. The subparagraph speaks only 
of appeals of ministerial members, 
though on occasion cross-appeals have 
been taken by counsel for the church. A 
related question is the effect or extent of 
an appeal by counsel for the church. In 
many jurisdictions the state or crown 
may appeal from an acquittal. The ap- 
peal, however, can result only in 
clarification of a point of law and serve 
as a precedent for subsequent trials. 
Under the principle of double jeopardy 
one who has been acquitted may not be 
tried again for the same offense, even 
though an appellate court decides the ac- 
quittal resulted from serious error in the 
trial court. 

5) The Judicial Council should be peti- 
tioned to determine whether this sub- 
paragraph, with or without the 
questionable 1984 amendment, limits 
the jurisdiction of the Judicial Council 
in connection with such appeals strictly 
to questions of law, despite the general 
provision of Par. 2625. Kg) giving appel- 
late courts (which would seem intended 
to include the Judicial Council), 
authority to determine whether the 
weight of the evidence sustains the 
charge or charges. In at least some juris- 
dictions, questions as to the weight of 
the evidence, or even the manifest 
weight of the evidence, are considered 
questions of fact or perhaps mixed ques- 
tions of fact and law, but not strictly 
questions of law. 



Other petitions will propose amend- 
ments to Par. 2625.3 relating to these 
questions, but if a declaratory decision is 
sought and obtained from the Judicial 
Council reasonably early in the 1988 
General Conference, it will be much 
easier to decide which changes need, or 
at least ought, to be made. Such a 
decision probably would also be very 
helpful to the legislative commmittee in 
determining the language of any amend- 
ments the committee decides to recom- 
mend. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Leonard D. Slutz, member of the 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, West Ohio Annual (Con- 
ference 



) Concurrence ( ) Ni 



Dat« / 



311 



IJ20 

Subject: $250,000 for Native 
American History from Archives 
and History 

Petitions: 2553-IJ-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concur; with amendment: 
to delete funding and refer to Ar- 
chives and History. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



312' 



IJ36 

Subject: Composition of Annual 
Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race 

Petitions: 408-U-739-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: C-83 

Membership 72; Present 62 

For 61; Against 0; Not Voting 1 

Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Concurrence with the following 

amendment: 
Delete: poreone ovor 66 
Add in its place: older adults 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



313' 



U35 

Subject: General Commission on 
Communication 

Petitions: 895-IJ-1905-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 54; 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



176 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



314' 



U34 

Subject: Additions to Historic 
Slirines and Landmarks 

Petitions: 865-IJ-1812-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Concurrence 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



315 



IJ32 

Subject: Historic Shrines, Historic 
Landmarks, and Historic 
Sites-Remove Term "National" 

Petitions: 863-IJ-1812-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 63 
For 57; Against 6; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



316 



IJ33 

Subject: Responsibilities 
Connected With Historic Shrines, 
Historic Landmarks, and Historic 
Sites 

Petitions: 864-IJ-1812-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 53; Against 1; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



317^ 



U31 

Subject: Officers of Historical 
Society 

Petitions: 862-IJ-1810-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



318' 



IJ30 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Archives and History and its 
Work 

Petitions: 799-IJ-737-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-83 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Committee recommends concurrence. 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



319* IJ29 

Subject: Permanent Easter Sunday 

Petitions: 434-U-3000-M 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



320* IJ28 

Subject: Establish a Permanent 
Christmas Sunday 

Petitions: 433-IJ-3000-M 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcior- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



321= 



IJ27 
Subject: U.M. Television Ministry 

Petitions: 378-IJ-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-18 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Concurrence with referral to General 
Commission on Commimication. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



322 



IJ26 

Subject: Establish Commission on 
Alcohol and Drug Concerns 

Petitions: 377-IJ-3000-R$ 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-18 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



323* IJ25 

Subject: Membership of the 
General Commission on Archives 
and History 

Petitions: 861-IJ-1804-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-117 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 

324* 024 

Subject: Remove Secretary of 
General Conference from Archives 
and History 

Petitions: 359-U-1804-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence, cared for by petition 
861. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



325* IJ22 

Subject: 500th Anniversary of 
Christopher Columbus 

Petitions: 660-IJ-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-14 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



326* IJ21 

Subject: Creation of a Cominission 
on Drugs and Alcohol 

Petitions: 2551-U-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 54; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence and refer to General Board of 
Church and Society with a deep concern 
that this matter receive high priority. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



327* IJ37 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Religion and Race 

Petitions: 127-IJ-739-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-83 
Membership 72; Present 63 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



328 IJ41 

Subject: District Directors of 
Religion and Race; District 
Committees 

Petitions: 409-IJ-700-D 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



177 



Pages in Advance DCA: C-85 
Membership 72; Present 62 
For 55; Against 6; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
as amended: 

Change me^ to shall; delete AlsO) as 
appropriate 



( ) Concurrence ( ) Ni 



Date / 



329* IJ38 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Religion and Race 

Petitions: 128-IJ-739-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-84 
Membership 72; Present 63 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



330^ 



IJ19 

Subject: UMCom to Develop a 
Communications Plan to Honor 
Oral Tradition of Native Americans 

Petitions: 2060-IJ-1906-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 72; Present 54 
For 53; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
with referral to General Commission on 
Communication. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



331' 



IJ40 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Religion and Race 

Petitions: 171-IJ-739-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-84 
Membership 72; Present 63 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



332' 



IJ39 

Subject: Membership of 
Conference Commission on 
Religion and Race 

Petitions: 1113-IJ-739-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-84 
Membership 72; Present 63 
For 63; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



333* IJ42 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Religion and Race 

Petitions: 130-IJ-739-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-84 
Membership 72; Present 64 
For 64; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



334 



FMIO 

Subject: Study on How to Involve 
Entire Church in Communicating 
Christian Beliefs 

Petitions: 1490-FM-3000-S$ 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed in 

Advance DCA 

Membership 90; Present 77 

For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

Nonconcurrence 

I, Donald R. Rodgers, a member of 
North Bethesda UMC in Bethesda, 
Maryland, do, hereby petition the 1988 
General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church to initiate a study 
which will determine and implement 
what is deemed to be the most practical 
process for involving the entire church 
in an ongoing effort to articulate peri- 
odically as clearly as possible and com- 
municate as widely as possible who we 
are as Christians, what our expectations 
of the future are, and how we intend to 
realize those expectations. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



335^ 



FMll 

Subject: Biblical Faith and 
Practices in the Wesleyan Spirit 

Petitions: 1691-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Nonconcurrence 

I charge the General Conference to 
adopt resolutions clearly stating the fol- 
lowing convictions which I believe to be 
in harmony with biblical faith and prac- 
tice in the Wesleyan spirit: 

1. A dear affirmation of the primacy 
of Scripture in the 1988 Book of Dis- 
cipline of The United Methodist Church. 

2. The preservation of the traditional 
language of historic Christianity that 
refers to the Trinity as "Father, Son and 
Holy Spirit." 



3. The cm-rent prohibition of the or- 
dination of practicing homosexuals in 
the United Methodist Church. In sum- 
mary, I fully affirm the statement regard- 
ing these issues known as "The Houston 
Declaration." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



ODD FM13 
Subject: Against Houston 
Declaration 

Petitions: 1817-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"I am against the Houston Declaration 
and its narrow view of the following: 

The ordination of homosexuals, which 
can be seen as nothing less than class 
discrimination, 

"The mandating of the traditional use 
of the Trinitarian name during ordina- 
tion, 

"The primacy of Scripture at the loss 
of our quadrUateral emphasis." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



337^ 



FM14 

Subject: Include Conclusions of 
Houston Declaration 

Petitions: 1829-FM-69-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: AprU 27, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

Include in The Book of Discipline of 
The United Methodist Church in 69. Sec- 
tion 3, Our Theological Task, the con- 
clusions of the Houston Declaration of 
December 15, 1987, that reaffirms: 

1. The PRIMACY OF SCRIPTURE, 

2. The traditional language that refers 
to the TRINITY as "FATHER, SON and 
HOLY SPIRIT," and 

3. The United Methodist Church's 
ban against ordination of practicing 
homosexuals. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



OOO FM15 

Subject: Retain Portions of Par. 69 



Petitions: 3-FM-69-D 



178 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed in 
DCA; see text below 
Membership 90; Present 85 
For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"Be it resolved that the 1988 General 
Conference of The United Methodist 
Church retain, without alteration or sub- 
stitution, the paragraphs under the head- 
ings. Doctrinal Guidelines in The United 
Methodist Church, Scripture, Tradition, 
Experience, Reason, and These 
Guidelines in Interaction, on pp. 78-81, 
Par. 69, 'Our Theological Task', found in 
The Book of Discipline, 1984." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



339 FM16 

Subject: Substitute for Ecumenical 

Commitment Section of CTTK 

Report 

Petitions: 1341-FM-69-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not printed in 

DCA; see text below 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
currence. 

"Christian unity is founded on the 
theological xmderstanding that in our 
baptism, we are made members-in-com- 
mon of the one Body of Christ. Visible 
Christian unity, therefore, is not an op- 
tion or a "search"; it is a gift to be 
received and expressed. 

"As United Methodists, we are firmly 
committed to Christian unity at local, 
national, and world levels. The United 
Methodist Church actively supports the 
ways by which mutual recognition of 
churches, of members, and of ministries 
may lead us into sharing in Holy Com- 
munion with all of God's people. Our 
local congregations have a rich ex- 
perience of common projects and 
programs. Many state councils of chur- 
ches value United Methodists for taking 
m^or leadership roles and assuming 
fmancial responsibility. The United 
Methodist Church is an influential mem- 
ber of the World Council of Churches, 
the National Coimcil of the Churches of 
Christ in the U.S.A., the Consultation 
on Church Union, and the World 
Methodist Council. Bilateral dialogues 
with other communions at both the na- 
tional and international level challenge 
participants to probe our own traditions 
and to engage with those of others. 
Ecumenical convergences and consensus 



statements are leading to the healing of 
age-old divisions and to the renewal of 
the church in unity and mission. We see 
the Holy Spirit at work in all the ways 
that unity among us in theology and ac- 
tion is becoming more visible. 

"Principles of Christian unity also 
apply to relationships between Chris- 
tians tmd those persons of other living 
faiths. In our interreligious relationships 
we seek to be loving neighbors as we ex- 
press our own witness. Such encounters 
require us to reflect anew on our faith 
and seek prayerful guidance for oxir en- 
counter with our neighbors of other 
faiths. We then rediscover that the God 
who acted in Jesus Christ for the salva- 
tion of the whole world is also the 
Creator of all humankind, the One who 
is "above all and though all and in all." 
(Ephesians 4:6) Indeed, we are people 
boimd together on one planet and see 
the need for a self-critical view of the 
Christian tradition and accurate ap- 
preciation of other living faiths. In these 
encoimters, our aim is not some lowest 
common denominator of religious agree- 
ment, but the development of relation- 
ships of respect and mutuality between 
people. 

"We labor together with the help of 
God toward the salvation, health, and 
peace of the global family. In conversa- 
tions and cooperation, we confess our 
Christian faith wherever we are and 
strive to display the manner in which 
Jesus Christ is the life and hope of the 
world.' 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Jesus Christ, the covenant community, 
and God's world." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



340 



FM17 
Subject: Our Theological Task 

Petitions: 2096-FM-69-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

Keep "Our Theological Task" state- 
ment in its present form (thereby reject- 
ing the Report from the Commission on 
Our Theological Task. 

Add one sentence to the end of the 
first paragraph in the "Conclusion" 
(present p. 85), following the sentence 
"...mark out the broad boundaries of our 
endeavor." 

"This is the essential -'method' of 
United Methodism~a careful, joyous, 
deliberate, and identified process in 
responding to God's self disclosure in- 



341 



FM18 
Subject: Retain Paragraph 67 

Petitions: 2093-FM-67-D 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 29, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

We petition that the present doctrinal 
statement in the Discipline (paragraphs 
67-69) be retained and not replaced by 
the recommendationof the Committee 
on Our Theological Task. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



342* FM12 

Subject: Prinicpal Factors of our 

Faith 

Petitions: 1491-FM-3000-R 

Pages in Advance DCA: Not Printed in 

DCA 

Membership 90; Present 85 

For 85; Against 0; Not Voting 

Date: April 27, 1988 

Nonconcurrence. 

Be it resolved that the Administrative 
Board of First United Methodist 
Church, Lafayette, Louisana go on 
record as favoring the primacy of Scrip- 
ture; traditional use of Father, Son and 
Holy Spirit, and an absolute ban on ac- 
cepting applications of candidates for 
ministry and ordination of any avowed 
practicing homosexual. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



343 



GA28 
Subject: Ongoing Priority 

Petitions: 134-GA-803-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-86 
Membership 82; Present 73 
For 47; Against 24; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



344 GA27 

Subject: General Agency 

Membership 

Petitions: 135-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-87 
Membership 82; Present 79 
For 51; Against 27; Not Voting 1 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



179 



Date: AprU 27, 1988 

Concurrence 

Rationale: This legislation insures 
that aU additional members to the 
general agencies would have the endorse- 
ment of their respective annual con- 
ferences. It maintains the linkage and 
accountability between general agencies 
and the annual conferences. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



344 



GA27 (Minority Report) 
Subject: General Agency 
Membership 

Petitions: 135-GA-805-D 
Pages in Advance DCA: C-87 
Memership 82; Present 79 
For 51; Against 27; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 29, 1988 

Takayuki Ishii; Pataricia Hammer, 
Presenter 
Minority Report for Paragraph 805.3b 
Add at the end of paragraph 805.3b: 
Episcopal and additional members, if 
any of the general agencies listed in 
805.3a shall be nominated and elected 
by the procedures specified inthe 
paragraphs listed in 805.3a. The agen- 
cies shall consider, but not bo limited to , 
name forward to them by the jurisdic- 
tions as having been nominated by the 
Annual and Missionary Conferences in 
the United States and Puerto Rico but 
not elected by the Jurisdictional Con- 
ferences to general agency membership. 
Additional names may be con- 
sidered in order to perfect the rep- 
resentation as provided in 805.2d, 
including these categories: 

a) persons with special knowledge or 
background which will aid in the work 
of the agency; 

b) race/ethnicity; 

c) age (youth, young adult, older 
adult); 

d) persons with handicapping condi- 
tions; 

e) geographical diversity; 

f) gender; 

g) theological diversity; 

h) small membership churches. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



345 Dii 

Subject: Hymnal Revision 
Committee Report including 
Corrigenda 

Petitions: 529-DI-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 1-1210 
Membership 116; Present 99 
For 99; Against 0; Not Voting 



Committee recommends concurrence 
with the following amendments: 

Subject: Hymns 

Amendment 1 

Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 133-913 

Add "I Danced in the Morning" 
("Lord of the Dance") 

Subject: Psalter 

Amendment 2 

Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 914-1061 

Move to approve the section of Peti- 
tion 529 designated United Methodist 
Liturgical Psalter (pp. 914-10621) with 
one qualification: that the third person 
mascidine singular possessive pronoun 
in reference to God be restored in these 
Psalm verses: 

Ps. 3:4, 1 ay aloud to the Lord who 
answers me from his holy hill. 

Ps. 20:6, Now I know that the Lord 
will help his anointed, and will answer 
him from his holy heaven. With mighty 
victories by the Lord's right hand. 

Ps. 22:31, And proclaim his 
deliverance to a people yet unborn that 
the Lord has wrought it. 

Ps. 27:5, The Lord will hide me in his 
shelter in the day of trouble, will conceal 
me under the cover of his tent, and will 
set me high upon a rock. 

Ps. 28:8, the saving refuge of his 
anointed. 

Ps. 29:2, Ascribe to the Lord the glory 
of his name; 

Ps. 29:9, The voice of the Lord makes 
the oaks to whirl, and strips the forests 
bare; and in his temple all cry, "Glory!" 

29:11, May the Lord give strength to 
his people! May the Lord bless his 
people with peace! 

Ps. 30:4, Sing praises to the Lord, O 
you his saints, and give thanks to his 
holy name. 

Ps. 34:9, O fear the Lord, you his holy 
ones, for those who fear (jod have no 
want! 

34:22, The Lord redeems the life of 
his servants; none of those who take 
refuge in (iod will be condemned. 

Ps. 35:27, "Great is the Lord, who 
delights in the welfare of his servants." 



Ps. 42:8, ~"By day the Lord com- 
mands his steadfast love; and at night 
God's song is with me, a prayer to the 
(iodofmylife. 

Ps. 47:8, God reigns over the nations; 
God sits on his holy throne. 

Ps. 57:3c, God will send forth his 
steadfast love and faithfulness. 

Ps. 66:20, Blessed by God, who has 
not rejected my prayer or removed his 
steadfast love from me. 

Ps. 78:32, They did not believe in his 
wonders, 

Ps. 85:8, Let me hear what God will 
speak, for the Lord will speak peace to 
his people, to his saints, to those who 
turn to the Lord in their hearts. 

Ps. 91:4, and will cover you with his 
pinions; 

91:11, For God will give his angels 
charge over you. 

Ps. 94:14, For the Lord will not for- 
sake his people; and will not abandon 
his heritage. 

Ps. 96: 13, The Lord will judge the 
world with righteousness, and the 
peoples with his truth. 

Ps. 97:3, Fire goes before the Lord, 
and burns up his adversaries round 
about. 

97:10, The Lord loves those who hate 
evil, preserves the lives of his saints. 

Ps. 98:2, The Lord has declared vic- 
tory, and has revealed his vindication in 
the sight of the nations. 

98:3, The Lord has remembered his 
steadfast love and faithfulness. 

Ps. 99:9, Extol the Lord our God, and 
worship at his holy mountain. 

PS. 102:16, For the Lord will build up 
Zion, and will appear in his glory. 

102:19, That the Lord looked down 
from his holy height. 

Ps. 103:18, to those who keep his 
covenant and remember to do his com- 
mandments. 

Ps. 104:3 1, May the glory of the Lord 
endure forever, may the Lord rejoice in 
his works. 

Ps. 105:4, Seek the Lord and his 
strength, 

105:8, The Lord is mindful of his 
everlasting covenant, 

105:9, the covenant made with 
Abraham, his promise sworn to Isaac, 

Ps. 106.8, God saved them for the 
sake of his holy name, 

106:23, Therefore the Lord intended 
to destroy them had not Moses, his 
chosen one, 

Ps. 107:8, Let them thank the Lord 
for his steadfast love, for his wonderful 
works to humankind. 



180 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Ps. 111:4, who has caused his wonder- 
ful works to be remembered, 

111:5, The Lord provides food for 
those who are faithful and is ever mind- 
ful of hi8 covenant. 

111:6, The Lord has shown his people 
the power of his works, 

111:9, The Lord sends his people the 
power of his works, 

Ps. 116.2, and has inclined his ear to 
me whenever I called. 

116:14, 1 will pay my vows to the Lord 
in the presence of all his people. 

116:15, Precious in the sight of the 
Lord is the death of his people. 

Ps. 125:2, so the Lord is round about 
his people. 

Ps. 135:14, For the Lord will vindicate 
his people, and have compassion on his 
servants. 

Ps. 145:9, The Lord is good to all, his 
compassion is over all his creation. 

Ps. 148:2, Praise the Lord, all his an- 
gels, praise the Lord all his hosts! 

148:14, God has raised up a horn for 
his people, praise for all his saints. 

Ps. 150:1, Praise God in his 
sanctuary; praise God in his mighty fir- 
mament. 

150:2, Praise God for his mighty 
deeds; praise God for his exceeding 



Subject: Word and Table 

Amendment 3 

Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 77-107 

p. 84 and p.88 CONFESSION AND 
PARDON 

Delete: Merciful God, we confess that 
often wo have failed to bo an obodiont 



and substitute: Merciful God, we con- 
fess that we have not loved you with 
our whole heart. We have failed to 
be an obedient church. 

Amendment 4 

p. 101 Confession should be amended 
as follows: 
line 2, maker of aU things, judge of all 

delete men and substitute people. 

Subject: Baptism 

Amendment 5 



t Danced in the 

Morning (Lord of the Dance) 

In a strung two 



danced in the morn-ing when the world was be ■ gun, ; 

danced for the scribe and the phar - i ■ see, t 

danced on the Sab bath when I cured the lame, 

danced on a Fri ■ day and the sky turned black 

cut me down and I leapt up high. 



danced 
they 



noon 

would not dance 

ly peo 

to dance 



and the stars 

and they would n 
pie said 

with the dev - 
that - 'II nev • ( 



was a shame, 
on your back, 



They 
They 




whipped and they stripped and they hung 
bur ■ ied my bod • y and they thought 
live in you if you'll live 




lead you all wherever you may be, and I'll lead you all in the Dance, said he. 



WORDS; Sydney an. 



MUSIC: Adapt, fiom 19lh cent. Shaker sources by Sydney Carter. 1963 

© Copyright 1963 by Calliard. Ltd.. AU nghts reserved. 

Reprinted by permission of Galaxy Munc Corp.. NY., sole U. S. agent. 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



181 



Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 108-132 

p. 108 Add to text following last line 
of page 

When it is necessary to shorten 
the service, at least sections 3, 4, 7, 
and 8 are used. 

Amendment 6 

Amend the text on page 109: 
THE BAPTISMAL COVENANT IH is 
a traditional text from the ritual of 
the former Methodist Church and 
the former Evangelical United 
Brethren Church. 

Delete the following nine lines. 

Amendment 7 

p. 109, Add the following text: 
Other approved services are 
found in The Book of Ritual of the 
Evangelical United Brethren 
Church (1959) pages 7-11 and 28-33 
and The Book of Worship for 
Church and Home of The 
Methodist Church (1965) pages 7-14. 

Amendment 8 

p. 109, Add to the text the following: 
The material marked by brackets 
[ ] is optional and may be omitted 
fi-om the service (p. 112, 118, 129). 

Amendment 9 

p. 110, 117, 128 

INTRODUCTION TO THE SERVICE 
Delete boliovore and thoir housoholdB 
and substitute we. 

Amendment 10 

p. 110, 117, 128 

RENUNCIATION OF SIN AND 
PROFESSION OF FAITH 

Delete Do you rqjoct the spiritual for 
co s of wickodnosB , rojoct the ovil powers 
of this world, and the bondag e of s in? 

and substitute: Do you renounce 
the spiritual forces of wickedness, 
reject the evil powers of this world, 
and repent of your sin? 

Amendment 11 

p. Ill and 118 

Delete To respond to God' s grace 
and substitute: to accept God's 
grace for themselves. 



Amendment 12 



117 



BAPTISMAL COVENANT U 

Add the following numbering system: 

1) The pastor makes the follow- 
ing statement to the congregation. 

2) A representative of the congrega- 
tion presents the candidates. 

3) The pastor addresses parents or 
other sponsors. 

page 118 

4) The pastor addresses the con- 
gregation. 

5) The pastor addresses all. 
p. 119 

6) The water may be poured into 
the font... 

p. 120 

7) As each candidate is baptized... 

8) When all candidates have been bap- 
tized... 

9) The pastor addresses the congrega- 
tion. 

Amendment 13 

p. 117 

Add to the text as a second rubric at 
the top of the page: When it is neces- 
sary to shorten the service, at least 
sections 3, 4, 7, and 8 are used. 

Amendment 14 

p. 121 

Add to the text at the end: When 
using the Service of the Baptism of 
Infants of the former EUB CHurch, 
this congregational act is used, the 
people standing: 

Pastor: Do you as a congregation ac- 
cept the responsibility of assisting these 
parents in fulfillment of the baptis- 
mal vows, and do you undertake to 
provide facilities and oppor- 
tunities for Christian nurture and 
fellowship? 

People: We will by the grace of (Jod. 

When using the service of the Bap- 
tism of ChUdren of The United 
Methodist Church, this congregational 
act is used, the people standing: 

Pastor: Members of the household of 
faith, I commend to your love and care 
these children, whom we this day recog- 
nize as members of the family of God. 
Will you endeavor so to live that they 
may grow in the knowledge and love of 
(jod, through our Savior Jesus Christ? 



People: With God's help we will so 
order our lives after the example of 
Christ, that these children, surrounded 
by steadfast love, may be estab- 
lished in the faith, and confirmed 
and strengthened in the way that 
leads to life eternal. 

Amendment 15 

Delete the Baptismal Covenant HI (p. 
122-127) 

Substitute the following: 

THE BAPTISMAL COVENANT HI 

HOLY BAPTISM 

FOR THOSE WHO CAN ANSWER 
FOR THEMSELVES 

CONFIRMATION 

REAFFIRMATION OF FAITH 

RECEPTION INTO THE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

RECEPTION INTO A LOCAL CON- 
GREGATION 

INTRODUCTION TO THE SERVICE 
The pastor makes the following 
statement to the congregation: 

The church is of God, and will be 
preserved to the end of time, 
for the conduct of worship 
and the due administration of God's 
Word and Sacraments, 

the maintenance of Christian fellow- 
ship and discipline, 

the edification of believers, 
and the conversion of the world. 
All of every age and station 
stand in need of the means of grace 
which it alone supplies. 

PRAYER FOR THOSE TO BE BAP- 
TIZED 

If there are no baptisms, the ser- 
vice continues with the Renuncia- 
tion of Sin and Profession of Faith. 

If there are candidates to be baptized, 
the pastor continues: 

Forasmuch as all have sinned and fal- 
len short of the glory of God, our Savior 
Christ said, "Unless one is bom of water 
and the Spirit, One cannot enter the 
kingdom of God." 

Let us pray: 

Almighty and everlasting (Jrod, we call 
upon thee for these thy servants, that 
they, coming to thy holy baptism, may 
receive remission of their sins and be 
filled with the Holy Spirit. 

Receive them, O Lord, as thou hast 
promised by thy well-beloved Son, and 
grant that they may be faithful to thee 
all the days of their lives, and finally 
come to the eternal kingdom which thou 



182 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30. 1988 



has promised; through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. Amen. 

RENUNCIATION OF SIN AND 
PROFESSION OF FAITH 

The pastor addresses those candidates 
for confirmation who have been pre- 
viously baptized: 

Do you in the presence of God and 
this congregation renew the solemn vow 
and promise made at your baptism? 

I do. 

The pastor addresses all candidates: 
Do you truly and earnestly repent of 
your sins? 
I do. 

Do you believe in God, the Father? 
I believe in God, the Father Almighty, 
creator of heaven and earth. 

Do you believe in Jesus Christ? 

I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, 
our Lord, [who was conceived by the 
Holy Spirit, bom of the Virgin Mary, suf- 
fered under Pontius Pilate, was 
crucified, died, and was buried; he de- 
scended to the dead. On the third day he 
rose again; he ascended into heaven, is 
seated at the right hand of the Father, 
and will come again to judge the living 
and the dead.] 

Do you believe in the Holy Spirit? 

I believe in the Holy Spirit, [the holy 
catholic church, the communion of 
saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resur- 
rection of the body, and the life everlast- 
ing.] 

Do you receive and profess the Chris- 
tian faith as contained in the scriptures 
of the Old and New Testaments? 

I do. 

Do you promise according to the grace 
given you to keep God's holy will and 
commandments and walk in the same 
all the days of your life as faithful 
members of Christ's holy Church? 

Ida 

BAPTISM 

If there are no baptism, the service 
continues with the Laying on of Hands. 

Of the candidates for baptism, the pas- 
tor inquires: 

Do you desire to be baptized in this 
faith? 

I do. 



As each candidate is baptized, the pas- 
tor says: 

Name, I baptize you in the name of 
the Father, and of the Son, and of the 
Holy Spirit. 

The people respond: 

Amen. 

LAYING ON OF HANDS, CONFIR- 
MATION OR REAFFIRMATION OF 
FAITH 

As the pastor, and others if desired, 
place hands on the head of each person 
who has been baptized or is being con- 
firmed or is reafilrming faith, the pastor 
says to each: 

Name, the Lord defend you with his 
heavenly grace and by his Spirit confirm 
you in the faith and fellowship of all 
true disciples of Jesus Christ. 

The people respond: 

Amen. 

RECEPTION INTO THE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

The pastor, addressing the people, 
may say: 

Let those persons who are members 
of other communions in Christ's holy 
Church, and who now desire to enter 
into the fellowship of this congregation, 
present themselves to be received into 
the membership of The United 
Methodist Church. 

The pastor addresses all those 
transferring their membership into 
The United Methodist Church, 
together with those who, through 
baptism or in confirmation, have 
just professed their faith: 

Will you be loyal to The United 
Methodist Church, and uphold it by 
your prayers, your presence, your gifts, 
and your service? 

I will. 

RECEPTION INTO THE LOCAL 
CONGREGATION 

Then the pastor may say: Let those 
who are members of other congrega- 
tions of The United Methodist Church, 
and who now desire to enter into the fel- 
lowship of this congregation, present 
themselves to be welcomed. 

COMMENDATION AND WELCOME 

Here a lay member, selected by the 
Administrative Board or Council, may 
join with the pastor in offering the right 
hand of fellowship to all those received. 



Then the pastor may have those 
received face the congregation and, caus- 
ing the people to stand, address them, 
saying: 

Brothers and sisters, I commend to 
your love and care these persons who 
we this day receive into the membership 
of this congregation. Do all in your 
power to increase their faith, confirm 
their hope, and perfect them in love. 
The congregation responds: 
We rejoice to recognize you as mem- 
bers of Christ's holy Church, and bid 
you welcome to this congregation of The 
United Methodist Church. With you we 
renew our vows to uphold it by our 
prayers, our presence, our gifls, and our 
service. With God's help we will so order 
our lives after the example of Christ 
that, surrounded by steadfast love, you 
may be established in the faith, and con- 
firmed and strengthened in the way that 
leads to life eternal. 

Then the pastor may give this or 
another blessing. 

God the Father, God the Son, and 
God the Holy Spirit bless, preserve, and 
keep you, now and evermore. Amen. 

Subject: Service of Christian Marriage 

Amendment 16 

Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 1063-1069 

page 1063, add to text: Other ap- 
proved services are found in The 
Book of Ritual of the Evangelical 
United Brethren Church (1959), 
page 34-38. The Book of Worship 
for Church and Home of the 
Methodist Church (1965), pages 28- 
31. 

Amendment 17 

page 1064, DECLARATION BY THE 
MAN AND THE WOMAN 

Delete: who has called you into union 
with himsolf through baptism . 

Substitute: who calls you into 
imion with himself as acknow- 
ledged in your baptism. 

Amendment 18 

page 1064 RESPONSE OF THE 
FAMILIES AND PEOPLE 

Delete: twe and substitute their. 

Subject: Daily Praise and Prayer 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



183 



19 



Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 1077-1084 

page 1082 PRAYERS OF THE 
PEOPLE 

add to text a final rubric: "Or, 
prayers for healing may be offered, 
such as the prayer "For the Sick" on 
page S44. 

Subject: Afiirmation 

Amendment 20 

Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 1085-1090 

page 1086, add: an * after "catholic" 
and a footnote reading "universal". This 
marking will appear on all other places 
where the Apostles' Creed is used in the 
new hymnal. 

Amendment 21 

Insert: The Modem Affirmation 
from The Book of Worship for 
Church and Home of the Methodist 
Church (1965). 

Subject: Litanies, Confession, As- 
surance, and Pardon and Lord's Prayer 

Amendment 22 
Pages in Report of the Hymnal Revision 
Committee to the 1988 General Con- 
ference: 1092-1094 

page 1092 #2, Lines 1, 15, delete 
Father , substitute God. 

Amendment 23 

Page 1093 #4, line 1, add to text Lord, 
we confess our day to day failure to be 
truly human. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



346' 



CS3 

Subject: AIDS and the Healing 
Ministry of the Chiu-ch 

Petitions: 611-CS-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-26 
Membership 104; Present 96 
For 93; Against 0; Not Voting 3 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
as amended: 

l.In Section II.C.l in the second sen- 
tence after the word barriers add in 
I community. 



2.1n Section n.D.3 delete ■ 
mandatory HIV te s ting . Also in the 
second sentence delete the words -aa4 
anonymity , and which and change the 
word includo to including so that the 
sentence reads: "Advocate for the 
development of accurate testing proce- 
dures which are voluntary and which 
guarantee confidentiality including 
counseling services." In the last sentence 
of this same paragraph, delete the final 
two words and anonymity . 

3. Note: In section n.D.4., the word «(- 
feet in the next to the last line should 
read effort. 

4.1n section n.D.6, delete the words 
living and life throatoning di e oa s o s and 
substitute for this last phrase 
AIDS/ARC (AIDS related complex). 

5. Add a new Par. #8 to Section II.D 
which reads as follows: "Request the 
health-related and health-care in- 
stitutions of The United Methodist 
Church to provide leadership in 
the creation of services including 
hospices and home health-care 
facilities for patients with AIDS 
and HIV patients, and to publicize 
their services to these patients in 
beneficial ways; and to further re- 
quest that wherever possible these 
institutions join with other agen- 
cies in research activities. 

6. Add a new Par. #9 to Section II.D 
which reads as follows: Work for 
public policies and the allocation 
of public resources for research 
and prevention, treatment, and 
elimination of AIDS related dis- 
eases. Monitor private insurance 
company policies related to 
coverage and benefits for persons 
with AIDS and HIV related dis- 
eases. 

7. Delete Par. #8 of Section II.D and 
insert new Par. #10 which reads as fol- 
lows: Encourage worldwide 
cooperation by all countries in 
sharing research facilities and find- 
ings in battling this disease, mind- 
ful that governments, churches, 
families, and persons in every 
region of the world are affected by 
the AIDS epidemic. 

8. Add a new Section E to II of the 
resolution which reads as follows: E. 
We commend the interagency ef- 
forts by the General Boards of Dis- 
cipleship, Church and Society, and 
Global Ministries to address the 
AIDS crisis and lu-ge the continua- 
tion and growth of this work to en- 
vision, create, and help facilitate a 
plan for AIDS ministry and educa- 



tion within The United Methodist 
Church. We urge these boards im- 
mediately to inform and enlist the 
annual conferences in the work of 
this ministry and to continue to 
report their action to the General 
Conference. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



347 CS9 

Subject: Sexual Harassment in 
Church and Society in the USA 

Petitions: 620-CS-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-1-31 
Membership 104; Present 93 
For 91; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee voted concurrence to 
the petition in the Advance DCA with 
three additions: 

1. Substitute at end of the first sen- 
tence: . . . and thus have been made 
equals in Christ. 

2. Add, following sentence 1 of Par. 2: 
Sexual harassment must be under- 
stood as an exploitation of a power 
relationship rather than as an ex- 
clusively sexual issue. 

3. Add a new Item 4, following Item 3, 
and before the last paragraph: 4-Model 
in its own life an environment of 
hospitality where there is not only 
an absence of harassment but the 
presence of welcome, respect, and 
equality. 

( ) Concurrence 



I Nonconcurrence Date / 



348 



CS12 

Subject: Task Force on 
Gay/Lesbian Issues 

Petitions: 34 l-CS-3 000 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-14 Adv. 
Membership 104; Present 96 
For 80; Against 16; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Concur in this substitute resolution: 

Whereas, human sexuality is affirmed 
by The United Methodist Church as a 
good gift from the God of love, but a gift 
that can contribute both to fulfillment 
and to brokenness among imperfect 
people; and 

Whereas, the interpretation of 
homosexuality has proved to be par- 
ticularly troubling to conscientious 
Christians of differing opinion; and 

Whereas, important biblical, theologi- 
cal, and scientific questions related to 
homosexuality remain in dispute among 
persons of good will; and 



184 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



Whereas, the church possesses the 
resources of mind and spirit to resolve 
such issues reasonably and in faithful- 
ness to the gospel it proclaims; 

Therefore, be it resolved that the 
General Council on Ministries be 
directed to conduct a study and report to 
the 1992 General Conference, using con- 
sultants as it deems appropriate, includ- 
ing persons representative of the major 
existing points of view on homosexuality 
within the church and persons well- 
versed in scientific and theological 
method. The council shall: 

a) Study homosexuality as a subject 
for theological and ethical analysis, 
noting where there is consensus among 
biblical scholars, theologians, and 
ethicists and where there is not. 

b) Seek the best biological, psychologi- 
cal, and sociological information and 
opinion on the nature of homosexuality, 
noting points at which there is a consen- 
sus among informed scientists and 
where there is not. 

c) Explore the implications of its 
study for the Social Principles. 

Be it further resolved that this action 
become effective unmediately upon the 
adjournment of the 1988 General Con- 
ference. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Agamst 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence because issue con- 
tained in #1199. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



349^ 



^ ^^ GA29 

Subject: Missional Priority: Peace 

and Justice 

Petitions: 320-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-11 
Membership 82; Present 76 
For 75; Against 0; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Nonconcurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



350= 



GA30 
Subject: Deaf Ministries 

Petitions: 2450-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence because #1199 
covers the issue. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



351* GA31 
Subject: Deaf Ministries 

Petitions: 2451-GA-3000-R 



Membership 82; Present 76 
For 74; Against 1; Not Voting 1 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



352 



* 



GA32 

Subject: Deaf Ministries 

Petitions: 1339 
Pages in Advance DCA: 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence because issue con- 
tained in #1199. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



353* 



GA33 

Subject: Restate Goal to Increase 
Membership 

Petitions: 2440 

Pages in Advance DCA: See text below 

Membership 82;Present 76 

For 62; i^ainst 12; Not Voting 2 

Date: April 28, 1988 

The committee recommends noncon- 
CTurence. 
MOTION: 

Whereas the 1984 General Conference 
adopted a goal of increasing total mem- 
bership while also directing each annual 
conference to set its own targets, peti- 
tion that the 1988 General Conference 
restate that goal to now read: 

"We petition the 1988 General Con- 
ference to adopt the goal of recommit- 
ment to an increase in spiritual growth, 
stewardship, and outreach of its mem- 
bers as well as increasing the member- 
ship of The United Methodist Church by 
the end of the next quadrennium." 
The changes in the present and 
proposed wording should then be: 

"We petition the 4S84 1988 General 
Conference to adopt the goal of recom- 
mitment to an increase in spiritual 
growth, stewardship, and outreach 
of its members, as well as increasing the 
membership of The United Methodist 
Church to 30,000 , 000 porsonB by the 
end of the next two quadronnia quadren- 
nium." 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



355^ 



GA34 

Subject: Training Events for 
DS/CCD 

Petitions: 1228-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G-55 
Membership 82; Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



356* GA36 
Subject: Goal to Increase 
Membership 

Petitions: 1229-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G-55 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



354 



GA35 
Subject: Baltimore Declaration 

Petitions: 1223-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G-52 



357' 



GA37 

Subject: Report on the 
Development of the 
Recommendation for a Theme for 
the Denomination 
Petitions: 1214-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G-31 
Membership 82; Present 73 
For 73; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: April 28, 1988 
Concurrence. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



358' 



^^_ GA42 

Subject: Ccnsxiltation on Deaf 

Ministries 

Petitions: 340-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-14 
Membership 82; Present 76 
For 76; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Nonconcurrence because of #1199. 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



359* GA50 
Subject: Prison Ministry 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



185 



Petitions: 330 GA-3000R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D2-12 
Membership 82; Present 72 
For 72; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 29, 1988 

Committee recommends conconcur- 
rence because concerns cared for in peti- 
tion #1205 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



p G-7, column 3: C becomes D; D be- 
comes E; E becomes C 

In A, line 3, after "witnessing", add 
and reaching the unchurched 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



360^ 



GA41 

Subject: Developing Congregations 
for Deaf Ministry 

Petitions: 1199-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G-11 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date: AprU 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 

( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



361 



GA40 

Subject: Missional Priority: Peace 
with Justice 

Petitions: 3 18-3 19-32 1-322-323-GA- 
3000R 

Pages in Advance DCA: D2-11 
Membership 82; Present 76 
For 75; Against 1; Not Voting 
, Date: 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence because of #3 13 

I ( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



362' 



GA39 
Subject: No Missional Priority 

Petitions: 313-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: D-2-11 
Membership 82; Present 77 
For 77; Against 0; Not Voting 
Date:April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence. 
( ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



363 GA38 
Subject: Theme for 1989-92 
Quadrenniiun "Celebrate God's 
Grace: Witness for Jesus Christ" 

Petitions: 1195-GA-3000-R 
Pages in Advance DCA: G6-G8 
Membership 82; Present 78 
For 72; Against 3; Not Voting 2 
Date: April 28, 1988 

Committee recommends concurrence 
as amended: 

p G-7, column 1: C becomes B; B be- 
comes C 



oo_o 



Q 



Q 



O 



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©Cokesbury 
Books • B.ble. • Church Suppl.ts / 

INVITES YOU TO MEET: 

BISHOP 

WOODIE W. 

WHITE 

Author of: 

Confessions Of A Prarie Pilgrim 

Autographing books 
Saturday, April 30 

12:30 • 1:30 
Cokesbury Display 

• Have your books 
autographed! 

• Located in the Cokesbury 
display at General 
Conference. 



Q 



Q 



Q 



Q 



Q 



Q 



O Q O 



Q 



186 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



AprU 30, 1988 



Proceedings of the 1988 General Conference 
The United Methodist Church 



of 



Coimnittee On Journal 
Report 

The Committee on Journal 

hereby certifies as accurate, with the 
following corrections, the proceedings 
as printed in the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate for Thursday, April 28, 1988. 

Daily Edition, p. 134, col. 1, par. 1 - 
Insert after "Singapore": 

"And Bishop Pieters from the 
Methodist Church in Belgium- (ap- 
plause) Over the week-end, we had 
twenty-five of our affiliated 
autonomous bishops with us. You will 
be interested to know that with all of 
those bishops who were here, the 
women and men who represent the 
bishops of The United Methodist 
Church and the affiliated autonomous 
churches now have episcopal super- 
vision in fifty different countries of the 
world. This is indeed a great tribute to 
the efforts of Methodist people and 
other bodies related to The United 
Methodist Church across the decades. 
Let's greet now again these persons we 
are honored to have in our midst, (ap- 
plause)" 

Daily Edition, p. 136, col. 1, par. 3 - 
Substitute "Blackburn" for "Black- 



Jamima DeMarcus (chair) 

Section A, row 15 



Friday Morning April 
29, 1988 

Bishop Robert M. Blackburn, presiding 

(Morning Worship) 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: You'U find 
your places as quickly as possible; we will 
begin our agenda. Let the folks come in 
from the outside, find their place. 

(Music) 

You'll find your places quickly. All right, 
if you will be seated please. We are a mo- 
ment or two behind. You'll help us as we 



try to catch up. If you would turn, please, 
to the first page of the Daily Christian Ad- 
vocate for today, Friday, April 29; if you'll 
note down at the left-hand column at the 
bottom the shaded area, which gives the 
agenda for today. Bishop Duffey said it 
seems like the General Conference goes 
on forever; we are however making a little 
bit better time than it shows here. The 
agenda says Thursday, April 28; this is 
Friday. Some of you may think it ought to 
be Saturday; but it's Friday, April 29, and 
for the record we make that correction. 

For the past quadrennium, Bishop Paul 
Duffey, who has led us so superbly in our 
worship this morning, has served as the 
secretary of the Council of Bishops; and he 
is in charge now of the order of the day, 
calling for recognition of the retiring 
bishops. Bishop Paul Duffey. 

BISHOP PAUL DUFFEY: Thank you, 
Mr. Chairman. We are pleased to present 
these brothers and sister to you and recog- 
nize their outstanding service-many of 
them, a long number of years. We have 
these persons retiring, and we will ask 
them to come in the order of their election. 
And you wiU acknowledge them at the end 
if you will, please, after we have intro- 
duced all of them. 

Bishop Earl Hunt, Jr., was elected in the 
class of 1964 (if you would come. Bishop 
Hunt) and has served for 24 years. Bishop 
James Thomas was elected in that same 
class, served for 24 years. Bishop Frank 
Schaefer was elected in 1966, served for 23 
years. Bishop Ole Borgen was elected in 
1970 and has served 19 years. Bishop 
James Ault was elected in the class of 
1972, has served 16 years. Bishop Robert 
Blackburn has served 16 years. Bishop 
Jesse DeWitt has served 16 years. Bishop 
Almeida Penicela was elected in 1976 and 
has served 12 years. Bishop Hermann 
Sticher was elected in 1977 and has served 
12 years. Bishops Schaefer, Borgen, and 
Sticher will retire in March of 1989; all 
others will be in August of 1988. Bishop 
Roy Clark in the class of 1980, also Bishop 
Emerson Colaw, Bishop John Wesley 
Hardt in that class; Bishop Kern Eutsler 
in the class of 1984 and Bishop Leontine 
Kelly in the class of 1984. 

BISHOP MELVIN TALBERT: And 
members of the General Conference, it's 
my privilege to recognize Bishop Paul Duf- 



fey, who was elected in the class of 1980 
and served 8 years and will be retiring at 
the end of August 1988. 1 am privileged to 
present him because he has served so ef- 
fectively for 4 years as secretary of the 
Council of Bishops, and I will have to 
receive that mantle at the end of August. 
Paul Duffey. 

BISHOP DUFFEY: Thank you very 
much. 

BISHOP TALBERT: Greet all of these 
fellows and this lady, (applause) 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Thank you 
very much. On behalf of all of these who 
have the somber possibility of retirement, 
we thank you very much. I would also like 
to acknowledge the retirement of one 
member of the Judicial Council. Dr. 
Hoover Rupert has been the secretary 
longer than any other person in the his- 
tory of the Judicial Council, and he retires 
this year. How long have you been in the 
council? He's been a member of the coun- 
cil for 20 years. Dr. Hoover Rupert, (ap- 
plause) 

DR. HOOVER RUPERT: Thank you 
very much, Mr. Chairman. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Thank you. 
Now we hear from Clifton Ives, who chairs 
our Committee on Courtesies. 

CUFF IVES (Maine): Thank you, 
Bishop Blackburn. This morning we have 
the high privilege of reaching across the 
Atlantic Ocean again to receive some spe- 
cial greetings and a special presentation 
from our delegation from Great Britain. I 
ask Brian Beck and that delegation to 
come forward and make that presentation 
at this time 

BRL^ BECK (Great Britain): Mr. 
Chairman and members of conference, 
every year it is our pleasure in Great 
Britain to welcome representatives of this 
General Conference to our conference. 
And eveiy four years we are grateful to 
return the exchange and to sit with you as 
delegates in the General Conference. This 
year, of course, is special. Our two chur- 
ches-indeed all Methodist churches~in 
the world are celebrating the 250th an- 
niversary of John Wesley's conversion, 
and the minds of Methodists will be turn- 
ing to the city of London. On May 24th 
representatives of World Methodism wiU 
join us in Britain for a celebration of the 
events of that day in 1738, following 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



187 



Wesley's own pathway: first, at St. Paul's 
Cathedral where the anthem was "Out of 
the Depths I Ciy to Thee," and then at 
Aldersgate where the prayer was 
answered. Some of you, I know, will be 
there. Others will watch on TV. 

We have been preparing for this event 
in Britain for years, and one of the 
decisions we took was to mark the year by 
ofiicially registering a flag. We've never 
had a flag for British Methodism, and we 
wanted to mark this particular year by 
having one officially registered with the 
College of Heralds in London. The device 
we have settled upon is simple and yet we 
hope states what we're about. It is white 
on red on white. It is the world embraced 
to its limits by the cross. It is the world sur- 
roimded by the grace which that cross 
proclaims. It is the world filled with the 
fire of the Spirit. It proclaims what God 
has done for the world and what He wills 
to do for the world. 

In 1784, following your independence 
from British rule, with Mr. Wesley's bless- 
ing you became a separate connection 
from us. In those days of sea travel it could 
not have been otherwise. Over the years 
history has made us different, at least in 
some respects. We have a different Dis- 
cipline; we have a different liturgy; we in 
Britain have no Articles of Religion; we 
have no bishops but an annual president. 
And I guess we also differ on which of us 
has got it right. But we have much in com- 
mon too, and it's a happy sign of our com- 
mon roots and partnership in the gospel 
that now we share in each others con- 
ferences and trust each other enough to 
give each other voting rights. 

In this particular year we from Britain 
offer you this sign of the gospel we share, 
and we pray that God may makeyou~and 
US-faithful to it. Chairman, would you 
please accept this flag for your conference 
from the conference of The Methodist 
Church in Great Britain? 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Thank you 
veiy much, sir. 

CLIFTON IVES (Mame): We come to a 
veiy interesting time for us. We are 
privileged to live in the computer age. 
Back at the United Methodist building in 
Richmond where I work, if we have any- 
thing that doesn 't go right, we don't blame 
it on the secretaries or even on the bishop, 
we blame it on the computers. However, 
the computers now are working; and they 
are marvelous instruments for us. And 
they save us much time, and they do a lot 
of our thinking. We have before us some- 



thing that we have anticipated for several 
quadrennia: that some day the time would 
come when we could use mechanical 
means of voting which will be a help and 
a blessing, I think, to General Conferen- 
ces across many years to come. 

I have been told that it has been tested 
now~our mechanical voting program. It is 
in good order. It has been tested four 
times. We have been told by the inter- 
preters that they are very delighted with 
the program of mechanical voting because 
during the countdown it gives them much 
more time for interpreting the motion to 
their delegates then it does when the 
presiding officer merely calls for the vote 
immediately. It also is going to be a help 
to those who are presiding here, the 
bishops; particularly those coming next 
week. Because it records for us the actual 
vote, there will not be the necessity to 
make a judgment of whether it was a 
majority or two-thirds. 

It's very clearly there for us and that will 
be a help to all of us. Certainly it should 
expedite our conference this year and help 
us in so many ways. We're grateful to the 
technicians who have spent many days 
and hours, especially to Dr. DeWayne 
Woodring, who has led us and prepared 
for this conference. I'm going to ask now 
that Dr. Woodring will come and 
demonstrate for us the use of the mechani- 
cal voting; and here in a few moments 
later as we deal with some of our calendar 
items, we will put it into use. Dr. Wood- 
ring, we are grateful to you. Will you lead 
us now as we demonstrate our mechanical 
voting? Try it again, DeWayne. I think 
that was a human error, maybe. 

DEWAYNE WOODRING: The 
electronic voting system is alive and well. 
It has been tested with the mass choir 
Tuesday evening. It was tested again with 
persons we recruited who were walking 
down the hallways. We brought them in, 
pushed buttons. Thirdly, we tested it four 
times this morning with the marshals, 
pages, and today's choir. The system has 
reported an accurate count each time it 
was used. The problem during the Tues- 
day afternoon session was with the com- 
puter program it takes to run the system. 
This is an actual copy of the computer 
program. The program is yards long. It 
contains thousands of numbers and com- 
mands. Near the end of the program they 
found a bug in the program. Actually, one 
three-digit number was not entered cor- 
rectly into the computer. When this was 



changed to the correct number, the sys- 
tem performed flawlessly. 

One other item: Do not be concerned 
about the light on the key pad. Whether 
the light is on or off or flashing does not 
affect the ability of the system to record 
your vote. Now, please turn to p. 123 of 
today's DCA and note the boxed item en- 
titled "Directions for Electronic Voting." It 
was felt during the previous test some per- 
sons were pushing the buttons too early. 
Therefore, we have changed the presiding 
officer's call for the vote to the words 
Please vote when numbers appear on the 
screen. Vote any time during the 
countdown from nine to one, press button 
1 for a yes vote, button 2 for a no, button 
3 for abstention. For this test this morn- 
ing we will assume that a motion is before 
you. You may vote any way you want on 
the motion by pressing button 1, button 2, 
or button 3. Bishop Blackburn, will now 
call for the vote. 

BLACKBURN: The motion is before 
you. Please vote when numbers appear on 
the screen. Amen. 

WOODRING: The test is complete and 
the system is ready for your use. Thank 
you so much for your patience and par- 
ticipation. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Three cheers 
for the computers and the workers. 
Thanks to all of you for a very splendid ser- 
vice you have performed for this con- 
ference. Now we turn to the calendar 
items. Donna LaPoint will call out these 
items for us. Bishop Nacpil. All right we're 
ready for the calendar items, Bishop Nac- 
pil will lead us and call us to the pages to 
which we will refer. 

Calendar No. 1 

BISHOP EMERITO P. NACPIL: Mr. 
Chairman and members of the General 
Conference. I would like to draw your at- 
tention to the Daily Christian Advocate 
for Thursday, yesterday, pages 112-113. 
There you find the calendar items 
scheduled for today. In 1984, you 
regularized the status of the Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs, and we 
have been happy to function under the 
terms and conditions provided therein. 
Calendar No. 1 seeks to amend Par. 527 of 
the 1984 Discipline by making the holding 
of the conference of Methodist bishops on 
call of the Council of Bishops following 
consultation of Methodist bishops with 
other members of the conference of 
Methodist bishops. It makes it possible to 
hold the conference at the site of the 



188 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



World Methodist Council which meets 
every five years, or at the site of General 
Conference which meets every four years. 
The commission recommends concur- 
rence with this calendar item. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. This 
is before you. Let me call to attention, 
especially to those who are new delegates, 
how you are voting regarding concurrence 
and nonconcurrence. In this instance the 
Legislative Committee chaired by Bishop 
Nacpil has called for concurrence of this 
first petition, and when you vote to agree 
with the committee you will vote yes. For 
example, though the next petition, peti- 
tion No. 2, the committee calls for noncon- 
currence; in other words not concurring 
with the petition, so if you want to agree 
with the committee, you will again vote 
yes, even though it calls for nonconcur- 
rence. Sometimes they get confused be- 
cause they're voting yes, for something 
that says no. So keep that in mind as you 
vote, as you vote yes on this next one, the 
first one, you will be voting to agree with 
the committee and they concur with this 
petition. I believe now we are ready to 
vote. All right. Please vote when numbers 
appear. All right. The petition passes, 96 
percent, 915 for, 32 against, and the mo- 
tion is passed. All right. Bishop Nacpil. 

Calendar No. 2 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 2. 
Since you approve Calendar No. 1, the 
commission recommends nonconcur- 
rence on this matter. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: If you agree 
with the committee on nonconcurrence 
will you vote yes? If you disagree vote no. 
Please vote when the numbers appear. 
And you have approved the nonconcur- 
rence recommendation of the committee. 
All right. 

Calendar No. 3 
BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 3 is a 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Point of order. 
Microphone 7 please, your name and your 



FAY CLEVELAND (Western New 
York): I thought we were operating under 
the rule that if there were no negative 
votes that the items went on the consent 
calendar. These two actions we have just 
taken, apparently neither had negative 
votes, and yet we're dealing with them as 
if they need to be dealt with. 



BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. Let's 
turn to our secretaries and see what they 
rule. 

FAITH RICHARDSON: Since the Com- 
mission on Central Conference Affairs has 
the right to report directly to the General 
Conference, their petitions or calendar 
items alone do not have a consent calen- 
dar. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Veiy weU, 
we'll continue then with Calendar No. 3. 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 3 is a 
piece of new legislation which, if ap- 
proved, would be placed following Par. 609 
of the Discipline. It provides for an addi- 
tional way of relating to a church within 
the Methodist family, by an Act of 
Covenanting. It outlines the scope and 
procedure of the Act of Covenanting. A 
more-detailed elaboration of this is to be 
found in the Advance DCA D-1-70. The 
commission recommends concurrence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. This 
is before you. Microphone 7, you'll give us 
your name and your conference please. 

VERNON BIGLER (Western New 
York): Bishop, I move to amend this report 
to reinsert the words where the word 
Christian is marked out to reinsert Chris- 
tian. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. Is 
that supported with a second? Is there a 
second to this? All right, sir, you'll speak 
to it please. 

BIGLER: Dear friends, this statement 
has somewhat narrowed the extent of the 
possibility of dialogue, conversations, 
ecumenical relations when it replaces 
Methodist and other affiliated churches in 
place of the word Christian. It has been 
the hope, I think, of all of us on the com- 
mission on ecumenical concerns, that this 
kind of opening of the possibility of 
covenanting with other chiarches woxJd 
also include some churches which may not 
strictly be Methodist heritage or tradition. 
Whether it does include other churches 
beyond our Wesleyan heritage or not, at 
least the word Christian leaves the door 
open for that and it does not preclude the 
possibility of a kind of covenant which 
would be possible with strictly Wesleyan 
heritage churches. So I urge this broader 
inclusion of a more ecumenical term than 
strictly Methodist and other affiliated 
Methodist churches. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. This 
amendment is before you. Does anyone 
wish to speak against it before we call on 
Bishop Nacpil to respond? All right. 
Bishop Nacpil. 



BISHOP NACPIL: Well, the rationale 
provided for these is already to be found 
in your calendar item. There is a stronger 
and better possibility for the covenanting 
relationship within the Methodist family 
and we can build on the success that may 
be attained through that channel. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. 
Anyone else wish to speak to this amend- 
ment? All right. The amendment is before 
you. If you favor the amendment, please 
vote when the numbers appear. And the 
amendment is passed. All right. We 
proceed with that. 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: We were stiU 
to vote on No. 3. Any further discussion 
on Calendar No. 3? All right, you appear 
to be ready. If you favor the action of the 
committee on No. 3, will you please vote 
when the numbers appear? And the report 
is adopted. All right, Calendar No. 4. 

Calendar No. 4 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 4 the 
commission recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, any 
questions? Any discussion? If you favor 
nonconcurrence, will you please vote 
when numbers appear by indicating the 
yes? Oh, did I miss somebody? I'm sony. 
Way back here in the back. I'm sorry, I 
didn't see your card. Microphone 13, 
please. Your name and conference. 
Microphone 13, all right, sir. 

PAUL CHAFFEE (Western Pennsyl- 
vania): Mr. Chairman, when you are 
posing the question, you're putting it in a 
position of asking us to vote if we are in 
favor of the proposition, not asking us to 
vote whether or not we are in favor. Since 
we're taking both kinds of votes at the 
same time, I just thought that ought to be 
brought to your attention. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Thank you, 
sir. I meant to say, "Do you vote to approve 
the recommendation of the committeer 
Would you like for us to retake that vote? 
All right. If you favor the recommendation 
of the committee on No. 4, will you please j 
vote when the numbers appear? All right, 
the motion to approve this is approved. 

Calendar No. 5 

BISHOP NACPIL: No. 5 now. The com- 
mission recommends concurrence with 
this item. This petition makes liability for 
property holding the responsibility of the 



April 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



189 



central conference instead of The United 
Methodist Church. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, this 
is before yoa Any discussion? If you favor 
the recommendation of the committec.Is 
someone objecting? Microphone 3, please. 
Your name and conference, please? 

JERRY MAYO (Tennessee): You're still 
calling for the vote, vote by asking if you 
favor, vote now. Some of us might not 
favor, we would like to vote no. And it 
prejudices the vote. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Thank you, 
sir. If you are ready to vote now on report 
No. 5, please vote when the numbers ap- 
pear. And the report is adopted. 

Calendar No. 6 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 6, the 
petition referred to in this calendar item 
isn't published in the Advance DCA. It is 
printed here in full. As you can see, it seeks 
to make itineration of bishops in jurisdic- 
tional conferences operational in 
countries covered by central conferences 
where there are more than one bishop. 
The commission recommends nonconcur- 
rence on this petition. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, No. 6 
is before you. You've heard their recom- 
mendation. Do you wish to discuss it? All 
right, we're ready to vote. Please vote 
when the numbers appear on the screen. 
Calendar No, 6 is adopted. All right. No. 7. 



Calendar No. 7 

BISHOP NACPIL: On Calendar No. 7 
the commission recommends nonconcur- 
rence. The reasons are there indicated. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Any discus- 
sion? If you are ready to vote, would you 
vote now on No. 7. Please vote when the 
numbers appear. And the report is 
adopted. All right. No. 7...No. 8. 

Calendar No. 8 

BISHOP NACPIL: No. 8 is particularly 
a matter of editorial revision. It intends to 
retitle Section 5, Chapter 5, making 
provision for the Act of Covenanting char- 
ges, which we have just approved. The 
commission recommends concurrence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, 
you're ready to vote. Any discussion? If 
you will vote now as the numbers ap- 
pear...Calendar No. 8 is adopted. 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 9 mdi- 
cates what an autonomous Methodist 



church is and what an affiliated 
autonomous Methodist church is depend- 
ing on the Act of Covenanting. The com- 
mission recommends concurrence. 

Calendar No. 9 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. No. 
9. Any discussion? Anyone want to speak 
to this? It is before you now. Will you vote 
as the numbers appear? No. 9 is adopted. 
All right. 

Calendar No. 10 

BISHOP NACPIL: No. 10 simplifies the 
process of developing a concordat 
relationship with another church by 
eliminating the role of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Commission on Central Con- 
ference Affairs. We think that is no longer 
necessary. The commission recommends 
concurrence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Any discus- 
sion of this? It is before you, will you please 
vote now as the numbers appear? No. 10 
now is adopted. Turn to No. 11. 

Calendar No. 11 

BISHOP NACPIL: Calendar No. 11 
simplifies the process of developing a con- 
cordat relationship with another church 
by eliminating the role of the Executive 
Committee of the Commission on Central 
Conference Affairs. The commission 
recommends concurrence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Are you on 
No. 12? 

BISHOP NACPIL: That was 11. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Any discus- 
sion on No. 11? You've heard the recom- 
mendation of the committee. You appear 
to be ready. Will you please vote now as 
the numbers appear? No. 11 now is 
adopted. We turn to No. 12, report 12, 
Calendar No. 

Calendar No. 12 

BISHOP NACPIL: The commission 
recommends nonconcurrence on Calen- 
dar No. 12. In the mind of the commission 
this petition would only complicate what 
is already dear and straightforward in the 
Discipline, which covers the same subject. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, this 
is before you. I see a hand over here. Come 
to microphone 4. Your name and con- 
ference, please? 



VICTOR GOLDSCHMIDT (North In- 
diana): There are two parts to this peti- 
tion. I'm wondering whether we should 
take them in two pieces or at once.. .ad- 
dressing page C-67, the bottom right. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: If you are caU- 
ing for division, we can let the house 
decide. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: I'd like to call for a 
division of those two parts which address 
653. lb and 653. le. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: AU right, he's 
calling for division, which is not 
debatable. Are you ready to vote? If you 
will...if you favor the division of these 
items, please vote by using the numbers. 
FAITH RICHARDSON: You can ask for 
a vote of hands. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: And you have 
barely voted to divide it. Now, if you would 
turn to p. C-67. All right, now as they turn 
to it, are you going to speak to it, sir? Is 
that correct? 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Yes, I'd like to very 
much. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: If you fmd 
your place, C-67 Advance Edition...and 
Mr. Goldschmidt will speak to that. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Maybe, we also want 
to have the Discipline open so we track the 
comparison and that will be p. 302, the 
upper left where it says B. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: P. 302 in your 
Discipline. P. C-67 in your Advance Daily 
Advocate. All right, sir. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Thank you. I think 
the essential issue is here: How do we re- 
late with a church which maybe is in a 
geographical region within which there is 
not a central conference? Let me make a 
supposing. Supposing there is a church in 
Bolivia who likes to become part of The 
United Methodist Church. Under the 
present Discipline requirements it has to 
apply to a central conference. Yet there is 
no central conference in Latin America. 
So we are imposing somewhat of a politi- 
cal-geographical impairment to that 
process. The petition.. .this first part simp- 
ly says in the process of applying, if a 
church is within the area of a central con- 
ference, it shall apply through the central 
conference, essentially is what the Dis- 
cipline says. But it does add, however, if it 
is not within a central conference, it then 
will apply directly through the Council of 
Bishops rather than going through some 
other geographic region which is not 
where they live; and I think this is an im- 
portant issue of distinction and sen- 
sitivity. 



190 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



BISHOP BLACKBURN: You need then 
to make an amendment, Mr. 
Goldschmidt, to the reporters, as I under- 
stand it. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Yes, I think maybe 
you are correct because we took it into two 
pieces. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: AU right, sir. If 
you have an amendment for us, we will 
deal with it. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: I think procedure- 
wise I am now stuck. And I foresee the fu- 
ture already. I'll try it anyhow. I hereby 
move that we amend to adopt 653. lb as in 
C-67 petition number 160. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. Is 
there a second to this amendment? It is 
before you. All right, point of order back 
here, if you come to microphone 12. 

PAUL MEUSCHKE (Western Pennsyl- 
vania): I believe the brother made a speech 
before he made his motion, and that's out 
of order. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: No sir, that's 
not out of order. We prefer that they make 
the motion first, but that's all right. All 
right. The amendment has been made and 
been spoken to, will anyone speak against 
the amendment? Anyone want to speak 
against it? Anyone from the floor want to 
speak for it? You seem to be ready, it's 
before you with the amendment by Mr. 
Goldschmidt. Let's let Bishop Nacpil 
make the response. 

BISHOP NACPIL: I don't need to make 
a statement on that matter. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. 
Ready to vote. Let's have the secretaiy 
read for us the amendment. It isn't up here 
yet, however. 

DENNY WHITE: The amendment sir, 
is to essentially restore the language that's 
printed on C-67 about two-thirds of the 
way down the page where it says "Amend 
Par. 653.1b): Said church, if it is within..." 
it is to restore that paragraph. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: As it is here on 
C-67, is that correct. 

WHITE: Yes sir. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Par. 653. 
That's before you then. I think we can 
proceed with that dearly before yoa 
You're asked to vote to include it as it is in 
your DCA or your Advance DCA, C-67 Par. 
653. Is that dear? Anyone question? I 
think we can go ahead and vote then. If 
you will vote on the amendment now. 
Anyone have any question about what you 
are voting on? Please vote when numbers 
appear. And the amendment is approved. 
All right, microphone 4. All right, sir. 



GOLDSCHMIDT: I move that we 
amend to indude the original wording as 
in Par. 653. le, bottom of C-67, petition 
160. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. We 
are voting on the second division, is that 
correct? Is that my understanding? The 
second half. Is there a second to this? All 
right. It's before us. 

BISHOP NACPIL: This now is to be 
consistent with the action we just took in 
amending Par. 653. lb, the first part. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. 
Anyone wish to speak against it? 
Microphone 8. Your name and con- 
ference? 

FRITZ A, MUm (Missouri West): I 
think the conference might be helped if 
Bishop Nacpil could explain why the legis- 
lative committee voted nonconcurrence. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Yes, I'm going 
to let him respond after there's any debate 
on the amendment. Any others? All right. 
Bishop Nacpil. 

BISHOP NACPIL: The reasoning of the 
commission is that in any case where a 
church wants to become a part of The 
United Methodist Church and where 
there is no central conference, the request 
will be processed through the Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs and recom- 
mendations will then go to the General 
Conference for its action. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: AU right. 

BISHOP NACPIL: Because the process 
is rather dear and straightforward and 
the commission did not feel that the 
darity should be messed up again. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. We 
have heard the response; now it is time for 
us to vote. Please vote when the numbers 
appear on the screen. And the amendment 
is passed. 

And now will you adopt No. 12? Do you 
need to speak to it again. Bishop Nacpil? 
Any more on No. 12? Will you adopt this 
as amended? No. 12. Will you please vote 
now as the numbers appear? And the item 
is adopted as amended. 

All right. Calendar No. 13. Microphone 
6, please, sir. 

WILLIAM MACARTNEY (East Ohio): 
Bishop, were we voting on Calendar No. 
12? 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: That was my 
understanding. 

MCCARTNEY: The recommendation 
of the committee was nonconcurrence; so 
if the vote at that point was positive, it 



would be in sustaining the nonconcur- 
rence recommendation. Is that correct? 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: No. We had 
amended it. 

MCCARTNEY: Yes, I understand that 
we had amended it. But as amended, 
would it not still cany the word or the tag 
from the committee? This will happen 
again, so we ought to be dear from the 
start. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: I understand. 
Very well, I appreciate you bringing this 
up. It is my understandingthat the motion 
as we amended became the substitute for 
anything that the committee was recom- 
mending, and so it is before us as was 
amended. 

MCCARTNEY: Thank you, that hdps 
in this case. Will there be other occasions 
though, when amendments are not sub- 
stitutes and amended will still cariy the 
tag of nonconcurrence? 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Possibly so, 
but we'll worry about that later. OK? All 
right. I think you're doing right well; keep 
it up. No. 13. 

Calendar No. 13 

BISHOP NACPIL: The commission 
recommends concurrence on Calendar 
No. 13. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Any discus- 
sion. No. 13? The committee recommends 
concurrence in discussion. You seem to be 
ready. Please vote now as the numbers ap- 
pear. And No. 13 as recommended by the 
committee is adopted. No. 14? 

Calendar No. 14 

BISHOP NACPIL: No. 14, Mr. Chair- 
man, is mistitled. It should read "Proposed 
New Episcopal Area in the Africa Central 
Conference." This petition, published in 
the Advance DCA, comes from the Africa 
Central Conference. It requests the 
General Conference for an enabling act in- 
creasing the number of episcopal areas in 
the Africa Central Conference by one and 
to increase the number of effective 
bishops by one more, and so bring the 
number of effective bishops from seven to 
eight. The reasons given by our brethren 
and sisters in Africa is that since 1984 
there has already been organized a new 
annual conference. There are some 150 
ministerial members and some 40,000 
members. The area in which this annual 
conference has been organized has 
tremedous potentiality for growth, and 



AprU 30, 1988 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



191 



providing episcopal supervision at this 
time would greatly facilitate growth. The 
commission recommends concurrence on 
this petition. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, No. 
14 is before you with their recommenda- 
tion for concurrence. 

BISHOP NACPIL: This matter has 
some dollar signs to it, and it would be 
referred, if approved by you, to the GCFA. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: AU right, it's 
before \is. I see, microphone 3, please. 

DON CARVER aowa): A question. 



BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, sir. 

DON CARVER: Since this was not 
published in the Advance DCA, should not 
this petition be before us in writing or in 
printing? And especially if it has dollar 
signs to it, would it not be important for 
us to see that, please? 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Our 

secretaries indicate that you are correct in 
assuming that. Could we hold this and 
have it put in the DCA tomorrow to be 
taken up next week? 

BISHOP NACPIL: That's all right with 
us. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Very well, we 
will do that. All right any other items? Mr. 
Bleven, any more from agenda? We have 
a recommendation from the Calendar 
Committee, Donna LaPoint. 

Petitions 1082 and 652 

DONNA LAPOINT (California- 
Nevada): I want to move to suspend Rule 
No. 32, which is on p. B-19 in the Advance 
DCA; and I do this in order to consider the 
Africa Initiative: A United Methodist 
University for Africa, Petition 1082, in the 
Advance DCA, p. F-58. If I have a second, 
I'll speak to the reason. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. The 
second is before us. 

DONNA LAPOINT: We had expected 
that that petition would be published in 
the DCA of today. It was turned in in time, 
but there's been a glitch in the process; 
and so it's not before you, and it has finan- 
cial implications and, if passed, would 
need to be referred to GCFA. We had ex- 
pected to have that kind of thing happen 
tommorrow so that there would be plenty 
of time for GCFA to take a look at it if it 
was passed and referred to them, and 
that's the reason for this motion before 
you. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Your motion is 
that it be brought up tomorrow? To 



suspend the rules so it can be brought up 
tomorrow? Is that my understanding? 

DONNA LAPOINT: That's correct. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. If 
you will suspend the rules, will you vote as 
the numbers appear? Took a necessary 
two-thirds and we got 92%. The motion is 
to suspend the rules as adopted. Thank 
you veiy much Ms. LaPoint. Anything else 
from the Agenda Committee? 

LAPOINT: The chair of the Agenda 
Committee has said to me that now that 
we have a rule suspended, I need to move 
that that Petition 1082 be an order of the 
day for tomorrow, Saturday. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: AU right, this 
is from the committee. Does it need a 
second? This is not debatable, I believe. 
It's not debatable it's my understanding. 
All right. If you favor this motion from the 
committee, will you vote as the numbers 
appear? And you have approved this order 
of the day for tommorrow, April 30. 
Thank you so much. Anything else from 
agenda? All right, if you'll come to 
microphone 14. 

ELEANOR RICHARDSON (North 
Georgia): Would it be in order, Bishop, to 
have the same courtesy afforded to Peti- 
tion 652 on E-29? It has the same kind of 
time constraint, needs money, deals with 
the establishment of the Advisory Coor- 
dinating Council for Older Adults. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: If you will you 
make that as a motion, Ms. Richardson, I 
think we can... 

ELEANOR RICHARDSON (Georgia): I 
so move. Bishop. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Is there a 
second? Seconded. If you'll speak to it 
please. 

ELEANOR RICHARDSON: I think it 
just needs the same constraint because of 
the time element and it requires money, 
sir. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. We 
have to suspend the rules again for us to 
do this. If you will suspend the rules will 
you please indicate now as the numbers 
appear on the screen? ... All right, you have 
voted to suspend the rules. Now the mo- 
tion is before us to include this item in 
tomorrow's calendar. Is there discussion 
on this? I'll call on Mrs. LaPoint in a 
minute. Do I see a hand here? All right, 
sir. Microphone 13. 

DAN SOLOMON (Southwest Texas): 
Those of us who cany committee respon- 
sibilities are greatly concerned that the 
work of the Agenda Committee is being 
done by the whole of the Creneral Con- 



ference. These items are aU importtmt, 
there's no doubt about that, but what we 
are doing is competing with important 
items. There's no way to describe which is 
more important. We have an Agenda 
Committee for that purpose. I would ap- 
petd to the conference for us to allow the 
Agenda Committee to set the calendar 
items in consultation with the various 
groups and legislative committees that 
need to report, and therefore we'll have a 
much more orderly flow of the calendar 
than if we do the work of the Agenda Com- 
mittee as the body of the whole. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. Let 
me be clear now. The first proposal did 
come from the Agenda Committee is my 
understanding, and this second has come 
from the floor, right Mr. Bevan? 

JOHN BEVAN: I would essentially 
repeat what has already been said and add 
that the legislative committees, in many 
instances, still have a great deal of work to 
be done, are counting on tomorrow and 
probably late tomorrow. The previous ac- 
tion did come as a request of the total 
Calendar Committee to the Agenda Com- 
mittee and so had some background plan- 
ning in it. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right, Mrs. 
Richardson's motion is before us. The first 
motion passed, it came from the commit- 
tee. The other came from the floor. The 
motion that Mrs. Richardson made—if you 
approve that calendar item-what was the 
number? E? Petition 652 was what she 
called for, for consideration for tomorrow. 
If you favor putting that on the calendar 
tomorrow, please vote now as the num- 
bers appear. And the motion lost. It will 
not appear on the calendar tomorrow. All 
right. Brother Bevan, anything else? 

JOHN BEVAN: Yes, the tentative 
calendar for tomorrow now stands: first 
item of business, following worship, is at 
9 a.m. we will hear the special report from 
the Missional Priority Coordinating Com- 
mittee and the Commission on Religion 
and Race, which was voted yesterday as an 
order of the day for tomorrow. We then 
will have a report from the Courtesies 
Committee. We'll move to calendar items 
and, given the action that just has been ap- 
proved, we can anticipate returning to the 
legislative committees at 11 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. Let me repeat, at the 
strong urging of the chairpersons of the 
legislative committees this morning, that 
a lot of work is yet to be done in commit- 
tees. Many committees expect to be going 
until midnight or later tomorrow night to 



192 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



April 30, 1988 



complete their work, and they need all the 
time they can get yet today and tomorrow 
in committees. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Dr. Bcvan, 
about today, what is your recommenda- 
tion? You want us to wait until eleven or 
you want us to 

JOHN BEVAN: We recommend that we 
ac^oum immediately now to committees. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. Hold 
your places now. We have some tm- 
nouncements; we also have an an- 
nouncement regarding the presiding 
officer for tomorrow. We'll hear from Mr. 
Walker and then I'll have announcements 
from the Secretary. 

JAMES WALKER (Southwest Texas): 
Bishop Blackburn and fellow delegates, 
your Committee on Presiding Officers is 
pleased to announce that our presiding of- 
ficer for tomorrow morning's session will 
be Bishop Lecntine T. C. Kelly of the San 
Francisco Area. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. 
Bishop Kelly will preside tomorrow morn- 
ing. In a moment we'll have oiu- closing 
prayer. I want to thank Bishop Earl Himt 
and Bishop Paul Duffey for supporting me 
during this time. I see ... Microphone 13 
and I see some cards here. All right. 

JOY PERRY (Virginia): This is just 
some information I wanted to know as to 
what has been done about the request to 
have the bishops from the autonomous 
churches be seated in a different area. I 
was wondering if anything had been done 
about that, any arrangements made? I 
think it's an important thing. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: That comes 
under the Commission on the General 
Conference. Is there a person on the stage 
that represents that commission to 
respond. Ms. Alguire, is she here? All 



right. Ms. Alguire is coming to 
microphone 4, please. 

FRANCES ALGUIRE (Northern D- 
linois): Many of the bishops from 
autonomous churches have the privilege 
of voice, but not vote. They are seated with 
the delegation body so they will be not 
denied that privilege. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. 
Thank you, Ms. Alguire. All right, over 
here. Microphone 4. 

RALPH BATES (North Alabama): This 
may be a personal privilege. Bishop Lloyd 
C. Knox of the Birmingham Area is unable 
to attend the General Conference due to 
emergency knee surgery. I suggest that 
greetings be sent to Bishop and Mrs. Knox 
from the General Conference. Thank you. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: Very good, 
thank you, and I'm sure that will be done 
by our secretary. All right, way back in the 
far comer. I see your card. Come to 
microphone 15. 

RODOLFO C. BELTRAN (Middle 
Philippines): I would like to present the 
motion. May I move that all sermons of all 
the bishops and all morning worship ser- 
vices in this General Conference, starting 
April 26, 1988 to May 6, 1988, be printed 
in full text in the DCA. Ifthereisasecond 
I want to speak. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right. You 
have a second. You can speak to it, please, 
sir. 

BELTRAN: Mr. Chairman, I found out 
that the sermons delivered by our bishops 
in this General Conference are wonderful, 
marvelous and full of message and, there- 
fore, these sermons should be distributed 
in the entire international jurisdiction in 
the entire world. Second, that these ser- 
mons should be the pattern and guide of 
our lay leaders and ministers, not only of 
The United Methodist Church, but all the 



persons who serve in this work. Thank 
you. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: All right I 
think it's proper that Ms. Alguire again 
come to the microphone and respond for 
the commission. Everything that goes in 
the DCA must have the approval of this 
commission. Ms. Alguire, would you 
please come? Yes, thank you, microphone 
4. 

ALGUIRE: Bishop Blackburn, I was 
writing my.. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: I'm sorry, the 
request is that the messages of the 
bishops, the worship services messages, be 
printed in the DCA each day, or during 
this time. 

ALGUIRE: I am sure if you would ask 
the body for their support they would vote 
unanimously. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: You recom- 
mend that the body vote rather than the 
commission to decide. 

ALGUIRE: I would move that this 
recommendation be approved. 

BISHOP BLACKBURN: In other 
words, you second his - we've got the mo- 
tion before us. Any further discussion? All 
right, if you'll vote now as the numbers ap- 
pear on the screen. All right. You have 
voted to do this, and Brother Duffey says 
he'll have to get busy with his notes. Okay. 
All right. And I'm told there are no an- 
nouncements from the secretary. I'm 
going to call on a former professor of mine 
who taught me in seminary more years 
ago than I want to admit here and who 
also has been a colleague of mine in the 
Council of Bishops for sixteen years, 
Bishop Mack Stokes, to come and lead us 
in our closing prayer. Will you stand please 
for the prayer? 

(Prayer) 




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Daily Report 

Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Vol. VII 



St. Louis, Missouri, Monday, May 2, 1988 



No. 6 



Good Morning! 

Conference Heads Into the Home Stretch 

OK on Africa University highlights Saturday action 



Their first major action behind them, 
delegates begin this morning a week of 
plenary sessions seeking to complete the 
business of the General Conference by 
the scheduled adjournment at 10 p.m. 
Friday. 

The week gets off to a busy start with 
a full morning agenda beginning at 9 
a.m. Bishop James S. Thomas of the 
Ohio East Area, senior active bishop in 
the church, will be in the chair. 
(continued on page 195) 





Agenda 




Monday, May 2 


8:30 a.m. 


Worship 


9:00 a.m. 


Report: Advance For 






9:10 


Nominations: 




University Senate 




General Council on 


Finance & Administration 


9:30 a.m. 


Courtesies 


9:35 a.m. 


Calendar Items: 




Consent Calendar #2 


10:30 a.m. 


Homosexuality 


12:30 p.m 


Recess for Lunch 


2:30 p.m. 


Call to Order 


2:35 p.m. 


Calendar Items 


5:00 p.m. 


Recess for Dinner 


7:30 p.m. 


Call to Order 


7:35 p.m. 


Ballot for 




Secretary-designate 






7:50 p.m. 


General Council on 










8:50 p.m. 


Calendar Items 


9:45 p.m. 


Agenda Committee 




Report 




Committee Report 




Adjournment 




'^'^'-'-^^.-p.j^. 




1 1 EI» 










£1 






A- 



'T'i»^^r.r, 





This montage of African scenes has been adapted from a series done by watercolor artist 
Jerry Baum, a United Methodist from Evansville, Ind. 



194 



DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



May 2, 1988 



a> %? VSf i^I< VSt »I4 1^4 6L4 ^ ^ ^ ^41^ SO 



Youth Choir To Participate in Worship 

^ 1^ ^ ^ ►^ ^^ >ii >ii »i< ^ ^ ^ »5 *5 







i _ f ^ •!* 

The Sonshine Senior High Choir of the Brentwood (Tenn.) UMC, will participate in today's worship. The choir, made up of over 100 senior high stu- 
dents in grades 9-12, rehearse each week and participate in their church's 9:45 a.m. service. The choir sings for several events in the Nashville area, 
as well as an eight-day tour each summer. The director of the choir is Marl< Acker, director of music ministries, and Karen McCarty is the accom- 
panist. The Senior High Choir is a part of a total junior and senior choir program including choirs, ensembles, and handbells, which involve over 
175 high school students. 



Monday Worship 
Leaders from Michigan, 
Arizona 

Bishop Judith Craig and the Rev. De- 
Wane Zimmerman will lead worship as 
the 1988 General Conference moves into 
its second week. 

Bishop Craig serves the Michigan 
Area. She preaches at 8:30 a.m. in Cer- 
vantes Convention Center. 

A graduate of 'William Jewell College, 
Eden Theological Seminary and Union 
Theological Seminary, Bishop Craig 
began her pastoral career in 1972 serv- 
ing a congregation in Cleveland, Ohio. 
She was director of the East Ohio Con- 



ference Council on Ministries when 
elected to the episcopacy in 1984. 

Bishop Craig was a delegate to the 
1980 and 1984 General Conferences. 
She serves on the General Commission 
on the Status and Role of Women. 

Preaching at 2:30 p.m. today at St. 
Patrick's Catholic Church is Mr. Zim- 
merman. The church is one block west 
of the convention center on 7th Street. 

First reserve clergy delegate in the 
Desert Southwest delegation, Mr. Zim- 
merman is completing his 11th year as 
senior pastor of First United Methodist 
Church, Phoenix, Ariz. He serves on the 
General Board of Higher Education and 
Ministry. 



Mr. Zimmerman has served churches 
in California and Arizona. He was also 
superintendent of the San Diego District 
and conference director of church and 
university in the former Southern 
California-Arizona Conference. 

After graduating from Whitworth Col- 
lege, Spokane, Wash., Mr. Zimmerman 
earned a master of theology degree at the 
Graduate School of Theology of the 
University of Southern California. 

Liturgist this afternoon will be Rene 
Pino, a member of the Oregon-Idaho 
delegation and an educational consult- 
ant in Portland, Ore. 



M C( 




Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices, Room 127, Cervantes Convention Center 
Sales and Subscriptions, DCA Booth near Publishing House 
Display in Civic Center Exhibition Hall. 

Staff 



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Containing the proceedings, 
legislative committee reports, 
and other records of the 
1988 General Conference of 
the United Methodist 
Church 

Daily Christian Advocate is 
published in several advance and daily 
editions, except Sunday, during ses- 
sions of the 1988 General Confere